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Full-Text Articles in Law

Toward Principled Background Principles In Takings Law, Rebecca Hansen, Lior Jacob Strahilevitz Mar 2023

Toward Principled Background Principles In Takings Law, Rebecca Hansen, Lior Jacob Strahilevitz

Texas A&M Law Review

Oversights by lawyers, judges, and legal scholars have caused the Supreme Court’s opinion in Cedar Point Nursery v. Hassid to be deeply misunderstood. In Cedar Point, the Court rewrote much of takings law by treating temporary and part-time entries by the government or third parties onto private property as per se takings. Prior to Cedar Point, these sorts of government-authorized physical entries would have been evaluated under a balancing framework that almost invariably enabled the government to prevail. As it happens, there was a well-established rule of black letter law that California’s lawyers and amici failed to invoke …


Things Invisible To See: State Action & Private Property, Joseph William Singer, Isaac Saidel-Goley Jun 2018

Things Invisible To See: State Action & Private Property, Joseph William Singer, Isaac Saidel-Goley

Texas A&M Law Review

This Article revisits the state action doctrine, a judicial invention that shields “private” or “non-governmental” discrimination from constitutional scrutiny. Traditionally, this doctrine has applied to discrimination even in places of public accommodation, like restaurants, hotels, and grocery stores. Born of overt racial discrimination, the doctrine has inflicted substantial injustice throughout its inglorious history, and courts have continuously struggled in vain to coherently apply the doctrine. Yet, the United States Supreme Court has not fully insulated “private” or “horizontal” relations among persons from constitutional scrutiny. The cases in which it has applied constitutional norms to non-governmental actors should be celebrated rather …


Disseisin, Doubt, And Debate: Adverse Possession Scholarship In The United States (1881-1986), John Lovett Jan 2018

Disseisin, Doubt, And Debate: Adverse Possession Scholarship In The United States (1881-1986), John Lovett

Texas A&M Law Review

Property law scholars in the United States have discussed the doctrine of adverse possession for more than a century. Indeed, ever since American property law scholars began to write property law treatises, formalize property law courses in modern law schools, publish property specific articles in law reviews, and publish property law case books, adverse possession has served as a staple of property law discourse. This Article examines how property law scholars think about and discuss adverse possession. It explores how adverse possession talk has changed—and not changed—over time. In other words, this Article examines both the substance and rhetoric of …


Recognizing Challenges And Opportunities In The Quest To End Hunger, Jennifer Williams Zwagerman Sep 2017

Recognizing Challenges And Opportunities In The Quest To End Hunger, Jennifer Williams Zwagerman

Texas A&M Law Review

As an attorney and professor that does not focus on intellectual property law, I was a bit apprehensive about providing a keynote address for a Symposium focusing on “Agriculture, Intellectual Property, and Feeding the World in the 21st Century.” As I thought about this topic, knowing that there were other speakers who would focus more on the IP issues and technical aspects of various topics, I kept coming back to the importance of technology as we worktowards the goal of feeding the world, and the many ways in which innovation plays a role in meeting that goal. It also brought …


Where We're Going, We'll Need Roads! Building The Bridge To The Future: Public-Private Partnerships For Future Border Infrastructure Development, Jessica R. Lesnau Sep 2017

Where We're Going, We'll Need Roads! Building The Bridge To The Future: Public-Private Partnerships For Future Border Infrastructure Development, Jessica R. Lesnau

Texas A&M Law Review

In a world where global economies are increasingly interdependent, the United States, and its North American counterparts, Canada and Mexico, are booming sources of international trade. Now, more than ever, global competitiveness necessitates developments in U.S. infrastructure, especially at major border crossings where congestion and poor infrastructure create bottlenecks interfering with the free movement of goods. Questions pertaining to international border crossings circle the debate at the most crucial international border crossing in North America: the Ambassador Bridge, which spans the Detroit River between Detroit, Michigan, and Windsor, Ontario. A legal battle rages over the proposed construction of a new …


Fixed Vs.Floating Non-Participating Oil & Gas Royalty In Texas: And The Battles Rage On . . ., Christopher S. Kulander Jan 2016

Fixed Vs.Floating Non-Participating Oil & Gas Royalty In Texas: And The Battles Rage On . . ., Christopher S. Kulander

Texas A&M Law Review

The author discusses fixed and floating non-participating oil and gas royalty in Texas and concludes that royalty cases will continue to be heard by the courts.