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Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Law

Mandatory Process, Matthew J.B. Lawrence Oct 2015

Mandatory Process, Matthew J.B. Lawrence

Faculty Scholarly Works

This Article suggests that people tend to undervalue their procedural rights—their proverbial “day in court”—until they are actually involved in a dispute. The Article argues that the inherent, outcome-independent value of participating in a dispute resolution process comes largely from its power to soothe a person’s grievance— their perception of unfairness and accompanying negative emotional reaction—win or lose. But a tendency to assume unchanging emotional states, known in behavioral economics as projection bias, can prevent people from anticipating that they might become aggrieved and from appreciating the grievance-soothing power of process. When this happens, people will waive their procedural rights …


Procedural Triage, Matthew J.B. Lawrence Oct 2015

Procedural Triage, Matthew J.B. Lawrence

Faculty Scholarly Works

Prior scholarship has assumed that the inherent value of a “day in court” is the same for all claimants, so that when procedural resources (like a jury trial or a hearing) are scarce, they should be rationed the same way for all claimants. That is incorrect. This Article shows that the inherent value of a “day in court” can be far greater for some claimants, such as first-time filers, than for others, such as corporate entities and that it can be both desirable and feasible to take this variation into account in doling out scarce procedural protections. In other words, …


Igniting The Conversation: Embracing Legal Literacy As The Heart Of The Profession, Laura J. Ax-Fultz Oct 2015

Igniting The Conversation: Embracing Legal Literacy As The Heart Of The Profession, Laura J. Ax-Fultz

Faculty Scholarly Works

Law librarians are experts in instruction, databases, scholarship, and more. This broad expertise has exacerbated an identity crisis in the profession. The author argues that law librarians must develop a core identity, such as legal literacy, to navigate an ever-changing legal landscape that questions the future necessity of law librarians.


Transnational Legal Practice, Laurel Terry, Carole Silver Apr 2015

Transnational Legal Practice, Laurel Terry, Carole Silver

Faculty Scholarly Works

This 2015 Year-in-Review article continues the tradition of collecting and publicizing the developments that occurred during the year related to transnational legal practice (TLP). This year’s article builds on the work set forth in the 2014 Year-in-Review.

The 2014 TLP Year-in-Review provided a departure from the Year-in-Review’s typical method of presentation by identifying two categories of what that article called “TLP-Nets.” One group of TLP-Nets is nationally based and the other is inherently transnational. The 2014 article identified examples of TLP-Nets and highlighted the meeting points and relationships that facilitate border-crossing for the variety of actors involved in TLP policy-making …


Creating A Legal Research Audit: Assessing Competency, Gail Partin, Sally Wise Feb 2015

Creating A Legal Research Audit: Assessing Competency, Gail Partin, Sally Wise

Faculty Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


The Promises And Pitfalls Of State Eyewitness Identification Reforms, Nicholas A. Kahn-Fogel Jan 2015

The Promises And Pitfalls Of State Eyewitness Identification Reforms, Nicholas A. Kahn-Fogel

Faculty Scholarly Works

This article provides a comprehensive analysis of state-based eyewitness identification reforms, including legislative directives, evidentiary rules, and judicial interpretations of state constitutions as providing greater protection against the use of unreliable eyewitness evidence than the United State Supreme Court offered in its 1977 decision in Manson v. Brathwaite. While previous scholarship has included thorough consideration of a single state's eyewitness law, state-by-state analysis of a sub-issue in eyewitness law, and brief general surveys of state approaches to eyewitness reform, this article adds to the current body of scholarship with an in-depth evaluation of eyewitness identification law in states that have …


Living With Monsanto, 2015 Mich. St. L. Rev. 559 (2015), Daryl Lim Jan 2015

Living With Monsanto, 2015 Mich. St. L. Rev. 559 (2015), Daryl Lim

Faculty Scholarly Works

Bowman v. Monsanto Co. signaled the end of an era of seed saving. Farmers must buy new seed for replanting or risk patent infringement. The familiar rhetoric of oppressed farmers belies the fact that Monsanto’s success rests in part on farmers prizing its innovations. Current trends indicate that this reliance on Monsanto will continue. The Supreme Court correctly found for Monsanto. However, future cases must iron out the kinks in the Bowman decision. Despite the Court’s best intentions, inadvertence cannot shield farmers from patent infringement. The Court must also make it clear that patentees cannot use licensing restrictions to claw …


Something's Afoot And It's Time To Pay Attention: Thinking About Lawyer Regulation In A New Way, Laurel Terry Jan 2015

Something's Afoot And It's Time To Pay Attention: Thinking About Lawyer Regulation In A New Way, Laurel Terry

Faculty Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Globalization And Regulation, Laurel S. Terry Jan 2015

Globalization And Regulation, Laurel S. Terry

Faculty Contributions to Books

This chapter is part of a 20-chapter book that features essays by subject-matter experts and advances and sharpens the dialogue within the bar about accelerating disruption of the legal services marketplace. It identifies forces that are creating pressure for regulatory change across the United States, summarizes regulatory reforms that have taken place elsewhere in the world, and highlights issues that U.S. lawyer regulators must confront soon in response to a rapidly evolving legal industry. It concludes by offering predictions about the future course of lawyer regulation in the United States. While it is impossible to know exactly which regulatory changes …


Living With Monsanto, Daryl Lim Jan 2015

Living With Monsanto, Daryl Lim

Faculty Scholarly Works

Bowman v. Monsanto Co. signaled the end of an era of seed saving. Farmers must buy new seed for replanting or risk patent infringement. The familiar rhetoric of oppressed farmers belies the fact that Monsanto’s success rests in part on farmers prizing its innovations. Current trends indicate that this reliance on Monsanto will continue. The Supreme Court correctly found for Monsanto. However, future cases must iron out the kinks in the Bowman decision. Despite the Court’s best intentions, inadvertence cannot shield farmers from patent infringement. The Court must also make it clear that patentees cannot use licensing restrictions to claw …