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Constitutional Law - Carriers - Supersedure Of State Regulations By Federal Regulations - Regulation Of Hours Of Service Of Motor Vehicular Drivers - Effect Of Federal Motor Carrier Act Of 1935, Fred C. Newman Nov 1939

Constitutional Law - Carriers - Supersedure Of State Regulations By Federal Regulations - Regulation Of Hours Of Service Of Motor Vehicular Drivers - Effect Of Federal Motor Carrier Act Of 1935, Fred C. Newman

Michigan Law Review

Defendant, whose business was chiefly interstate, violated a statute of New Hampshire which regulated the hours of service of drivers of certain motor vehicles. The violation occurred after the passage of the Federal Motor Carrier Act of 1935, which, among other things, conferred authority upon the Interstate Commerce Commission "to establish reasonable requirements with respect to . . . maximum hours of service of employees" of common and contract carriers by motor vehicle in interstate commerce. At the time of the breach of the state statute, the Interstate Commerce Commission had not prescribed regulations as to hours of service. Defendant …


Negligence - Duty To Discover Continuous Trespasser Or Bare Licensee On Railroad's Right Of Way, Michigan Law Review May 1939

Negligence - Duty To Discover Continuous Trespasser Or Bare Licensee On Railroad's Right Of Way, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

Plaintiff alleged that while he was carefully crossing defendant's right of way, on a clearly defined and well worn footpath, he was struck by defendant's engine, which was backing toward the footpath in a "stealthy manner"; that defendant's servants failed to give warning as they were accustomed to do, or keep a lookout; that the footpath had been habitually used in crossing defendant's right of way for many years, that such crossing had been constant, open, and notorious as defendant knew; and that defendant had never objected to this use. Defendant demurred. Held, demurrer sustained on the ground that …


Automobiles - Host-Guest Statutes - "Gross Negligence Or Wilful And Wanton Misconduct'', Michigan Law Review May 1939

Automobiles - Host-Guest Statutes - "Gross Negligence Or Wilful And Wanton Misconduct'', Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

Plaintiff, a guest in defendant's automobile, sustained injuries when defendant attempted to pass a car while approaching the brow of a hill and failed to see an oncoming car until too late to avoid a collision. Although the highway was heavily crowded, defendant had been driving at a speed of sixty-five to seventy miles per hour, and had been passing cars on the straight and over hills, ignoring the protests of his passengers. Defendant appealed from verdict and judgment for plaintiff. Held, with two justices dissenting, that under the statute requiring proof of defendant's "gross negligence or wilful and …


Negligence - Contributory Negligence - Last Clear Chance Doctrine Applied To The Plaintiff - Necessity Of Actual Knowledge Of Danger, John H. Uhl May 1939

Negligence - Contributory Negligence - Last Clear Chance Doctrine Applied To The Plaintiff - Necessity Of Actual Knowledge Of Danger, John H. Uhl

Michigan Law Review

The plaintiff was injured in a collision of the automobile in which she was riding, driven by her husband, and one driven by the defendant. The defendant, as an affirmative defense, alleged that as he was about to enter the intersection, his car skidded and went out of control; and that both the plaintiff and her husband saw the dangerous situation in sufficient time to have avoided the accident. The court instructed the jury that if the plaintiff or her husband saw, or by the exercise of reasonable diligence could have seen, that the defendant was in a place of …


Negligence - Proximate Cause - When Condition Created By Prior Of Successive Negligent Acts May Be The Proximate Cause, Benjamin G. Cox May 1939

Negligence - Proximate Cause - When Condition Created By Prior Of Successive Negligent Acts May Be The Proximate Cause, Benjamin G. Cox

Michigan Law Review

A railroad's employee negligently allowed plaintiff's intestate to board the wrong train and then put her off at an intermediate station to await the proper train. Coming from the waiting room later, preparatory to boarding the right train, intestate fell on the waiting room steps and suffered fatal injuries. Plaintiff sued the railroad. Held, that the employee's negligence was the proximate cause of intestate's injuries and that the employer railroad is liable. Louisville & N. R.R. v. Maddox, 236 Ala. 594, 183 So. 849 (1938).


