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Environmental law

Pace Environmental Law Review

Natural Resources Law

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Protecting Natural Resources - Forever: The Obligations Of State Officials To Uphold "Forever" Constitutional Provisions, Rachel E. Deming Sep 2019

Protecting Natural Resources - Forever: The Obligations Of State Officials To Uphold "Forever" Constitutional Provisions, Rachel E. Deming

Pace Environmental Law Review

This Article analyzes the attacks on a state constitutional conservation lands program since the election of a governor and state legislature opposed to environmental regulation in 2010 – a precursor to current happenings at the federal level under the Trump administration. Former Florida Governor Rick Scott and his administration have spent an average of over $40 million a year in taxpayer money to defend and, in most cases, pay judgments, in lawsuits challenging mandates of the Florida Constitution.

I examine this issue of ignoring or deliberately violating constitutional requirements through the lens of state constitutional provisions that protect natural resources, …


Municipal Wildfire Management In California: A Local Response To Global Climate Change, Sameer Ponkshe Oct 2015

Municipal Wildfire Management In California: A Local Response To Global Climate Change, Sameer Ponkshe

Pace Environmental Law Review

This Note will examine the wildfire issue in California within the context of municipal government. Part II-A will present a concise look at the current state of affairs regarding climate change, which demonstrates that because little has changed on the international level regarding emissions reductions, the responsibility of protecting people from the catastrophes associated with climate change will fall to lower levels of government. Part II-B will then discuss how wildfire activity is affected by climate change, with specific attention to how the western U.S. has been affected. Part III of this Note focuses on actions of several different municipalities …


How To Avoid Constitutional Challenges To State Based Climate Change Initiatives: A Case Study Of Rocky Mountain Farmers Union V. Corey And New York State Programs, Lauren Baron Oct 2015

How To Avoid Constitutional Challenges To State Based Climate Change Initiatives: A Case Study Of Rocky Mountain Farmers Union V. Corey And New York State Programs, Lauren Baron

Pace Environmental Law Review

Considering the decision in Rocky Mtn. v. Corey and the EPA's actions in accordance with the President's Plan, this comment will outline best practices states can use in creating climate initiatives based on the challenges California faced in Rocky Mtn. v. Corey. Part II of this comment will analyze the reasoning in Rocky Mtn. v. Corey. Although certiorari was denied in the case, Part II will analyze recent Supreme Court dormant Commerce Clause jurisprudence to determine which cases are relevant to consider when analyzing a dormant Commerce Clause challenge to state based climate initiatives. Part III will discuss the current …


Ending The Tyranny Of The Status Quo: Building 21st Century Environmental Law, Scott Schang, Leslie Carothers, Jay Austin Oct 2015

Ending The Tyranny Of The Status Quo: Building 21st Century Environmental Law, Scott Schang, Leslie Carothers, Jay Austin

Pace Environmental Law Review

Over the past few years, the Environmental Law Institute (ELI or the Institute) has worked to assess the notable successes and current challenges of United States environmental law to inform a new agenda for the twenty-first century. Founded in 1969, at the beginning of modern environmental law, the Institute has been both participant and analyst of an impressive record of major accomplishments in pollution reduction, greater protection of public health, and more intelligent conservation and management of natural resources, in both the public and the private sector. Like the majority of environmental lawyers and policy professionals examining today's challenges, we …


Environmental Law's Heartland And Frontiers, Todd S. Aagaard Oct 2015

Environmental Law's Heartland And Frontiers, Todd S. Aagaard

Pace Environmental Law Review

This short paper offers three propositions to help maintain the traditional core of environmental law while also expanding environmental concerns into the frontiers of the field: 1. Environmental law in the heartland and environmental law at the frontiers of the field differ in important ways. 2. The distinctive features of the heartland and frontiers provide important functional benefits for the adaptive development of environmental law in each respective area. 3. Maintaining a distinctive heartland and frontiers of environmental law creates a dialectic relationship between the two that includes tension but also, if properly managed, potential synergies.

The locus of innovation …


The Safe Drinking Water / Food Law Nexus, Margot J. Pollans Oct 2015

The Safe Drinking Water / Food Law Nexus, Margot J. Pollans

Pace Environmental Law Review

At 2 AM on August 2, 2014, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency issued the following warning to the citizens of Toledo: “Do Not Drink.” The Ohio City's tap water was contaminated with microcystin, a toxin that can cause diarrhea, vomiting, and abnormal liver function. The source was an algal bloom in Lake Erie resulting from high levels of agricultural fertilizers and animal waste. For three days, Toledo residents drank only bottled water.

