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Full-Text Articles in Law

Effectuating Change In The Regulation Of Hiv Vaccines, Scott M. Engstrom Jan 2013

Effectuating Change In The Regulation Of Hiv Vaccines, Scott M. Engstrom

Scott M Engstrom

HIV has been at the forefront in politics, medicine, and law since its discovery in 1981. Over thirty years have passed since the virus began a wave of fear made worse by a sensationalist media. Though much of the uproar has dulled, the lasting effects on the American Psyche have remained as the AIDS death toll has risen. Although the medical community has made significant progress in managing the infection through complex drug cocktails, prevention remains the most effective tool in the fight against AIDS. However, the old aphorism “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” has …


Our Illegal Founders, Victor C. Romero Jan 2013

Our Illegal Founders, Victor C. Romero

Journal Articles

This Essay briefly mines America’s history to argue that the law setting forth where our national borders are and how strictly we patrol them has always been subject to the vagaries of politics, economics, and perception. Illegal (im)migration has long been part of our migration history, engaged in not just by Latin American border crossers, but also by prominent colonists, giving the lie to the claim that upholding border laws should always be sacrosanct. In many school districts today, the usual summary of American history from our childhood civics classes no longer bypasses the uncomfortable truths of conquest and westward …


Reading (Into) Windsor: Presidential Leadership, Marriage Equality, And Immigration Policy, Victor C. Romero Jan 2013

Reading (Into) Windsor: Presidential Leadership, Marriage Equality, And Immigration Policy, Victor C. Romero

Journal Articles

Following the demise of the federal Defense of Marriage Act in United States v. Windsor, the Obama Administration directed a bold, equality-based reading of Windsor to immigration law, treating bi-national same-sex couples the same as opposite-sex couples. This Essay argues that the President's interpretation is both constitutionally and politically sound: Constitutionally, because it comports with the Executive's power to enforce immigration law and to guarantee equal protection under the law; and politically, because it reflects the current, increasingly tolerant view of marriage equality. Though still in its infancy, President Obama's policy of treating same-sex beneficiary petitions generally the same as …