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University of Florida Levin College of Law

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Imperfect Insanity And Diminished Responsibility, Lea Johnston Jan 2024

Imperfect Insanity And Diminished Responsibility, Lea Johnston

UF Law Faculty Publications

Insanity’s status as an all-or-nothing excuse results in the disproportionate punishment of individuals whose mental disorders significantly impaired, but did not obliterate, their capacities for criminal responsibility. Prohibiting the trier of fact from considering impairment that does not meet the narrow definition of insanity contradicts commonly held intuitions about mental abnormality and gradations of responsibility. It results in systemic over-punishment, juror frustration, and, at times, arbitrary verdicts as triers of fact attempt to better apportion liability to blameworthiness.

This Article proposes a generic partial excuse of Diminished Responsibility from Mental Disability, to be asserted as an affirmative defense at the …


The Multitudinous Racial Harms Caused By Florida's Stop Woke And Anti-Dei Legislation, Katheryn Russell-Brown Jan 2024

The Multitudinous Racial Harms Caused By Florida's Stop Woke And Anti-Dei Legislation, Katheryn Russell-Brown

UF Law Faculty Publications

Since 2021, Florida has passed legislation that radically redefines how educators address race-related topics in the university classroom. Two laws in particular, HB 7 (Stop WOKE Act) and HB 999, which outlaws DEI programs at Florida universities, have led the charge. The goals of this Article are three-fold. First, to demonstrate how HB 7 and HB 999 have created a devasting and powerful educational force in Florida, a force that diminishes certain forms of racial discussion and inquiry in the college classroom. Second, to show the direct link between these laws and antebellum anti-literacy laws. The historical moments that separate …


Who's Afraid Of Being Woke? – Critical Theory As Awakening To Erascism And Other Injustices, Berta E. Hernández-Truyol Jan 2024

Who's Afraid Of Being Woke? – Critical Theory As Awakening To Erascism And Other Injustices, Berta E. Hernández-Truyol

UF Law Faculty Publications

Woke means “the belief there are systemic injustices in American society and the need to address them.” Ryan Newman, General Counsel to Governor of Florida.

Stopping wokeness is to combat the belief there are systemic injustices in American society which, true to form, does sound a lot like the opposite of being awake, and that is to say, totally asleep. Alex Wagner.

[B]y condemning the word “Woke” the establishment is not only attacking African American language. It also [is] disparaging the whole concept of being “awake” which I believe is one of the essential elements of moral and religious consciousness. …


Superfluous Judicial Activism: The Takings Gloss, Michael Allan Wolf May 2023

Superfluous Judicial Activism: The Takings Gloss, Michael Allan Wolf

UF Law Faculty Publications

In the summer of 2021, the Supreme Court released opinions in three Takings Clause cases. The Justices did not focus primarily on the dozen words that compose that Clause. Instead, the Court considered the expansive judicial gloss on those words, the extratextual aspects established by takings opinions over the last 100 years, since the “too far” test introduced by Justice Holmes in Pennsylvania Coal. The “Takings Gloss” is the product of holdings expanding the meaning and reach of the Takings Clause, a tangled web of opinions that have troubled lawyers, judges, and commentators for several decades. With the latest contributions, …


Justice Delayed: Government Officials' Authority To Wind Down Constitutional Violations, Neil H. Buchanan, Michael C. Dorf Mar 2023

Justice Delayed: Government Officials' Authority To Wind Down Constitutional Violations, Neil H. Buchanan, Michael C. Dorf

UF Law Faculty Publications

Upon finding that a government program is unconstitutional, courts in the United States sometimes allow executive officials a grace period to wind it down rather than insisting on its immediate cessation. Courts likewise occasionally afford a legislature a grace period to repeal an unconstitutional law. Yet no one has even attempted to explain the source of authority for allowing ongoing constitutional violations or to prescribe the limits on permissible compliance delays. Until now.

