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Vanderbilt University Law School

Series

Law enforcement

1986

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Structure And Enforcement Of Job Safety Regulation, W. Kip Viscusi Jan 1986

The Structure And Enforcement Of Job Safety Regulation, W. Kip Viscusi

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

For more than a decade, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has been regulating the technology and work practices of employers. This governmental function is relatively new and is quite different from the usual governmental involvement in labor market policies. Some government efforts, such as job training and unemployment compensation, involve no direct impact on workplace operations, except that which may be induced indirectly through the incentives these policies generate. Even the minimum wage law does not directly lead to any governmental intrusion into the nature of the work relationship. In contrast, OSHA regulations specify what safety guards must …


The Risks And Rewards Of Criminal Activity: A Comprehensive Test Of Criminal Deterrence, W. Kip Viscusi Jan 1986

The Risks And Rewards Of Criminal Activity: A Comprehensive Test Of Criminal Deterrence, W. Kip Viscusi

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

Whereas previous analyses of criminal deterrence have focused on the effect of criminal enforcement on crime rates, this study analyzes the existence of compensating differentials for criminal pursuits. By analyzing the risk-rewards trade-off, this approach represents a more comprehensive test of the criminal deterrence hypothesis. The sample consisted of black inner-city youths who reported their crime participation, crime income, and self-assessed risks from crime. The risk premiums for the three principal adverse outcomes (arrest, conviction, and prison) constituted between one-half and two-thirds of all crime income on the average, providing strong support for the criminal deterrence hypothesis