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Full-Text Articles in Law

Errors And Insights, Patrick Barry Oct 2020

Errors And Insights, Patrick Barry

Articles

In Seeing What Other's Don't, the psychologist Gary Klein suggests that only focusing on reducing errors limits our ability to improve. We also need to spend time increasing insights. This short essay applies Klein's approach to writing and editing.


Misbehavioral Law And Economics, Jacob Hale Russell Apr 2018

Misbehavioral Law And Economics, Jacob Hale Russell

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Many legal rules—ranging from common-law contract doctrines to modern consumer protection regulations—are designed to protect individuals from their own mistakes. But scholars have neglected a core difficulty facing such policies: we humans are a motley bunch, and we are defined in part by our idiosyncrasies. As a result, one person’s mistake is another’s ideal choice. Making matters worse, it is hard to observe when a policy response misfires. If cognitive errors and psychological biases are as prevalent as current research suggests, then we have no reliable way of knowing consumers’ true preferences. So are we always faced with a dilemma, …


What We Think, What We Know And What We Think We Know About False Convictions, Samuel Gross Jan 2017

What We Think, What We Know And What We Think We Know About False Convictions, Samuel Gross

Articles

False convictions are notoriously difficult to study because they can neither be observed when they occur nor identified after the fact by any plausible research strategy. Our best shot is to collect data on those that come to light in legal proceedings that result in the exoneration of the convicted defendants. In May 2012, the National Registry of Exonerations released its first report, covering 873 exonerations from January 1989 through February 2012. By October 15, 2016, we had added 1,027 cases: 599 exonerations since March 1, 2012, and 428 that had already happened when we issued our initial report but …


The Terrorism Exception To Asylum: Managing The Uncertainty In Status Determination, Won Kidane May 2008

The Terrorism Exception To Asylum: Managing The Uncertainty In Status Determination, Won Kidane

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The Immigration and Nationality Act ("INA "), as it must, excludes a terrorist from receiving asylum. The substantive criteria and the adjudicative procedures set forth under the INA for the identification of the undeserving terrorist inevitably exclude those who are neither terrorists nor otherwise undeserving. Such unintended consequences are perhaps unavoidable in any well-conceived statutory scheme. What is disconcerting is, however the margin of the possible error in the application of this statutory scheme. Those who may be excluded by the application of these provisions are often not those who are supposed to be excluded as terrorists. Moreover, the existing …


Mostly Harmless: An Analysis Of Post-Aedpa Federal Habeas Corpus Review Of State Harmless Error Determinations, Jeffrey S. Jacobi Feb 2007

Mostly Harmless: An Analysis Of Post-Aedpa Federal Habeas Corpus Review Of State Harmless Error Determinations, Jeffrey S. Jacobi

Michigan Law Review

Sixty years ago, in Kotteakos v. United States, the Supreme Court ruled that a small class of so-called harmless errors committed by courts did not require correction. The Court acknowledged that some judicial errors, though recognizable as errors, did not threaten the validity of criminal convictions and therefore did not quite require reversal. Specifically, the Court held that errors that violated federal statutes should be deemed harmless unless they had a "substantial and injurious effect or influence in determining the jury's verdict." While Kotteakos represented the Supreme Court's first treatment of the concept of harmlessness, other courts had a …


Lost Lives: Miscarriages Of Justice In Capital Cases, Samuel R. Gross Jan 1999

Lost Lives: Miscarriages Of Justice In Capital Cases, Samuel R. Gross

Articles

In case after case, erroneous conviction for capital murder has been proven. I contend that these are not disconnected accidents, but systematic consequences of the nature of homicice prosecution in the general and capital prosecution in particular - that in this respect, as in others, death distorts and undermines the course of the law.


Risk And Design, James E. Krier Jan 1990

Risk And Design, James E. Krier

Articles

Risk springs from uncertainty,' uncertainty invites error, and, since error can be costly, we would prefer to avoid it (provided, of course, that avoidance is not more costly yet). While there is much in the Noll and Krier article2 about judgmental error under conditions of risk and uncertainty, there is little about ways to avoid it. So avoidance-more accurately, minimization-of error costs is the topic I want to address very briefly and partially here.


Loss Of Innocence: Eyewitness Identification And Proof Of Guilt, Samuel R. Gross Jan 1987

Loss Of Innocence: Eyewitness Identification And Proof Of Guilt, Samuel R. Gross

Articles

It is no news that eyewitness identification in criminal cases is a problem; it is an old and famous problem. Judges and lawyers have long known that the identification of strangers is a chancy matter, and nearly a century of psychological research has confirmed this skeptical view. In 1967 the Supreme Court attempted to mitigate the problem by regulating the use of eyewitness identification evidence in criminal trials; since then it has retreated part way from that effort. Legal scholars have written a small library of books and articles on this problem, the courts' response to it, and various proposed …


Confession Of Error By The Solicitor General, Michigan Law Review Apr 1976

Confession Of Error By The Solicitor General, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

It is the position of this Note that the Court should formulate a new policy to govern its review of confessed errors. Specifically, this Note proposes that in deciding whether to grant certiorari and whether to defer to the representations of the Solicitor General, the Supreme Court should distinguish between errors that are normally subject to judicial scrutiny (reviewable errors) and errors of prosecutorial discretion that belong to a category of executive conduct not usually reviewed by the courts. When reviewable errors are confessed, the Court should apply a standard more liberal than that of rule 19 in deciding whether …


Practice And Procedure-Trial Practice-Juror Affidavits, Paul M.D. Harrison S. Ed. Mar 1951

Practice And Procedure-Trial Practice-Juror Affidavits, Paul M.D. Harrison S. Ed.

Michigan Law Review

The jury, in an action for trespass, returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff and thereafter separated after being dismissed by the court. Subsequently, a juror reported to the court that the verdict as returned did not express the actual agreement of the jury. Five days after dismissal the jury was recalled and, upon being polled, unanimously agreed that the verdict as returned did not represent the actual agreement of the jury due to an error in computation. The jury was sent back to the jury room under instructions to refigure the verdict only upon evidence already presented in …


Torts-Liability For Innocent Misrepresentation-Plaintiffs Reliance Nov 1932

Torts-Liability For Innocent Misrepresentation-Plaintiffs Reliance

Michigan Law Review

Defendant's agent innocently misrepresented the amount of special tax assessments on property purchased by plaintiff. Before purchase plaintiff searched the records at the office of the commissioner of finance. The records confirmed the agent's statement. However, after purchase, an error was discovered and the unpaid assessments were found to be greater than supposed. Plaintiff brought an action for damages. Held, in Moulton v. Norton that, as the representation was false in fact, plaintiff could recover though the representation had been made honestly.


Carriers-Contract Against Liability For Negligence By Telephone Company Feb 1931

Carriers-Contract Against Liability For Negligence By Telephone Company

Michigan Law Review

Plaintiff sought to recover for damages to its business resulting from the failure of defendant company to list plaintiff's main office and number and the incorrect listing of plaintiff's branch office in the 1928 telephone directory plaintiff being a subscriber to defendant's service. The contract of service contained a clause providing that defendant shall not be liable "for damages arising from errors or omissions in the making up or printing of its directory." The court held that in the absence of any showing of gross negligence or wilful misconduct; there was no liability for the omission and error. Hamilton Employment …