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University of Washington School of Law

2014

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Autonomous Vehicle Law Report And Recommendations To The Ulc Based On Existing State Av Laws, The Ulc's Final Report, And Our Own Conclusions About What Constitutes A Complete Law, University Of Washington Technology Law And Public Policy Clinic Dec 2014

Autonomous Vehicle Law Report And Recommendations To The Ulc Based On Existing State Av Laws, The Ulc's Final Report, And Our Own Conclusions About What Constitutes A Complete Law, University Of Washington Technology Law And Public Policy Clinic

Technology Law and Public Policy Clinic

This report was created by the University of Washington’s Technology Law and Policy Clinic for the Uniform Law Commission (ULC). It was created at the request of Robert Lloyd, Professor of Law at the University of Tennessee and a member of the ULC’s subcommittee for autonomous vehicles. The report aims to do three things: (1) present the existing autonomous vehicle provisions on the books in California, Michigan, Florida, Nevada, and Washington, D.C.; (2) analyze these provisions, address related questions raised in the ULC’s Final Report, and make recommendations to the ULC; and (3) offer draft provision language to illustrate our …


Amended Complaints Post-Twiqbal: Why Litigants Should Still Get A Second Bite At The Pleading Apple, Dane Westermeyer Dec 2014

Amended Complaints Post-Twiqbal: Why Litigants Should Still Get A Second Bite At The Pleading Apple, Dane Westermeyer

Washington Law Review

The Supreme Court’s landmark decisions in Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly and Ashcroft v. Iqbal have had a serious effect on the way that Rule 12(b)(6) Motions to Dismiss are handled in federal courts across the country. In the five years since Iqbal was handed down, scholars and practitioners alike have discussed the merits and effects of this decision at length. However, there has been very little—if any—discussion on the relationship between amended complaints and original complaints when it comes to this newly-minted plausibility standard. This Comment aims to examine and critique a post-Twiqbal practice regarding amended complaints that …


Foreword: Compensated Surrogacy In The Age Of Windsor, Kellye Y. Testy Dec 2014

Foreword: Compensated Surrogacy In The Age Of Windsor, Kellye Y. Testy

Washington Law Review

The authors in this timely symposium tackle the many and varied issues related to compensated surrogacy with sophisticated, diverse, and careful analysis. Moreover, they do so in the context of fast-paced legal and sociological change on issues of marriage and parenting, some of which was crystalized in the recent United States v. Windsor decision that spurred growing recognition of gay marriage and families across the nation.


Windsor, Surrogacy, And Race, Khiara M. Bridges Dec 2014

Windsor, Surrogacy, And Race, Khiara M. Bridges

Washington Law Review

Scholars and activists interested in racial justice have long been opposed to surrogacy arrangements, wherein a couple commissions a woman to become pregnant, give birth to a baby, and surrender the baby to the couple to raise as its own. Their fear has been that surrogacy arrangements will magnify racial inequalities inasmuch as wealthy white people will look to poor women of color to carry and give birth to the white babies that the couples covet. However, perhaps critical thinkers about race should reconsider their contempt for surrogacy following the Supreme Court’s recent decision in United States v. Windsor. …


The Future Of Compensated Surrogacy In Washington State: Anytime Soon?, Terry J. Price Dec 2014

The Future Of Compensated Surrogacy In Washington State: Anytime Soon?, Terry J. Price

Washington Law Review

Americans in the mid-1980s were shocked by the facts of the Baby M case. That case, a compensated surrogacy arrangement that publicly went very wrong, raised complicated issues that the country had not considered: whether a woman could contract to carry a pregnancy for another person without becoming the legal mother; whether she could be separated from the child at birth, even though it was her genetic offspring; and whether the contract could take precedence over a mother’s regret over giving up the child. As a result of that case, a number of states, including Washington, prohibited compensated surrogacy arrangements. …


Straddling The Columbia: A Constitutional Law Professor's Musings On Circumventing Washington State's Criminal Prohibition On Compensated Surrogacy, Peter Nicolas Dec 2014

Straddling The Columbia: A Constitutional Law Professor's Musings On Circumventing Washington State's Criminal Prohibition On Compensated Surrogacy, Peter Nicolas

Washington Law Review

In this Article, I recount—through both the prisms of an intended parent and a constitutional law scholar—my successful efforts to become a parent via compensated surrogacy and egg donation. Part I of this Article provides a narrative of my experience in becoming a parent via compensated surrogacy, and the various state and federal legal roadblocks and deterrents that I encountered along the way, including Washington State’s criminal prohibition on compensated surrogacy as well as federal guidelines issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regarding the use of sperm by gay donors in the process of in vitro fertilization. Part …


