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Comparative and Foreign Law

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Equality Adds Quality: On Upgrading Higher Education And Research In The Field Of Law, Susanne Baer Jan 2017

Equality Adds Quality: On Upgrading Higher Education And Research In The Field Of Law, Susanne Baer

Articles

Much has been attempted, and many pro1ects are still underway aimed at achieving equality in higher education and research. Today, the key argument to demand and support the integration of gender in academia is that equality is indeed about the quality on which academic work is supposed to be based. Although more or less national political, social and cultural contexts matter as much as academic environments, regarding higher education and research, the integration of gender into the field of law seems particularly interesting. Faculties of law enjoy a certain standing and status, are closely connected to power and politics, and …


Learning From The Unique And Common Challenges: Clinical Legal Education In Jordan, Nisreen Mahasneh, Kimberly A. Thomas Jan 2012

Learning From The Unique And Common Challenges: Clinical Legal Education In Jordan, Nisreen Mahasneh, Kimberly A. Thomas

Articles

Legal education worldwide is undergoing scrutiny for its failure to graduate students who have the problem-solving abilities, skills, and professional values necessary for the legal profession.1 Additionally, law schools at universities in the Middle East have found themselves in an unsettled environment, where greater demands for practical education are exacerbated by several factors such as high levels of youth unemployment. More specifically, in Jordan there is a pressing need for universities to respond to this criticism and to accommodate new or different methods of legal education. Clinical legal education is one such method.3 We use the term "clinical legal education" …


Why China?: A Startling Transformation, Nicholas C. Howson Jan 2006

Why China?: A Startling Transformation, Nicholas C. Howson

Articles

Another vantage point—the view from inside China— reveals a process of transformation even more startling and far-reaching than the external manifestations of China’s rise.


Litigation Abuse And The Law Schools, John W. Reed Jan 1983

Litigation Abuse And The Law Schools, John W. Reed

Articles

At the Ninth Circuit Judicial Conference in July, 1983, one session was devoted to a discussion of "Excessive Discovery: A Symptom of Litigation Abuse." (Without knowing, I would guess that a similar title appeared on just about every judicial conference program this year-and last year, and the one before that.) Frank Rothman, President of MGM/United Artists, addressed the subject from the point of view of a corporate client, and his remarks are printed in this issue, beginning at page 342. Judges and trial lawyers expressed their views. And I was asked to comment on the extent to which the law …


Samuel E. Thorne And Legal History In Law Schools, Delloyd J. Guth Mar 1982

Samuel E. Thorne And Legal History In Law Schools, Delloyd J. Guth

Michigan Law Review

A Review of On the Laws and Customs of England: Essays in Honor of Samuel E. Thorne edited by Morris S. Arnold, Thomas A. Green, Sally A. Scully and Stephen D. White


Foreward, Whitmore Gray Jan 1979

Foreward, Whitmore Gray

Other Publications

Over the past fifteen years there has been a remarkable growth in the study of Japanese law in the United States. The foundation was laid during the late 1950's when the Harvard-Michigan-Stanford program brought together Japanese legal specialists and their American counterparts for study and research. At the end of this program a major conference was held, and the resulting publication, Law ~ Japan, continues to serve as a point of departure in descriptive studies of Japanese law.


The Basic Course—A Mild Dissent, Whitmore Gray Jan 1971

The Basic Course—A Mild Dissent, Whitmore Gray

Articles

Perhaps it is unusual to start a discussion of a topic with a dissent from the assumption underlying its choice, but I think that in the present case this may be justified. The present topic was no doubt selected because for many years teachers have viewed the course in "comparative law" as a basic course, leading subsequently to specialized courses or research in various subject matters or geographical areas. In fact, the other two speakers on this afternoon's program, Professors Rudolf Schlesinger of Cornell and Arthur von Mehren of Harvard, are both on record in the form of their casebooks …


Legal Education In The Soviet Union And Eastern Europe, Whitmore Gray Jan 1971

Legal Education In The Soviet Union And Eastern Europe, Whitmore Gray

Articles

The following notes are based on interviews with law professors, law students and lawyers during a brief trip in 1970 to Moscow, Budapest and Prague. On previous visits in 1959 and 1965 the writer had visited law schools in Kiev, Baku, Tbilisi, Alma Ata, Leningrad, Prague and Warsaw, and had sat in on lectures, recitation sections, and examinations.1 In looking this time for changes, the writer was particularly interested in whether there was some reflection there of the general student malaise which the United States has been experiencing, manifested in American law schools in student pressure for "relevant" courses and …


The Teaching Of Practice And Procedure In Law Schools, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1913

The Teaching Of Practice And Procedure In Law Schools, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

Procedure is merely the means of co-ordinating effort, of harmonizing differences, of offering every one equality of opportunity in offense and defense before the law. Without it there would be confusion, favoritism, and injustice. If the subject were viewed in this fundamental way, and were studied conscientiously as an incident and aid to the development and determination of the merits of controversies, the criticisms now so fiercely directed against it would largely disappear. In its use it is indispensable, in its abuse only does it cause trouble. A professional conscience to curb that abuse, and professional learning and skill to …


Law As A Culture Study, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1906

Law As A Culture Study, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

That acute observer and commentator on American institutions, James Bryce, in an oft-quoted statement in his American Commonwealth, pays a high tribute to the efficiency of American law schools. "I do not know if there is anything," he writes, "in which America has advanced more beyond the mother country than in the provision she makes for legal education." In passing this generous judgment, in which many other eminent Englishmen have concurred, he views our law schools simply as institutions for developing technical proficiency among students destined to fill the ranks of the legal profession. And this is, indeed, the principal …