Insurance -- Effect Of The Passenger-For-Hire Clauses On Scope Of Protection Under Automobile Insurance Policies, Benjamin G. Cox Apr 1939

Insurance -- Effect Of The Passenger-For-Hire Clauses On Scope Of Protection Under Automobile Insurance Policies, Benjamin G. Cox

Michigan Law Review

Quite common in automobile policies insuring against risks of fire, theft, collision, personal liability, etc., from the use of the automobile is a provision either effecting a termination of the policy or excluding the particular loss from the coverage of the policy if or when the automobile is used to carry passengers for hire or consideration. The full purport of this type passenger clause is unfortunately too often not realized by the insured person until he is met with a loss, unforeseen and against which he believed himself to be protected. This comment, then, will attempt an analysis of the …


Carriers - State Taxation Of Interstate Motor Carriers, Thomas K. Fisher Mar 1939

Carriers - State Taxation Of Interstate Motor Carriers, Thomas K. Fisher

Michigan Law Review

Appellant, an Ohio corporation, was engaged exclusively in interstate commerce as a common carrier of property for hire by motor vehicle. In 1937 the Georgia legislature passed a Maintenance Tax Act which provided, inter alia, for a tax, graduated according to manufacturer's rated capacity, on each motor common carrier for hire, and a tax, substantially smaller in the respective rated capacities, on each motor vehicle not used as a common carrier for hire. Appellant contested the validity of the tax on the grounds that it was repugnant to the commerce clause of the Constitution and that it violated the equal …


Carriers - Discrimination -Allowance In Lieu Of Spotting Service By Railroads -Validity Of Cease And Desist Order, Arthur P. Boynton Feb 1939

Carriers - Discrimination -Allowance In Lieu Of Spotting Service By Railroads -Validity Of Cease And Desist Order, Arthur P. Boynton

Michigan Law Review

Nine industrial corporations sought to set aside an order of the Interstate Commerce Commission commanding the railroad or railroads serving industrial plants of the plaintiffs to cease and desist from the payment of allowance for the spotting of cars and switching services performed by plaintiffs on plant facilities. They contended the commission exceeded its powers in making the order and that its findings were not supported by substantial evidence. Held, that there was substantial evidence to support the findings and that the order was valid and should be sustained. United States v. Pan American Petroleum Corp., 304 U.S. …


Criminal Law And Procedure - Essential Definiteness Of Criminal Statutes - Automobile Regulations, Robert Meisenholder Jan 1939

Criminal Law And Procedure - Essential Definiteness Of Criminal Statutes - Automobile Regulations, Robert Meisenholder

Michigan Law Review

Defendant was convicted of reckless driving under section 48 of the Illinois Uniform Traffic Act which reads, "Any person who drives any vehicle with a wilful or a wanton disregard for the safety of persons or property is guilty of reckless driving." He appealed on the ground that the statute violated the Illinois Constitution because it was too vague, indefinite, and uncertain. Held, that the statute did not violate the constitution and was a valid exercise of the police power of the legislature. People v. Green, 368 Ill. 242, 13 N. E. (2d) 278 (1938).


Interstate Commerce - Right Of State To Deny Use Of Highways To Carrier Having Certificate From Interstate Commerce Commission, Ralph Winkler Jan 1939

Interstate Commerce - Right Of State To Deny Use Of Highways To Carrier Having Certificate From Interstate Commerce Commission, Ralph Winkler

Michigan Law Review

A common carrier engaged in interstate commerce applied to the Interstate Commerce Commission for a certificate of convenience and necessity as required by section 206 of the Federal Motor Carrier Act of 1935. The carrier relied on the proviso authorizing the commission to grant a certificate without a showing of public convenience and necessity where the applicant was a carrier in bona fide operation on June 1, 1935; the statute further privileged a carrier applying for a certificate under this proviso to continue operation pending determination of its application. The State Railroad Commission of Texas earlier in 1934 had denied …