Compensated Surrogacy, Martha A. Field Dec 2014

Compensated Surrogacy, Martha A. Field

Washington Law Review

The question that was put to us is whether the widespread legalization of gay marriage, supported by the Supreme Court’s decision in United States v. Windsor, means that compensated surrogacy should be more broadly legalized. This essay takes the position that Windsor has little relevance to surrogacy, which will continue to be governed by state rather than federal law. States do, and will, follow a wide spectrum of policies on surrogacy, ranging from banning it and making it illegal to promoting it by enforcing surrogacy contracts as ordinary commercial transactions. The legalization of gay marriage need not affect states’ …


The House Of Windsor: Accentuating The Heteronormativity In The Tax Incentives For Procreation, Anthony C. Infanti Dec 2014

The House Of Windsor: Accentuating The Heteronormativity In The Tax Incentives For Procreation, Anthony C. Infanti

Washington Law Review

Following the Supreme Court’s decision in United States v. Windsor, many seem to believe that the fight for marriage equality at the federal level is over and that any remaining work in this area is at the state level. Belying this conventional wisdom, this Article plumbs the gap between the promise of Windsor and the reality that heteronormativity has been one of the core building blocks of the federal tax system. Eradicating embedded heteronormativity will take far more than a single court decision (or even revenue ruling); it will take years of work uncovering the subtle ways in which …


Bearing Children, Bearing Risks: Feminist Leadership For Progressive Regulation Of Compensated Surrogacy In The United States, Sara L. Ainsworth Dec 2014

Bearing Children, Bearing Risks: Feminist Leadership For Progressive Regulation Of Compensated Surrogacy In The United States, Sara L. Ainsworth

Washington Law Review

Compensated surrogacy—an arrangement in which a woman carries and gives birth to a child for someone else in exchange for money—intimately affects women. Yet, feminist law reformers have not led efforts to regulate this practice in the United States. Their absence is notable given the significant influence of feminist lawmaking in a host of other areas where women’s interests are at stake. This lack of feminist law reform leadership can be understood, however, in light of the complex issues that surrogacy raises—complexity that has long divided feminists. In response to efforts to pass surrogacy legislation in Washington State in 2010, …


For A Feminist Considering Surrogacy, Is Compensation Really The Key Question?, Julie Shapiro Dec 2014

For A Feminist Considering Surrogacy, Is Compensation Really The Key Question?, Julie Shapiro

Washington Law Review

Feminists have long been engaged in the debates over surrogacy. During the past thirty years, thousands of women throughout the world have served as surrogate mothers. The experience of these women has been studied by academics in law and in the social sciences. It is apparent that if properly conducted, surrogacy can be a rewarding experience for women and hence should not be objectionable to feminists. Improperly conducted, however, surrogacy can be a form of exploitation. Compensation is not the distinguishing factor. In this essay I offer two changes to law that would improve the surrogate’s experience of surrogacy. First, …


Racial Impact Statements: Considering The Consequences Of Racial Disproportionalities In The Criminal Justice System, Jessica Erickson Dec 2014

Racial Impact Statements: Considering The Consequences Of Racial Disproportionalities In The Criminal Justice System, Jessica Erickson

Washington Law Review

The American criminal justice system is currently suffering from a dramatic increase in mass incarceration and staggering rates of racial disproportionalities and disparities. Many facially neutral laws, policies, and practices within the criminal justice system have disproportionate impacts on minorities. Racial impact statements provide one potential method of addressing such disproportionalities. These proactive tools measure the projected impacts that new criminal justice laws and policies may have upon minorities, and provide this information to legislators before they decide whether to enact the law. Four states currently conduct racial impact statements, and other states are considering adopting their own versions. The …


Brief For Respondent. United States V. Wong, 134 S.Ct. 2873 (2014) (No. 13-1074), 2014 Wl 5804278, Eric Schnapper, Tom Steenson, Beth Creighton, Michael Rose Nov 2014

Brief For Respondent. United States V. Wong, 134 S.Ct. 2873 (2014) (No. 13-1074), 2014 Wl 5804278, Eric Schnapper, Tom Steenson, Beth Creighton, Michael Rose

Court Briefs

QUESTIONS PRESENTED

1. Is the six-month limit on filing suit under the Federal Tort Claims Act, 28 U.S.C. 2401(b), jurisdictional?

2. If the six-month limit for filing suit under the Federal Tort Claims Act, 28 U.S.C. 2401(b), is not jurisdictional, is it subject to equitable tolling?


