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University of Michigan Law School

State and Local Government Law

Water

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Closing The Regulatory Gap In Michigan's Public Trust Doctrine: Saving Michigan Millions With Statutory Reform, Kelsey Breck Sep 2012

Closing The Regulatory Gap In Michigan's Public Trust Doctrine: Saving Michigan Millions With Statutory Reform, Kelsey Breck

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The Great Lakes are some of Michigan's most valuable and important environmental resources. The public trust doctrine requires Michigan to protect and preserve the lands along the shores of the Great Lakes for the use of future generations. Unfortunately, the public trust doctrine in Michigan is in disarray and as a result, public and private rights to the lands along the Great Lakes are poorly delineated. This Note presents an economic argument for why the public trust doctrine should be reformed to better define public and private rights to the land along Michigan's Great Lakes. It also suggests a statutory …


Transferring Water In The American West: 1987-2005, Jedidiah Brewer, Robert Glennon, Alan Ker, Gary Libecap Jul 2007

Transferring Water In The American West: 1987-2005, Jedidiah Brewer, Robert Glennon, Alan Ker, Gary Libecap

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Rising urban and environmental demand for water has created growing pressure to re-allocate water from traditional agricultural uses. Water markets are powerful institutions for facilitating this re-allocation, yet the evolution of water markets has been more complicated than those for other resources. In this paper, we set the context for water marketing with an overview of western water law that highlights unique aspects of water law that affect how or whether a water market can develop. Second, we present new, comprehensive data on the extent, nature, and timing of water transfers across 12 western states from 1987-2005. We describe the …


Hydraulic Empire, Joseph L. Sax May 1993

Hydraulic Empire, Joseph L. Sax

Michigan Law Review

A Review of The Great Thirst: Californians and Water, 1170s-1990s by Norris Hundley, Jr.


Waters And Water Courses - No Riparian Right In Montana, Evans Holbrook Jan 1922

Waters And Water Courses - No Riparian Right In Montana, Evans Holbrook

Articles

Plaintiff owned lands through which a stream flowed; defendant, by virtue of an appropriation duly made, diverted all the water in the stream and used it for irrigation purposes. Plaintiff, claiming only as a riparian owner, sued to enjoin defendant's diversion of the stream on the ground that it was an invasion of riparian rights. Held, that the common law doctrine of riparian rights does not prevail in Montana, and that plaintiff's complaint does not state a cause of action.


Waters And Water Courses - The Effect Of The Desert Land Act Of 1877, Evans Holbrook Jan 1922

Waters And Water Courses - The Effect Of The Desert Land Act Of 1877, Evans Holbrook

Articles

The Act of March 3, 1877, generally known as the Desert Land Act, provides for the sale of desert lands to persons who agree to irrigate and cultivate such lands. The act defines desert lands as lands which will not, without some irrigation, produce crops, and provides that the Commissioner of the General Land Office shall determine what may be considered as such lands; it provides also that the right to the use of water on such lands shall depend upon appropriation, and continues as follows: "and all surplus water over and above such actual appropriation and use, together with …


Surface Water In Cities, John R. Rood Jan 1908

Surface Water In Cities, John R. Rood

Articles

It is evident that no one hard and fast rule could be applied to all cases, either in city or country, without producing injustice and impolitic results. The needs and conditions in city and country are different. They usually differ widely in different parts of the same city. These considerations have induced the Supreme Court of New Hampshire to adopt the flexible rule, that: "In determining this question all the circumstances of the case would, of course, be considered; and among them the nature and importance of the improvements sought to be made, the extent of the interference with the …


Liability Of Water Companies For Fire Losses, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1906

Liability Of Water Companies For Fire Losses, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

In two recent articles published'in this Review, the question of the liability of water companies for fire losses was somewhat exhaustively discussed. The majority of the actions wherein it has been sought to hold water companies liable for fire losses suffered by private property owners, have been brought for breach of contract. In a few cases the theory adopted was that the water company owed a duty to all property owners, by reason of the public character of its service; and the fact that it was under contract with the city to furnish an adequate water supply and pressure for …


The Liability Of Water Companies For Fire Losses, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1905

The Liability Of Water Companies For Fire Losses, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

It is a general principle, of very wide application, that a municipal corporation, in the absence of a statute, is not obliged to undertake the execution of governmental functions respecting the health, peace or property of its citizens. Nor is such corporation liable for the insufficient or negligent execution of such functions in case it undertakes to perform them. The ground of this exemption is that the municipality, in these matters, exercises discretionary powers conferred upon it by the state, and acts, not for itself in its corporate capacity, but for the general public as an agent of the central …


Title To Lands Under Fresh Water Lakes And Ponds, Thomas M. Cooley Dec 1880

Title To Lands Under Fresh Water Lakes And Ponds, Thomas M. Cooley

Articles

In the Northwestern States there are innumerable lakes and ponds, which are largely resorted to for pleasure, and for the opportunities they furnish for the taking of game and fish. The scenery about them is, in most cases, picturesque and inviting, and they become favorite locations for residence. On some the navigation is valuable for business purposes; others are navigated for pleasure only. In surveying the public domain for the purposes of sale, the government caused all that were too large to be embraced within a single subdivision of a section, to be meandered at the water line, and the …