Judicial toleration of a continuing constitutional violation can be conceptualized as an exercise of the equitable discretion to withhold injunctive relief, but that rationale does not justify …


On Fires, Floods, And Federalism, Andrew Hammond Jan 2023

On Fires, Floods, And Federalism, Andrew Hammond

UF Law Faculty Publications

In the United States, law condemns poor people to their fates in states. Where Americans live continues to dictate whether they can access cash, food, and medical assistance. What’s more, immigrants, territorial residents, and tribal members encounter deteriorated corners of the American welfare state. Nonetheless, despite repeated retrenchment efforts, this patchwork of programs has proven remarkably resilient. Yet, the ability of the United States to meet its people’s most basic needs now faces an unprecedented challenge: climate change. As extreme weather events like wildfires and hurricanes become more frequent and more intense, these climate-fueled disasters will displace and impoverish more …


Macro-Judging And Article Iii Exceptionalism, Merritt E. Mcalister Jan 2023

Macro-Judging And Article Iii Exceptionalism, Merritt E. Mcalister

UF Law Faculty Publications

Over the last half-century, the federal courts have faced down two competing crises: an increase in small, low-value litigation thought unworthy of Article III attention and an increase in the numbers and complexity of “big” cases thought worthy of those resources. The choice was what to prioritize and how, and the answer the courts gave was consistent across all levels of the federal judiciary. Using what this Article calls “macro-judging,” Article III judges entrenched their own power and autonomy to focus on the work they deemed most “worthy” of their attention, while outsourcing less “important” work to an array of …


The End Of Balancing? Text, History & Tradition In First Amendment Speech Cases After Bruen, Clay Calvert, Mary-Rose Papandrea Jan 2023

The End Of Balancing? Text, History & Tradition In First Amendment Speech Cases After Bruen, Clay Calvert, Mary-Rose Papandrea

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Article examines the potential impact on First Amendment free-speech jurisprudence of the U.S. Supreme Court’s increasing reliance on text, history, and tradition in 2022 decisions such as New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Bruen. In Bruen, the Court embraced a new test for examining Second Amendment cases. It concentrates on whether there is a historical tradition of regulating the conduct in question, and it eliminates any use of constitutionally common means-end standards of review such as strict and intermediate scrutiny. Those two scrutiny standards often guide the Court’s free-speech decisions. The Bruen majority, however, asserted that its …


Deconstructing Employment Contract Law, Rachel Arnow-Richman, J.H. Verkerke Jan 2023

Deconstructing Employment Contract Law, Rachel Arnow-Richman, J.H. Verkerke

UF Law Faculty Publications

Employment contract law is an antiquated, ill-fitting, incoherent mess. But no one seems inclined to fix this problem. Employment law scholars, skeptical of employees’ ability to bargain, tend to disregard contract law and advocate for just-cause and other legislative reform. And contracts scholars largely ignore employment cases—viewing them, with some justification, as part of a peculiar, specialized body of law wholly divorced from general contract jurisprudence. As a result of this undesirable employment law exceptionalism, courts lack the tools they need to resolve recurring, real-world disputes.

This article offers a new, comprehensive historical account that exposes the formalistic and anti …


Fostering Faith: Religion In The History Of Family Policing, Elizabeth D. Katz Jan 2023

Fostering Faith: Religion In The History Of Family Policing, Elizabeth D. Katz

UF Law Faculty Publications

Each year in the United States, approximately 700,000 children live in foster care. Many of these children are placed in religiously oriented homes recruited and overseen by faith-based agencies (FBAs). This arrangement—as well as the scope and operation of child welfare services more broadly—is at a crucial moment of reckoning. Scholars and advocates focused on children’s rights and family integrity maintain that the child welfare system, increasingly termed the “family policing system,” harms children, families, and communities through unnecessary and racist child removal that is partly motivated by perverse financial incentives. Some call for abolition. Meanwhile, in a largely separate …


Florida's Baker Act Laws: How Florida's Excessive Use Of Baker Acts Can Be Harmful To Children, Kaitlin Gibbs Jan 2023

Florida's Baker Act Laws: How Florida's Excessive Use Of Baker Acts Can Be Harmful To Children, Kaitlin Gibbs

Gator TeamChild Juvenile Law Clinic

The goal of this White Paper is to provide an overview of Florida’s Baker Act Laws. Additionally, this White Paper will show how the excessive use of Baker Acts in Florida can have harmful effects on children, especially those in the dependency system, and potential solutions to reform the Baker Act process.