Reply Brief For Appellants. Alabama Legislative Black Caucus V. Alabama, 135 S.Ct. 1257 (2015) (No. 13-895), 2014 Wl 5475026, Eric Schnapper, James U. Blacksher, Edward Still, U.W. Clemon Oct 2014

Reply Brief For Appellants. Alabama Legislative Black Caucus V. Alabama, 135 S.Ct. 1257 (2015) (No. 13-895), 2014 Wl 5475026, Eric Schnapper, James U. Blacksher, Edward Still, U.W. Clemon

Court Briefs

No abstract provided.


Uwlaw, Fall 2014, Vol. 68 Oct 2014

Uwlaw, Fall 2014, Vol. 68

Alumni Magazines

Message from the Dean, page 1

Law School News

  • UW Law Offers New J.D/M.B.A & Masters of Jurisprudence Degree Options, pages 2-3
  • UW Law Hosts 2014 Patent and Intellectual Property Law Summer Institute, pages 4-5, photo
  • Limited License Legal Technicians LLLT Program's First Successful Year at UW Law, page 6
  • UW Law Sponsors New Conference on Global Health, page 7

Starbucks Executive Adam Brotman '95 Is Leading the Digital Drive and Staying True to His Entrepreneurial Roots, pages 8-13, photos

The Next Generation of Excellence at UW Law (faculty leaders in their fields: Mary Fan, Ryan Calo, Melissa Durkee, Zahr …


Consignment Catastrophes: Lessons From New York's Art Gallery Fraud, Megan Haslach Oct 2014

Consignment Catastrophes: Lessons From New York's Art Gallery Fraud, Megan Haslach

Washington Journal of Law, Technology & Arts

The 2007 collapse of Salander O’Reilly Gallery in New York City caught the attention of New York’s state lawmakers after artists and their heirs lost nearly $120 million in gallery owner Lawrence Salander’s schemes. This scandal ultimately led lawmakers to enact major changes in the state’s art consignment statute. The changes bolstered existing protections while adding additional safeguards for artists who choose to consign their works through galleries rather than selling them wholesale. This Article will examine the relationship between consignors and consignees, highlighting major vulnerabilities that current consignment statutes create for artist consignors. In Section I, this Article will …


The Nudging Ballot? A Response To Professor Foley, Lisa Marshall Manheim Oct 2014

The Nudging Ballot? A Response To Professor Foley, Lisa Marshall Manheim

Articles

In a response to Professor Edward Foley's The Speaking Ballot: A New Way to Foster Equality of Campaign Discourse [89 N.Y.U. L. Rev. Online 52 (2014)], Professor Manheim notes that "the speaking ballot may, in fact, affect elections, that influence may be due less to a flourishing of informed and reasoned debate and more to the exploitation of subtle forms of voter manipulation." She raises questions about the decisions faced by election officials on candidate photographs and videos and timing of updated videos. She concludes: "In short, Professor Foley, through his call for the facilitation, rather than the limitation, of …


The Not So Speedy Trial Act, Shon Hopwood Oct 2014

The Not So Speedy Trial Act, Shon Hopwood

Washington Law Review

The Speedy Trial Act (STA) of 1974 occupies a peculiar place in the criminal justice system. Very few pieces of legislation can lay claim to protecting both the rights of criminal defendants and the public’s significant interest in timely justice, while reducing the cost of judicial administration. The STA formerly accomplished these lofty aims by reducing pretrial delays. But for the past two decades legal scholars have ignored the STA, and both prosecutors and defense attorneys have subverted the STA’s goals by routinely moving for continuances. And although the Act categorically applies in every federal criminal case, it has been …


Keeping Up With Technology: Why A Flexible Juvenile Sexting Statute Is Needed To Prevent Overly Severe Punishment In Washington State, Reid Mcellrath Oct 2014

Keeping Up With Technology: Why A Flexible Juvenile Sexting Statute Is Needed To Prevent Overly Severe Punishment In Washington State, Reid Mcellrath

Washington Law Review

Sexting can be a costly activity, particularly for teenagers. As more teenagers engage in sending sexually explicit images to one another, the likelihood of serious long-term consequences increases. When sexting is used as a means to bully, the potential severity of consequences also increases. In many jurisdictions, prosecutors may charge juveniles caught sexting with possession or distribution of child pornography. At the same time, some states have recognized the severity of such a charge and found other ways of addressing the teen sexting problem. This Comment addresses the current issues surrounding juvenile sexting by examining empirical data, legal responses, and …


This Is Your Sword: How Damaging Are Prior Convictions To Plaintiffs In Civil Trials?, Kathryn Stanchi, Deirdre Bowen Oct 2014

This Is Your Sword: How Damaging Are Prior Convictions To Plaintiffs In Civil Trials?, Kathryn Stanchi, Deirdre Bowen

