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In Search Of Best Practices On Gender Equity For University Faculty: An Update, Constance Z. Wagner Jan 2019

In Search Of Best Practices On Gender Equity For University Faculty: An Update, Constance Z. Wagner

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This article updates the author’s earlier work on the search for gender equity among women faculty in the university setting in the United States. The author reflects on the fact that some of the literature in this area does not sufficiently address the challenges facing women of color. She seeks to fill the gap in her own research by referencing best practices discussed in three recent books on the professional lives of university faculty who are women of color. She argues that future work on best practices for achieving gender equity must address issues of intersectionality of race, gender ...


Are Universities Schools? The Case For Continuity In The Regulation Of Student Speech, Chad Flanders Oct 2018

Are Universities Schools? The Case For Continuity In The Regulation Of Student Speech, Chad Flanders

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Are universities schools? The question seems almost silly to ask: o f course universities are schools. They have teachers and students, like schools. They have grades, like schools. There are classes and extracurricular activities, also like schools. But recent writings on the issue of 04 free speech on campus" have raised the improbable specter that universities are less educational institutions than they are public forums like parks and sidewalks, where a free-wheeling exchange o f ideas and opinions takes place, unrestricted by any sense of academic mission or school disciplinc.1 Some of this rhetoric is of course exaggerated, and ...


Teaching The Transformative Fourteenth Amendment, Joel K. Goldstein Jan 2018

Teaching The Transformative Fourteenth Amendment, Joel K. Goldstein

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If the constitutional law casebooks are a reliable guide, most teach the Fourteenth Amendment, like other parts of the Constitution, by presenting separately the various doctrinal topics it has raised.[1] The principal clauses of the Amendment, or really those in the second sentence of Section 1[2]—the Equal Protection, Due Process, and Privileges or Immunities Clauses—are generally extracted from its text and classes are structured around the leading cases decided under each and the resulting doctrine. Cases under the Equal Protection or Due Process Clause may be further separated. Based on the class of claimants, for instance ...


A Human Rights Code Of Conduct: Ambitious Moral Aspiration For A Public Interest Law Office Or Law Clinic, Lauren Bartlett Jan 2017

A Human Rights Code Of Conduct: Ambitious Moral Aspiration For A Public Interest Law Office Or Law Clinic, Lauren Bartlett

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The standards regulating the decision-making and behavior of lawyers in the U.S. currently provide inadequate guidance for many of the ethical dilemmas that practicing attorneys face on a daily basis. Universal human rights principles—the concepts of morality underlying much of human rights law—provide more ambitious moral direction that lawyers can use to guide decision-making and behavior. This article discusses why additional aspirational goals are needed for the legal profession and explains how and why to apply universal human rights principles to lawyering in the U.S. The article goes on to introduce the idea of adopting a ...


Bridging The Gap: A Joint Negotiation Project Crossing Legal Disciplines, K. E. Powell, Lauren Bartlett Jan 2017

Bridging The Gap: A Joint Negotiation Project Crossing Legal Disciplines, K. E. Powell, Lauren Bartlett

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This article discusses the creation and implementation of a cross-discipline negotiation simulation project designed by two law professors at Ohio Northern University Claude W. Pettit College of Law. The project bridged the gap between podium classes and clinical experience, exposing two separate groups of students to new subject areas. Professors Lauren E. Bartlett and Karen Powell brought together two distinct law classes, one doctrinal tax class and one pretrial litigation skills class, to exercise legal skills, and learn substantive and procedural law from their classmates, while acting as an attorney or a client in a simulated negotiation.


Teaching "Ferguson", Chad Flanders Nov 2015

Teaching "Ferguson", Chad Flanders

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What we now refer to simply as "Ferguson" erupted in August of 20T4 and immediately raised a cluster o f legal issues. What crime had Michael Brown allegedly committed? Did Officer Darren Wilson commit a crime when he shot at Brown? Protests ensued, and they in turn inspired a police response, a response that seemed to many more violent than the protests themselves. What of the First Amendment rights o f the protesters and o f the journalists covering them? What laws were they-protestors and some journalists-supposedly breaking?1

As the days and weeks passed, the legal issues multiplied, and ...


Shifting The Lens: A Primer For Incorporating Social Work Theory And Practice To Improve Outcomes For Clients With Mental Health Issues And Law Students Who Represent Them, Susan Mcgraugh, Carrie Hagan, Lauren Choate Jan 2014

Shifting The Lens: A Primer For Incorporating Social Work Theory And Practice To Improve Outcomes For Clients With Mental Health Issues And Law Students Who Represent Them, Susan Mcgraugh, Carrie Hagan, Lauren Choate

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This Essay is an effort to promote the inclusion of interdisciplinary practice in our work as attorneys and in our roles as clinical legal professors. As the legal community continues its renewed emphasis on skills training, law schools should look to other professions in order to produce more lasting solutions for our clients and for more satisfactory outcomes for our lawyers. In this Essay, the authors discuss their work incorporating social work theory and practice into clinical legal education when dealing with clients who have serious mental illness. With some studies reporting up to 64.2% of inmates in the ...