This is just one of many similar examples of agricultural contamination of urban drinking water supplies. Creating a physical connection between urban and rural communities, this pollution highlights …


California Climate Law---Model Or Object Lesson?, Daniel A. Farber Oct 2015

California Climate Law---Model Or Object Lesson?, Daniel A. Farber

Pace Environmental Law Review

In the invitation to this Symposium on Reconceptualizing the Future of Environmental Law, the organizers explained that the Symposium “focuses on the continued expansion of environmental law into distinct areas of the law, requiring an increasingly multidisciplinary approach beyond that of traditional federal regulation.” In short, the question posed is about the future proliferation of environmental measures outside the previous domains of federal environmental statutes.

At the risk of being guilty of local parochialism, I would like to discuss how the future described by the organizers has already arrived in California--both in the sense that a great deal is happening …


Environmental Law In Austerity, James Salzman, J.B. Ruhl, Jonathan Remy Nash Oct 2015

Environmental Law In Austerity, James Salzman, J.B. Ruhl, Jonathan Remy Nash

Pace Environmental Law Review

The EPA has always had enemies. Vigorously denouncing EPA's activities as “overzealous,” “job killing,” or a “regulatory train wreck” has become commonplace on the campaign trail and from special interest groups covered by the agency's reach. Perhaps this is to be expected, since EPA's regulations influence a remarkably wide range of activities throughout the country. The agency, though, has been subject to far more than just harsh rhetoric.

Over the past three decades, there have been concerted efforts in Congress to restrain the EPA both by legislation and, less directly, by reducing its resources. Crippling amendments have largely failed but …


Distributed, Nega-, And Reclaimed: Setting Expectations In The "New" Resource Base, Michael Pappas Oct 2015

Distributed, Nega-, And Reclaimed: Setting Expectations In The "New" Resource Base, Michael Pappas

Pace Environmental Law Review

At this point in time, environmental law faces the task of drawing a budget for living within our resource means, and this budget will be tightly stretched. It must provide energy, water, food, and materials to a growing population; it must cope with the depletion of formerly abundant resources; and it must act both to mitigate climate impacts and adapt to the changes already manifesting. To do this, the budgeting must consider resources and uses that have previously been considered insignificant and that have not received attention in terms of ownership, allocation, or governance. Thus, the future of environmental law …


Engines Of Environmental Innovation: Reflections On The Role Of States In The U.S. Regulatory System, Alexandra Dapolito Dunn, Chandos Culleen Oct 2015

Engines Of Environmental Innovation: Reflections On The Role Of States In The U.S. Regulatory System, Alexandra Dapolito Dunn, Chandos Culleen

Pace Environmental Law Review

This article focuses on the role that states play in environmental regulation. Specifically, this article offers examples of the central part in the evolution of United States environmental regulation states played in the past, continue to play today, and will play in the future. First, this article explores the history of state environmental regulation, demonstrating that despite a lack of resources, states were actively engaged in environmental regulation before the advent of the modern era of federal environmental regulation in the 1970s. This article relates not only the regulatory efforts of states, but also the practical benefits of state regulation. …


Reconceptualizing The Future Of Environmental Law: The Role Of Private Climate Governance, Michael P. Vandenbergh Oct 2015

Reconceptualizing The Future Of Environmental Law: The Role Of Private Climate Governance, Michael P. Vandenbergh

Pace Environmental Law Review

The title of this Symposium, Reconceptualizing the Future of Environmental Law, accurately captures the challenge facing environmental law scholars and policymakers in 2015. The success of environmental law in the future will not arise from doubling down on the approaches developed over the last 50 years. Instead, it will arise from our willingness to learn from the past without being bound by the conceptual frameworks that dominated the early development of the field.

In particular, a successful future for environmental law is more likely to emerge if we acknowledge that the environmental problems, policy plasticity, and regulatory institutions that shaped …


Pace Environmental Law Review 2015 Symposium: Reconceptualizing The Future Of Environmental Law, Cayleigh S. Eckhardt Oct 2015

Pace Environmental Law Review 2015 Symposium: Reconceptualizing The Future Of Environmental Law, Cayleigh S. Eckhardt

Pace Environmental Law Review

Pace Environmental Law Review's 2015 Symposium, entitled Reconceptualizing the Future of Environmental Law, can be traced back to over a year ago when a few Pace Environmental Law faculty members approached me and Katie Hatt, the Managing Editor of the law review, with an idea.1 No, not an idea, rather a question. They simply asked us, “what do you think the future holds for environmental law?” This question transformed into an extensive conversation about the past, the present, and the future of environmental law.