Washington Law Review

The conventional wisdom in law is that a prior conviction is one of the most powerful and damaging pieces of evidence that can be offered against a witness or party. In legal lore, prior convictions seriously undercut the credibility of the witness and can derail the outcome of a trial. This Article suggests that may not always be true. This Article details the results of an empirical study of juror decision-making that challenges the conventional wisdom about prior convictions. In our study, the prior conviction evidence did not have a direct impact on the outcome of the civil trial or …


Solving Jurisdiction's Social Cost, Dustin E. Buehler Oct 2014

Solving Jurisdiction's Social Cost, Dustin E. Buehler

Washington Law Review

Federal court subject-matter jurisdiction rules incur a significant social cost—when jurisdiction is found lacking, courts must dismiss, no matter how many years and resources the parties have spent on the case. Indeed, hundreds of belated jurisdictional dismissals occur each year after parties have already engaged in discovery, dispositive motions, or even trial. Federal judges tolerate this waste largely because they view nonwaivable jurisdictional rules as a function of structural values rooted in the Constitution, rather than efficiency concerns. In contrast, scholars tend to focus primarily on efficiency arguments while discussing jurisdictional nonwaivability, de-emphasizing important structural interests. Both theories are overly …


The Legal Ethics Of Real Evidence: Of Child Porn On The Choirmaster's Computer And Bloody Knives Under The Stairs, Gregory C. Sisk Oct 2014

The Legal Ethics Of Real Evidence: Of Child Porn On The Choirmaster's Computer And Bloody Knives Under The Stairs, Gregory C. Sisk

Washington Law Review

With little guidance from the Model Rules of Professional Conduct and continuing confusion on professional obligations, questions about engagement with real evidence continue to bedevil criminal defense lawyers, incite prosecutors, generate disputes, and attract judicial attention. Where should we draw that line between what is demanded by the professional duties of zealous advocacy and client confidentiality and what constitutes obstruction of justice? When may a document or object that could conceivably be relevant in some future investigation or proceeding be destroyed, altered, or removed? May a criminal defense lawyer take possession of evidence of a crime for purposes of analysis, …


Drafting Agreements As An Attorney-Mediator: Revisiting Washington State Bar Association Advisory Opinion 2223, Caitlin Park Shin Oct 2014

Drafting Agreements As An Attorney-Mediator: Revisiting Washington State Bar Association Advisory Opinion 2223, Caitlin Park Shin

Washington Law Review

This Comment argues that Washington State Bar Association Advisory Opinion 2223 (WSBA Advisory Opinion 2223) should be revisited. WSBA Advisory Opinion 2223 reaches the unqualified conclusion that an attorney-mediator violates the Washington Rules of Professional Conduct (RPC) when drafting legal documents such as Property Settlement Agreements, Orders of Child Support, or Parenting Plans for unrepresented parties. WSBA Advisory Opinion 2223 creates confusion because it contains two significant flaws: (1) an omission of relevant comments to the RPC, and (2) an inconsistent reliance on extra-jurisdictional authority. Given WSBA Advisory Opinion 2223’s practical ramifications, the opinion should be reconsidered. Reexamining this opinion …


Miller'S Promise: Re-Evaluating Extreme Criminal Sentences For Children, Nick Straley Oct 2014

Miller'S Promise: Re-Evaluating Extreme Criminal Sentences For Children, Nick Straley

Washington Law Review

Scientific, legal, and societal notions about youth have come together to reaffirm an age-old concept—children are different and they change as they grow older. In recent decisions, the United States Supreme Court has required courts and legislatures to take a new look at extreme criminal sentences imposed upon children. Life without parole sentences and decades-long, determinate sentences are constitutionally suspect when applied to children because they fail to adequately account for the dynamism of youth. Miller v. Alabama and Graham v. Florida announced two important principles: (1) that an extreme sentence can only be imposed upon a child following an …


Outsourcing Corporate Accountability, Kishanthi Parella Oct 2014

Outsourcing Corporate Accountability, Kishanthi Parella

Washington Law Review

This Article addresses the problem of preventing human rights violations abroad that result from the globalization of business. It specifically explores the challenge of improving labor standards in global value chains. The modern business has changed dramatically and has “gone global” in order to court foreign markets and secure resources, including labor. Familiar household names, such as Nike and Apple, have “outsourced” many of their functions to suppliers overseas. As multinational buyers, they dominate one end of the global value chain. At the opposite end of the value chain are the local managers and owners of the factories and workhouses …


Hologram Images And The Entertainment Industry: New Legal Territory?, Stephen Anson Oct 2014