Creating And Teaching A Specialized Legal Research Course: The Benefits And Considerations, Erika Cohn Jan 2014

Creating And Teaching A Specialized Legal Research Course: The Benefits And Considerations, Erika Cohn

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This article outlines the author's experience creating and teaching a specialized legal research course. It includes the reasons for offering such a course, tips for selecting a topic and developing a syllabus, getting the course approved, creating student interest, developing a teaching plan, and evaluating the course.


Bramble Bush Revisited: Karl Llewellyn, The Great Depression, And The First Law School Crisis, 1929-1939, Anders Walker Jan 2013

Bramble Bush Revisited: Karl Llewellyn, The Great Depression, And The First Law School Crisis, 1929-1939, Anders Walker

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This article recovers the plight of legal education during the Great Depression, showing how debates over practical training, theoretical research and the appropriate length of law school all emerged in the 1930s. Using Bramble Bush author Karl Llewellyn as a guide, it strives to make three points. One, Depression-era critics of law school called for increased attention to practical skills, like today, but also a more interdisciplinary curriculum – something current reformers discount. Two, the push for theoretical, policy-oriented courses in the 1930s set the stage for claims that law graduates deserved more than a Bachelor of Laws degree, bolstering the ...


The Lawyer's Toolbox: Teaching Students About Risk Allocation, Dana Malkus, Scott Stevenson, Eric J. Gouvin, Usha Rodrigues Jan 2013

The Lawyer's Toolbox: Teaching Students About Risk Allocation, Dana Malkus, Scott Stevenson, Eric J. Gouvin, Usha Rodrigues

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This Article is the transcript of a panel presented at Emory’s Third Biennial Conference on Transactional Education. The panel focuses on techniques for teaching risk allocation as part of transactional skills classes. The panelists describe their approaches to teaching risk allocation, from syllabus design to final evaluations. How can a professor help students to understand the basic concepts of risk, the role risk plays in business and legal decisions, and how they can help clients manage risk. The techniques for teaching risk allocation include hypotheticals, visual aids, and hands-on assignments. The panelists each take their students down a different ...


Identifying (With) Disability: Using Film To Teach Employment Discrimination, Elizabeth Pendo Jan 2013

Identifying (With) Disability: Using Film To Teach Employment Discrimination, Elizabeth Pendo

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Building on a prior article about using film to teach health law, this Essay is intended to share my experience using the film Philadelphia as a method of enhancing coverage and discussion of the employment provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and to provide an opportunity for recognition of, and identification with, the experiences of people with disabilities.


From Podcasts To Treasure Hunts— Using Technology To Promote Student Engagement, Marcia L. Mccormick Jan 2013

From Podcasts To Treasure Hunts— Using Technology To Promote Student Engagement, Marcia L. Mccormick

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Three influential calls for reform in legal education, the MacCrate Report, the Carnegie Report, and most recently the Stuckey Report, have all recommended that professors use teaching methods to provide greater opportunities for students to practice problem solving skills and receive feedback on their performance. Being a lawyer is much more than memorizing rules; students need to be able to understand the big picture and use the details to problem solve. This article details how to use audio and written podcast summaries to help students see the big picture in a subject and how each smaller topic fits together into ...


The Law Review Games, Miriam A. Cherry, Paul M. Secunda Jan 2012

The Law Review Games, Miriam A. Cherry, Paul M. Secunda

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A Parody in which The Hunger Games meet the law review submission process.


American Legal History Survey: Syllabus, Anders Walker Jan 2012

American Legal History Survey: Syllabus, Anders Walker

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This syllabus provides an overview of American Legal History, focusing on the manner in which law has been used to organize American society. Several themes will be traced through the semester, including law’s role in encouraging innovation and regulating social relations, in part through the elaboration of legal disciplines like property, tort, contract, criminal law, tax, business associations, administrative law, environmental law, securities regulation, commercial law, immigration, and health law. Emphasis will also be placed on the origins and evolution of constitutional law, from the founding to the present.