Everything You Want: The Paradox Of Customized Intellectual Property Regimes, Derek E. Bambauer Jan 2023

Everything You Want: The Paradox Of Customized Intellectual Property Regimes, Derek E. Bambauer

UF Law Faculty Publications

Special interest groups share a dream: enacting legislation customized for, and hopefully drafted by, their industry. Customized rules created via legislative capture, though, are the worst case scenario from a public choice perspective: they enable narrow interests to capture rents without generating sufficient societal benefits. American intellectual property law offers useful case studies in legislative capture: special interests have created their own rules three times in the past forty years with the Semiconductor Chip Protection Act, Audio Home Recording Act, and Vessel Hull Design Protection Act. Paradoxically, though, these customized IP systems have consistently disappointed their drafters: all three of …


How Reputational Nondisclosure Agreements Fails (Or, In Praise Of Breach), Mark Fenster Jan 2023

How Reputational Nondisclosure Agreements Fails (Or, In Praise Of Breach), Mark Fenster

UF Law Faculty Publications

Investigative reporters and the #MeToo movement exposed the widespread use of non-disclosure agreements intended to maintain confidentiality about one or both contracting parties’ embarrassing acts. These reputational NDAs (RNDAs) have been widely condemned and addressed in the past half-decade by legislators, activists, and academics. Their exposure, often via victims’ breaches, revealed a curious and distinct dilemma for the non-breaching party whose reputation is vulnerable to disclosure. In most contracts, non-breaching parties might choose to forgo enforcement because of the cost and uncertain success of litigation and the availability of other pathways to a satisfactory resolution. Parties to a RNDA, by …


Bottom-Rung Appeals, Merritt E. Mcalister Jan 2023

Bottom-Rung Appeals, Merritt E. Mcalister

UF Law Faculty Publications

There are haves and have-nots in the federal appellate courts, and the haves get more attention. For decades the courts have used a triage regime where they distribute judicial attention selectively: some appeals receive a lot of judicial attention, some appeals receive barely any. What this work unearths is that this triage system produces demonstrably unequal results depending on the circuit handling the appeal and whether the appellant has counsel or not. Together, these two factors produce dramatic disparities: in one circuit, for example, an unrepresented appellant receives, on average, a decision less than a tenth the length of a …


Privacy Implications Of Central Bank Digital Currency, Jiaying Jiang Jan 2023

Privacy Implications Of Central Bank Digital Currency, Jiaying Jiang

UF Law Faculty Publications

One hundred five countries, representing over 95 percent of global GDP, are exploring central bank digital currencies (CBDCs), a new form of digital money that is different from privately issued cryptocurrencies and stablecoins. As central banks worldwide grapple with CBDC design options, privacy has become a critical feature and concern. Many central banks, government agencies, NGOs, think tanks, and even the general public have already addressed the importance of privacy and called for privacy in CBDC systems. Some economists, computer scientists, engineers, and legal scholars have already moved forward to design a privacy-preserving CBDC.

However, when addressing the importance and …


Diminished Criminal Responsibility: A Multinational Comparative Review, Lea Johnston, Kendall D. Runyan, Fernando José Silva, Franscisco Maldonado Fuentes Jan 2023

Diminished Criminal Responsibility: A Multinational Comparative Review, Lea Johnston, Kendall D. Runyan, Fernando José Silva, Franscisco Maldonado Fuentes

UF Law Faculty Publications

This article reviews the legal frameworks of diminished criminal responsibility in eighteen civil law jurisdictions across the globe—Brazil, Chile, China, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, and Turkey. Specifically, it reports the legal standards and main features of partial responsibility, associated penalty reductions, and potential dispositions following a partial responsibility finding. It also surveys empirical data on the prevalence of diminished responsibility as compared to criminal nonresponsibility. This article, which reflects contemporary penal codes and draws from both English and non-English sources, is the only known existing source to compile …


Delaware Law For Non-Corporate Entities: A Commentary, Peter Molk Jan 2023

Delaware Law For Non-Corporate Entities: A Commentary, Peter Molk

UF Law Faculty Publications

Robert Rhee’s Article, The Irrelevance of Delaware Corporate Law, poses provocative questions about why Delaware dominates the market for corporate law given the apparent irrelevance of state incorporation choice for companies’ market valuations. He shows, first, that publicly traded companies incorporated in Delaware have similar valuations to companies incorporated in other states over time, and second, that market actors do not exhibit a preference to reincorporate existing firms in Delaware.