Hologram Images And The Entertainment Industry: New Legal Territory?, Stephen Anson

Washington Journal of Law, Technology & Arts

Modern technology allows for the holographic reproduction of a dead artist’s likeness, with the ability to perform past classic works or new original artistic works. The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival performance by the “holographic” Tupac Shakur in April 2012 dazzled an excited crowd and made the idea of bringing back deceased musical celebrities or other public personalities a reality. The use of such holographic performances is in its infancy, but the potential for possible intellectual property infringement is real and concerns the areas of copyright, trademark, and–most importantly–the right of publicity, which protects a celebrity’s name, likeness, voice …


Getting Beyond Abstract Confusion: How The United Kingdom's Jurisprudence Can Aid In Developing An Analytic Framework For Patent-Eligibility In Light Of Alice V. Cls Bank, Brendon Beheshti Oct 2014

Getting Beyond Abstract Confusion: How The United Kingdom's Jurisprudence Can Aid In Developing An Analytic Framework For Patent-Eligibility In Light Of Alice V. Cls Bank, Brendon Beheshti

Washington Journal of Law, Technology & Arts

This Article advocates consideration of the United Kingdom’s jurisprudence as persuasive authority for implementation of a new framework for analysis of subject matter eligibility of computer-implemented inventions in light of the United States Supreme Court’s ruling in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank International. The U.K.’s patent jurisprudence provides a more developed and clear analytic framework that conforms to the policy objectives of Alice, while also avoiding the conceptual problem of determining what is “abstract.” The result is a more useful and concrete analytic framework that also reduces conflicts of laws, and thus can help spur innovation across the …


Framing The Issue: Avoiding A Substantial Similarity Finding In Reproduced Visual Art, Rachael Wallace Oct 2014

Framing The Issue: Avoiding A Substantial Similarity Finding In Reproduced Visual Art, Rachael Wallace

Washington Journal of Law, Technology & Arts

Copyright issues are litigated in the United States every day. Yet attorneys representing visual artists settle suits more often when those suits involve the potential of a copyright infringement, partly because of the relatively few decisions on the matter. In Harney v. Sony Pictures, Inc., the First Circuit found that a copyrighted photograph could be copied to look nearly the same as the original because the copied elements were each unprotectable under the copyright. The copyright protected only those elements of the photo that were the result of the photographer’s choices in depicting the subject. The court held that …


Petition For A Writ Of Certiorari. Hildebrand V. Allegheny County (No. 14-363), 2014 U.S. S. Ct. Briefs Lexis 3445, Eric Schnapper, Marjorie E. Crist Sep 2014

Petition For A Writ Of Certiorari. Hildebrand V. Allegheny County (No. 14-363), 2014 U.S. S. Ct. Briefs Lexis 3445, Eric Schnapper, Marjorie E. Crist

Court Briefs

QUESTION PRESENTED Does the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, which forbids age-based discrimination against state and local government employees, preclude those employees from bringing a section 1983 action to redress age discrimination that violates the Equal Protection Clause?


Brief For Appellants. Alabama Legislative Black Caucus V. Alabama, 135 S.Ct. 1257 (2015) (No. 13-895), 2014 Wl 4059779, Eric Schnapper, James U. Blacksher, Edward Still, U.W. Clemon Aug 2014

Brief For Appellants. Alabama Legislative Black Caucus V. Alabama, 135 S.Ct. 1257 (2015) (No. 13-895), 2014 Wl 4059779, Eric Schnapper, James U. Blacksher, Edward Still, U.W. Clemon

Court Briefs

QUESTION PRESENTED

Whether Alabama’s legislative redistricting plans unconstitutionally classify black voters by race by intentionally packing them in districts designed to maintain supermajority percentages produced when 2010 census data are applied to the 2001 majority-black districts.


Brief For Respondents. Integrity Staffing Solutions, Inc. V. Busk, 135 S.Ct. 513 (2014) (No. 13-433), 2014 Wl 3866627, Mark R. Thierman, Joshua D. Buck, Eric Schnapper Aug 2014

Brief For Respondents. Integrity Staffing Solutions, Inc. V. Busk, 135 S.Ct. 513 (2014) (No. 13-433), 2014 Wl 3866627, Mark R. Thierman, Joshua D. Buck, Eric Schnapper

Court Briefs

QUESTIONS PRESENTED

(1) Does the time an hourly employee spends participating in an employer-mandated anti-theft search constitute "work" within the meaning of the Fair Labor Standards Act?

(2) If such a search occurs at the end of the workday, is the employee’s time nonetheless non-compensable as a postliminary activity under the Portal-to-Portal Act?