Beyond The Tide: Beginning Admiralty With The Steamboat Magnolia, Joel K. Goldstein Jan 2011

Beyond The Tide: Beginning Admiralty With The Steamboat Magnolia, Joel K. Goldstein

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Admiralty is potentially one of the richest subjects in the law school curriculum. This claim may be received skeptically by those who have neither taught nor taken the course. Yet my experience as a student in, and teacher of, the course confirms my belief that Admiralty holds that promise, especially if it is presented not simply as a vehicle to train the relatively few who hope to become maritime lawyers, but as an opportunity for students with different aspirations to explore some of the most interesting issues in law. As a crosscutting course, Admiralty offers a chance to integrate materials ...


Does It Matter What We Say About Legal Interpretation?, Karen Petroski Jan 2011

Does It Matter What We Say About Legal Interpretation?, Karen Petroski

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Despite a common interest in justifying their scholarly output, legal academics have resisted seeing how their work is molded by the institutional environment in which it is produced, and not just by legal doctrine, ideology, or individual perspectives. This paper presents a case study from this neglected perspective, considering the shape of scholarship on legal interpretation in light of the social conditions of its production. After a brief discussion of the debates over whether scholarship (and which scholarship) matters, the paper explores how such concerns are addressed in various academic accounts of scholars’ textual practices. It then offers some initial ...


A Dean Of Character, Joel K. Goldstein Jan 2010

A Dean Of Character, Joel K. Goldstein

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Jeff Lewis’s deanship will be remembered for the tangible contributions it made to the development of Saint Louis University School of Law (the School) and to the University of which it is an important part. The size of the faculty increased dramatically through entry-level and lateral hiring (the latter something rarely done before). More resources were made available to support faculty scholarly activities. The School intensified its commitment to clinical and practical skills training, the curriculum was expanded and arranged in a coherent manner to better prepare students for practice, and small-section classes were introduced. The School’s program ...


Becoming A Law Professor: A Candidate's Guide, Brannon P. Denning, Marcia L. Mccormick, Jeffrey M. Lipshaw Jan 2010

Becoming A Law Professor: A Candidate's Guide, Brannon P. Denning, Marcia L. Mccormick, Jeffrey M. Lipshaw

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This is the Table of Contents and the Introduction to a forthcoming book from the American Bar Association. The authors provide detailed advice and resources for aspiring law professors, including a description of the categories of law faculty (and what they do), possible paths to careers in the legal academy, and "how to" guides for filling out the AALS's Faculty Appointments Register, interviewing at the Faculty Recruitment Conference (the "meat market"), issues for non-traditional candidates, dealing with callbacks and job offers, and getting ready for the first semester on the job.


The One State Solution To Teaching Criminal Law, Or Leaving The Common Law And The Mpc Behind, Chad Flanders Jan 2010

The One State Solution To Teaching Criminal Law, Or Leaving The Common Law And The Mpc Behind, Chad Flanders

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How should criminal law be taught to first-year law students? Professors preparing their classes for the first time, and even veterans of many semesters of criminal law, find themselves facing a dilemma. On the one hand, the common law is no longer good - law in nearly every state; it has been superseded by statute. Even states that leave a large role for the common law usually have a combination of common law and statutory law or strongly limit the scope of the common law. On the other hand, there is no uniform code that actually exists as law in all ...


A Service Learning Project: Disability, Access And Health Care, Elizabeth Pendo Jan 2010

A Service Learning Project: Disability, Access And Health Care, Elizabeth Pendo

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Last summer, I was thinking about a public service project for my disability discrimination law course. I teach the course in fall, and try to incorporate a project each year. At the same time, I was working on a project looking at barriers to health care for people with disabilities. Some of the barriers are well known, such as lower average incomes, disproportionate poverty, and issues with insurance coverage, to name just a few. I was looking at barriers of a different type, however: those posed by physically inaccessible facilities and equipment. This was a new area for me. Like ...


In Forma Pauperis, Sec. 514.040: A Practical User's Guide For Attorneys, Christine E. Rollins Jan 2010

In Forma Pauperis, Sec. 514.040: A Practical User's Guide For Attorneys, Christine E. Rollins

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Missouri attorneys have the ability to have costs and fees waived for their indigent clients.


The Anti-Case Method: Herbert Wechsler And The Political History Of The Criminal Law Course, Anders Walker Jan 2009

The Anti-Case Method: Herbert Wechsler And The Political History Of The Criminal Law Course, Anders Walker

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This article is the first to recover the dramatic transformation in criminal law teaching away from the case method and towards a more open-ended philosophical approach in the 1930s. It makes three contributions. One, it shows how Columbia Law Professor Herbert Wechsler revolutionized the teaching of criminal law by de-emphasizing cases and including a variety of non-case related material in his 1940 text Criminal Law and Its Administration. Two, it reveals that at least part of Wechsler's intention behind transforming criminal law teaching was to undermine Langdell's case method, which he blamed for producing a "closed-system" view of ...


