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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Law

Rulemaking In 140 Characters Or Less: Social Networking And Public Participation In Rulemaking, Cynthia R. Farina, Paul Miller, Mary J. Newhart, Claire Cardie, Dan Cosley, Rebecca Vernon Mar 2011

Rulemaking In 140 Characters Or Less: Social Networking And Public Participation In Rulemaking, Cynthia R. Farina, Paul Miller, Mary J. Newhart, Claire Cardie, Dan Cosley, Rebecca Vernon

Pace Law Review

No abstract provided.


Social Media And The Vanishing Points Of Ethical And Constitutional Boundaries, Ken Strutin Mar 2011

Social Media And The Vanishing Points Of Ethical And Constitutional Boundaries, Ken Strutin

Pace Law Review

No abstract provided.


Your Mayor, Your “Friend”: Public Officials, Social Networking, And The Unmapped New Public Square, Bill Sherman Mar 2011

Your Mayor, Your “Friend”: Public Officials, Social Networking, And The Unmapped New Public Square, Bill Sherman

Pace Law Review

No abstract provided.


Perspective On Economic Critiques Of Disability Law: The Multifaceted Federal Role In Balancing Equity And Efficiency, Elizabeth Burleson Jan 2011

Perspective On Economic Critiques Of Disability Law: The Multifaceted Federal Role In Balancing Equity And Efficiency, Elizabeth Burleson

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

Given the recent enactment of the ADA Amendments Act, this article analyzes a Rawlsian philosophical framework with which to view society's treatment of people with disabilities. Allocation of resources remains a pervasive concern of economists and attorneys alike. Need, merit, and market compete as means by which to decide who should receive what benefits. This article concludes that while economics can play a powerful role in the initial allocation of limited resources, there remains a multifaceted federal role to confront discrimination and promote equity.


Punishing Without Free Will, Luis E. Chiesa Jan 2011

Punishing Without Free Will, Luis E. Chiesa

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

This Article will argue that there are good moral reasons to conclude that the scientific plausibility of determinism ought to lead us to abandon the notion of free will. Contra P. F. Strawson and Moore, this Article suggests that rejecting free will does not undermine the human experience, and doing so is plausible and attractive because it would likely lead to more humane and efficient institutions of blaming and punishing.


Legal Realism, Innate Morality, And The Structural Role Of The Supreme Court In The U.S. Constitutional Democracy, Karl S. Coplan Jan 2011

Legal Realism, Innate Morality, And The Structural Role Of The Supreme Court In The U.S. Constitutional Democracy, Karl S. Coplan

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

The classical rationale for judicial review of the constitutionality of legislative and executive acts is based on a deterministic assumption about the nature of constitutional legal rules. By the early twentieth century however; American legal realists persuasively questioned the determinancy of law in general and posited that indeterminate cases were decided by judicial intuitions of fairness. Social science research has discovered that self-identified liberals and conservatives predictably place different relative values on different shared moral intuitions. At the same time, neurological research suggests that humans and primates implement "decisions" before the cognitive parts of the brain are even aware that …


Capturing Individual Harms, Katrina Fischer Kuh Jan 2011

Capturing Individual Harms, Katrina Fischer Kuh

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

The aggregated lifestyles and behaviors of individuals impose significant environmental harms yet remain largely unregulated. A growing literature recognizes the environmental significance of individual behaviors, critiques the failure of environmental law and policy to capture harms traceable to individual behaviors, and suggests and evaluates strategies for capturing individual harms going forward. This Article contributes to the existing literature by approaching the problem of environmentally significant individual harms through the lens of environmental federalism. Using climate change and individual greenhouse gas (“GHG”) emissions as an exemplar, the Article illustrates how local information, local governments, and local implementation can enhance policies designed …