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Pace University

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Labor and Employment Law

NLRA

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Ufc Fighters Are Taking A Beating Because They Are Misclassified As Independent Contractors. An Employee Classification Would Change The Fight Game For The Ufc, Its Fighters, And Mma, Vincent Salminen Jun 2017

Ufc Fighters Are Taking A Beating Because They Are Misclassified As Independent Contractors. An Employee Classification Would Change The Fight Game For The Ufc, Its Fighters, And Mma, Vincent Salminen

Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum

The current state of affairs in the sport of mixed martial arts (MMA) is overwhelmingly in favor of the companies promoting the fights and not in favor of the athletes actually putting their health and lives at risk. This article looks at the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) and how it classifies its fighters as independent contractors rather than employees, even though it treats the fighters more like employees. This article addresses issues fighters are having with the current classification and then examines how the fighters could be classified as employees. Finally, the article will address what an employee classification would …


I’M The One Making The Money, Now Where’S My Cut? Revisiting The Student-Athlete As An “Employee” Under The National Labor Relations Act, John J. Leppler Mar 2014

I’M The One Making The Money, Now Where’S My Cut? Revisiting The Student-Athlete As An “Employee” Under The National Labor Relations Act, John J. Leppler

Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum

This Article argues why the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s (NCAA) Big-Time Division I College Football and Men’s Basketball student-athletes are legally “employees” and why these student-athletes are inadequately compensated for their revenue-producing skills.

Part II of this Article sets forth the common law “right of control” test and the National Labor Relation Act’s (NLRA) special statutory test for students in a university setting, and shows how the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) and the judiciary determine whether a particular person, specifically a university student, meets these standards and is legally an “employee”. Moreover, the NCAA asserts it does not have …