Using The Vark: A Writing Department’S Commitment To “Turning The Light Bulbs On”, Christine E. Rollins Apr 2008

Using The Vark: A Writing Department’S Commitment To “Turning The Light Bulbs On”, Christine E. Rollins

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Writing faculty at Saint Louis University have developed a teaching approach which is tailored to fit the learning styles of their students.


Foreword, Joel K. Goldstein Jan 2007

Foreword, Joel K. Goldstein

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Thomas F. Eagleton was an original. Many found him to be one of the most compelling and admirable people they had ever encountered. That was certainly my experience as I came to know him during the last few years of his life. And he certainly made a strong, favorable impression on the students we taught together at Saint Louis University School of Law in our seminar on the Presidency and the Constitution.


Open Access In Law Teaching: A New Approach To Legal Education, Matthew T. Bodie Jan 2006

Open Access In Law Teaching: A New Approach To Legal Education, Matthew T. Bodie

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The "open access" movement seeks to change our approach to the distribution of scholarship in the fields of science, medicine, the social sciences, and law. This Essay argues for the application of these principles to legal education itself. Open access would mean greater flexibility, interaction, and innovation in the creation of course materials. It would lead to new teaching methods and new forms of feedback between student and professor. Open access centers on particular legal subject areas could facilitate national and international collaboration. Ultimately, the open access law school would ameliorate the growing standardization and commodification of legal education by ...


Approaches To Brown V. Board Of Education: Some Notes On Teaching A Seminal Case, Joel K. Goldstein Jan 2005

Approaches To Brown V. Board Of Education: Some Notes On Teaching A Seminal Case, Joel K. Goldstein

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During the past year, dozens of American law schools commemorated the
fiftieth anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education.[1] The attention was
appropriate because Brown is one of the Supreme Court’s seminal decisions.
By all appearances, the fiftieth anniversary of Brown attracted much more
attention than did, say, the 200th anniversary of Marbury v. Madison [2] in 2003
or the centennial of Lochner v. New York [3] this year. Brown’s unique
significance resides in part in the fact that it changed America’s constitutional norm regarding race, our most embarrassing and vexing problem. In effectively overturning the ...


Telling Stories About Health Insurance: Using New Films In The Classroom, Elizabeth Pendo Jan 2005

Telling Stories About Health Insurance: Using New Films In The Classroom, Elizabeth Pendo

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In keeping with the Symposium theme, "The Mass Media's Influence on Health Law and Policy," this essay is designed to share my experience using clips from three recent popular films as a method of enhancing coverage and discussion of legal and policy issues surrounding the private health insurance system, and to provide some practical advice for others interested in doing the same. Specific topics include the erosion of employer-sponsored health insurance, continuation of private coverage under COBRA and HIPAA, public health care programs, physician incentives, the uninsured and access to care and legal remedies for claim denial. This essay ...


The Five Stages Of Law Review Submission, Brannon P. Denning, Miriam A. Cherry Jan 2005

The Five Stages Of Law Review Submission, Brannon P. Denning, Miriam A. Cherry

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"The Five Stages of Law Review Submissions," is a humorous look at the law review submissions process from the author's perspective. My colleague Miriam Cherry and I suggest that the process of submitting to law reviews tracks Elisabeth Kubler-Ross's "five stages of grief."


The Future Of The Casebook: An Argument For An Open-Source Approach, Matthew T. Bodie Jan 2005

The Future Of The Casebook: An Argument For An Open-Source Approach, Matthew T. Bodie

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Despite dramatic technological change, the thick, attractively bound casebook remains ensconced as the written centerpiece of legal education. That will soon change - but its replacement has not been established. This paper argues that the legal academy should take this opportunity to implement an open source approach to future course materials. Guided by analysis and examples of commons-based peer production such as open source software, professors could establish electronic commons casebooks with a myriad of materials for every course. These joint databases would unshackle individual creativity while engendering collaboration on levels previously impossible. Although there may be concerns that such a ...


A Tyrannosaurus-Rex Aptly Named 'Sue': Using A Disputed Dinosaur To Teach Contract Defenses, Miriam A. Cherry Jan 2004

A Tyrannosaurus-Rex Aptly Named 'Sue': Using A Disputed Dinosaur To Teach Contract Defenses, Miriam A. Cherry

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This piece focuses on the discovery of a T-Rex skeleton, and the contract formed between the private fossil collectors and the Native American rancher who ostensibly owned the land where the fossil was situated. Although the fossil was eventually sold at auction for over eight million dollars, the fossil collectors paid the rancher only $5,000 for its excavation. In addition to the rancher, the Sioux tribe and the Department of Justice also became involved in the case.

As described in my work, the law school Socratic method has come under attack in recent years. In response to such criticisms ...