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The Tangled Web Of Ugc: Making Copyright Sense Of User-Generated Content, Daniel J. Gervais Jan 2009

The Tangled Web Of Ugc: Making Copyright Sense Of User-Generated Content, Daniel J. Gervais

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

Even as a mere conceptual cloud, the term "user-generated content" is useful to discuss the societal shifts in content creation brought about by the participative web and perhaps best epitomized by the remix phenomenon. This Article considers the copyright aspects of UGC. On the one hand, the production of UGC may involve both the right of reproduction and the right of adaptation-the right to prepare derivative works. On the other hand, defenses against claims of infringement of these rights typically rely on (transformative) fair use or the fact that an insubstantial amount (such as a quote) of the preexisting work ...


Solidifying The Defensive Line: The Nfl Network's Current Position Under Antitrust Law And How It Can Be Improved, Ethan Flatt Jan 2009

Solidifying The Defensive Line: The Nfl Network's Current Position Under Antitrust Law And How It Can Be Improved, Ethan Flatt

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

In the United States, the broadcasting of professional sporting events is a multi-billion dollar industry, and the National Football League (NFL) alone earned more than $3 billion from television contracts during its 2008 season. Considering the massive revenues that broadcast rights can generate, it is no surprise that some major professional sports leagues have recently developed their own television networks. While it was not the first league-owned television network, the NFL Network has certainly generated the most attention. Since it started broadcasting a select number of NFL regular season games in 2006, the NFL Network has been subject to media ...


Uneasy Lies The Head That Wears The Crown: Why Content's Kingdom Is Slipping Away, Jonathan Handel Jan 2009

Uneasy Lies The Head That Wears The Crown: Why Content's Kingdom Is Slipping Away, Jonathan Handel

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

This Article examines the ongoing power struggle between the content industries (with a particular focus on Hollywood) and the technology industry. These two sectors are intertwined like never before, yet their fates seem wildly divergent, with content stumbling while distribution technology thrives.

The Article begins by illustrating that, even before the recession took hold, traditional paid content was in trouble, and that this was and is true across a range of distribution platforms and content types, including theatrical motion pictures, home video, network television, music, newspapers, books, and magazines. The Article next posits six reasons for content's discontent: supply ...


A First Amendment For Second Life: What Virtual Worlds Mean For The Law Of Video Games, Marc J. Blitz Jan 2009

A First Amendment For Second Life: What Virtual Worlds Mean For The Law Of Video Games, Marc J. Blitz

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

In the first decade of the twenty-first century, video games have finally taken their place alongside movies, comic books, and drawings as a form of protected First Amendment speech. Since the Seventh Circuit's 2001 decision in American Amusement Machine Association v. Kendrick, court after court has struck down ordinances and statutes aimed at restricting violent video games--on the grounds that such violate game designers' and players' First Amendment speech rights. This series of rulings marks a stark change from courts' previous stance on video games, which consigned them to the same realm of unprotected non-speech conduct as games like ...


The Magic Circle, Joshua A.T. Fairfield Jan 2009

The Magic Circle, Joshua A.T. Fairfield

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

This Article examines the concept of the "magic circle," the metaphorical barrier that supposedly excludes real-world law from virtual worlds. The Article argues that this metaphor fails because there is no "real" world as distinguished from "virtual" worlds. Instead of a magic circle, this Article advocates a rule of consent: actions in a virtual world give rise to legal liability if they exceed the scope of consent given by other players within the game. The Article concludes that although real-world law cannot reasonably be excluded from virtual worlds, game gods and players can control the interface between law and virtual ...


Dr. Strange-Rating Or: How I Learned That The Motion Picture Association Of America's Film Rating System Constitutes False Advertising, Jason K. Albosta Jan 2009

Dr. Strange-Rating Or: How I Learned That The Motion Picture Association Of America's Film Rating System Constitutes False Advertising, Jason K. Albosta

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), a trade association whose members include film production studios, distributors, and theater chains, administers the most popular system for rating the content contained in the vast majority of publicly exhibited motion pictures in the United States. The stated goal of the rating scheme is to caution parents about any objectionable content that a film contains in order to allow them to make informed decisions about which films they will allow their children to see. While the rating scheme has undergone several changes since its establishment to further its stated goal, a fundamental conflict ...


Stop The Bleeding: Title Ix And The Disappearance Of Men's Collegiate Athletic Teams, Victoria Langton Jan 2009

Stop The Bleeding: Title Ix And The Disappearance Of Men's Collegiate Athletic Teams, Victoria Langton

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

Title IX, originally conceived to protect women from gender discrimination, has had the unfortunate and unintended effect of significantly reducing opportunities for male athletes to compete in their sports at the collegiate level. The various Department of Education opinion letters interpreting Title IX and its regulations provide three routes by which universities can comply with Title IX's requirement of equal opportunities for women to participate in collegiate athletics, one of which is proportionality between the percentage of athletic opportunities for women as compared to the percentage of women in the general population of the school. Circuit courts' current interpretation ...


One Strike And You're Out: Alcohol In The Major League Baseball Clubhouse, Steven B. Berneman Jan 2009

One Strike And You're Out: Alcohol In The Major League Baseball Clubhouse, Steven B. Berneman

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

In the past decade, much has been written about Major League Baseball's (MLB) mistaken policies regarding performance-enhancing substance abuse by players. MLB executives are shortsighted, however, if they believe that steroids are the only substances being abused by players. Along with performance-enhancing drugs, professional baseball has a long-standing history of alcohol abuse. Steroids may provide better headlines--Congress has never held an investigation into alcohol abuse by professional athletes--but professional baseball faces a real danger from the unchecked liability of allowing players to overindulge at the ballpark and drive home shortly thereafter. By serving beer in the clubhouse after games ...


The "Spiritual Temperature" Of Contemporary Popular Music, Tracy Reilly Jan 2009

The "Spiritual Temperature" Of Contemporary Popular Music, Tracy Reilly

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

The purpose of this Article is to contribute to the volume of legal scholarship that focuses on popular music lyrics and their effects on children. This interdisciplinary cross-section of law and culture has been analyzed by legal scholars, philosophers, and psychologists throughout history. This Article specifically focuses on the recent public uproar over the increasingly violent and lewd content of death-metal and gangsta-rap music and its alleged negative influence on children. Many legal scholars have written about how legal and political efforts throughout history to regulate contemporary genres of popular music in the name of the protection of children's ...


Respect My Authority! South Park's Expression Of Legal Ideology And Contribution To Legal Culture, Kimberlianne Podlas Jan 2009

Respect My Authority! South Park's Expression Of Legal Ideology And Contribution To Legal Culture, Kimberlianne Podlas

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

This Article recognizes that television programs outside of the law genre can engage in legal discourse: to wit, South Park. South Park has been called one of the most profane programs on television, as well as one of the most ideological. Indeed, through sophisticated, no-holds-barred satire, South Park contemplates a number of American culture's most complex and contentious legal issues. This Article systematically analyzes the legal ideologies conveyed by South Park, combining an interpretive ethnographic analysis with quantitative content analyses. Ultimately, these examinations reveal that South Park communicates a libertarian ideology of law. In doing so, however, it does ...