Rhee analyzes exclusively the realm of publicly traded corporations, which is understandable given that his analysis is necessarily limited to publicly available data. Publicly traded corporations are undeniably economically significant, …


Bespoke, Tailored, And Off-The-Rack Bankruptcy: A Response To Professor Coordes's 'Bespoke Bankruptcy', Christopher D. Hampson Jan 2023

Bespoke, Tailored, And Off-The-Rack Bankruptcy: A Response To Professor Coordes's 'Bespoke Bankruptcy', Christopher D. Hampson

UF Law Faculty Publications

Toward the end of every semester that I teach bankruptcy, I let my students vote on which “non-traditional” insolvency regimes they would like to study, including municipal bankruptcy, sovereign bankruptcy, and financial institutions. What I am really trying to do is convey to the students that the default procedures and substantive rules in Chapters 7 and 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code do not apply to all types of enterprises.


Dead Infants And Taking The Fifth, Tracey Maclin Jan 2023

Dead Infants And Taking The Fifth, Tracey Maclin

UF Law Faculty Publications

This article is part of a symposium dedicated to the life and scholarship of Professor Sherry Colb. Professor Colb was a brilliant legal scholar and an admired teacher. Professor Colb and I first bonded over the fact that we both taught Constitutional Criminal Procedure.

In a 2013 blog, Professor Colb took a limited view of the Fifth Amendment’s Self-Incrimination Clause. She contended that if official brutality and false confessions could be eliminated, the rationale for giving people the right to refuse to provide truthful information about their own actions in open court would diminish substantially.

As someone who supports a …


Covid Aftermath: The Impact Of The Pandemic On Florida's Public School Students, Hannah Blount, Michael Figg, Autumn Finke, Christina Gilbert, Mackenzie O'Connell, Nyasia Minaya, Kylee Neeranjan, Alyssa Rodriguez Dec 2022

Covid Aftermath: The Impact Of The Pandemic On Florida's Public School Students, Hannah Blount, Michael Figg, Autumn Finke, Christina Gilbert, Mackenzie O'Connell, Nyasia Minaya, Kylee Neeranjan, Alyssa Rodriguez

Gator TeamChild Juvenile Law Clinic

The goal of this White Paper is to provide an overview of the current and future impacts the COVID-19 pandemic (“COVID”) has left on Florida’s public school education system. Additionally, this White Paper review shows how public education institutions are still working to address the loss of instructional time and long-term consequences due to pandemic-related school disruptions.


The Mortgagee Looks At The Commercial Lease, Seneca B. Anderson Sep 2022

The Mortgagee Looks At The Commercial Lease, Seneca B. Anderson

Florida Law Review

No abstract provided.


Rehabilitation Of The Insolvent Wage Earner Under The Bankruptcy Act In Florida, Charles Elihu Nadler Sep 2022

Rehabilitation Of The Insolvent Wage Earner Under The Bankruptcy Act In Florida, Charles Elihu Nadler

Florida Law Review

No abstract provided.


Secured Creditors In Bankruptcy Under Florida Law, Harold Friedman Sep 2022

Secured Creditors In Bankruptcy Under Florida Law, Harold Friedman

Florida Law Review

No abstract provided.


Why We Need The Uniform Commercial Code, Karl N. Llewellyn Sep 2022

Why We Need The Uniform Commercial Code, Karl N. Llewellyn

Florida Law Review

No abstract provided.


Banks' Liability In Handling Accounts Of Decedents And Fiduciaries, Richard M. Lund Sep 2022

Banks' Liability In Handling Accounts Of Decedents And Fiduciaries, Richard M. Lund

Florida Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Presentment Problem In The Collection Of Checks Through Banks, Dexter Delony Sep 2022

The Presentment Problem In The Collection Of Checks Through Banks, Dexter Delony

Florida Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Foreign Corporation, An Elusive Defendant, Edwin Presser, James E. Cobb Sep 2022

The Foreign Corporation, An Elusive Defendant, Edwin Presser, James E. Cobb

Florida Law Review

No abstract provided.


Severance Damage In Eminent Domain Proceedings, Sheldon J. Plager, Aubrey V. Kendall Sep 2022

Severance Damage In Eminent Domain Proceedings, Sheldon J. Plager, Aubrey V. Kendall

Florida Law Review

No abstract provided.


Proper Payment Under The Florida Mechanics' Lien Law, William F. Simonet, I. R. Ludacer Sep 2022

Proper Payment Under The Florida Mechanics' Lien Law, William F. Simonet, I. R. Ludacer

Florida Law Review

No abstract provided.


Florida's Streams--Water Rights In A Water Wonderland, Sheldon J. Plager, Frank E. Maloney Sep 2022

Florida's Streams--Water Rights In A Water Wonderland, Sheldon J. Plager, Frank E. Maloney

Florida Law Review

No abstract provided.