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Marquette University Law School

2019

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Articles 1 - 30 of 74

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Exculpatory Contract And Public Policy, Ralph C. Anzivino Mar 2019

The Exculpatory Contract And Public Policy, Ralph C. Anzivino

Marquette Law Review

Across the country, lawyers have searched for the magic formula to draft an exculpatory contract that would successfully exculpate their client in the event someone was injured while participating in a recreational activity sponsored by the client. Some examples of events would include snow skiing, swimming at a guest-only pool, horseback riding, white-water rafting, camping, running in a marathon, visiting a haunted house at Halloween, or a myriad of other events. The uniform standard by which the enforceability of these exculpatory clauses is measured is whether the exculpatory contract is against public policy.

The public policy of any state can …


The Past And The Present: Stare Decisis In Wisconsin Law, Daniel R. Suhr, Kevin Leroy Mar 2019

The Past And The Present: Stare Decisis In Wisconsin Law, Daniel R. Suhr, Kevin Leroy

Marquette Law Review

None


Title Ix And Title Vii: Parallel Remedies In Combatting Sex Discrimination In Educational Employment, Lynn Ridgeway Zehrt Mar 2019

Title Ix And Title Vii: Parallel Remedies In Combatting Sex Discrimination In Educational Employment, Lynn Ridgeway Zehrt

Marquette Law Review

The federal circuit courts of appeals are divided over the proper relationship between Title IX of the Higher Education Amendments Act of 1972 and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Specifically, the federal courts disagree over whether an employee of an educational institution may sue her employer for employment discrimination under either Title IX or Title VII. Some courts have concluded that these employees may not bring employment discrimination claims under Title IX, holding that Title VII provides the sole avenue for obtaining monetary relief for employment discrimination against educational institutions. Other courts have reached the opposite …


The Interrogations Of Brendan Dassey, Brian Gallini Mar 2019

The Interrogations Of Brendan Dassey, Brian Gallini

Marquette Law Review

On March 1, 2006, a pair of detectives interrogated sixteen-year-old Brendan Dassey—one of two defendants prominently featured in the 2015 Netflix series Making a Murderer—for several hours about his role in the October 31, 2005, disappearance of photographer Teresa Halbach. The prosecution introduced statements obtained during that interrogation at Dassey’s trial. With no corroborating physical evidence, those statements—including that Dassey cut Halbach’s throat—played a significant role in his conviction for Halbach’s murder.

Following his conviction, Dassey’s appellate arguments about the legitimacy of his confession focused on his March 1, 2006, confession. Most recently, his petition for a writ of certiorari …


When Does Big Law Work?, Abraham J.B. Cable Mar 2019

When Does Big Law Work?, Abraham J.B. Cable

Marquette Law Review

Law firms have grown from hundreds of lawyers to thousands of lawyers, and the conventional wisdom is that this trend fuels dissatisfaction among lawyers. This Article scrutinizes that conventional wisdom based on interviews with lawyers who joined large firms through law-firm mergers. These lawyers offer a valuable perspective on firm size because they made abrupt changes from small to large firms. Though some interviewees echoed the conventional wisdom, others suggested that larger firm size has limited or even positive effects on professional satisfaction. In one counter-narrative, large law firms are relatively diffuse organizations that have limited influence over individual lawyers. …


Why Are Seemingly Satisfied Female Lawyers Running For The Exits? Resolving The Paradox Using National Data, Joni Hersch, Erin E. Meyers Mar 2019

Why Are Seemingly Satisfied Female Lawyers Running For The Exits? Resolving The Paradox Using National Data, Joni Hersch, Erin E. Meyers

Marquette Law Review

Despite the fact that women are leaving the practice of law at alarmingly high rates, most previous research finds no evidence of gender differences in job satisfaction among lawyers. This Article uses nationally representative data from the 2015 National Survey of College Graduates to examine gender differences in lawyers’ job satisfaction, and finds that any apparent similarity of job satisfaction between genders likely arises from dissatisfied female JDs sorting out of the legal profession at higher rates than their male counterparts, leaving behind the most satisfied women. This Article also provides a detailed examination of the specific working conditions that …


The Living Constitution And Moral Progress: A Comment On Professor Young's Boden Lecture, David A. Strauss Mar 2019

The Living Constitution And Moral Progress: A Comment On Professor Young's Boden Lecture, David A. Strauss

Marquette Law Review

None


Dying Constitutionalism And The Fourteenth Amendment, Ernest A. Young Mar 2019

Dying Constitutionalism And The Fourteenth Amendment, Ernest A. Young

Marquette Law Review

None


Ad Hoc Diplomats, Ryan M. Scoville Jan 2019

Ad Hoc Diplomats, Ryan M. Scoville

Faculty Publications

Article II of the Constitution grants the president power to appoint “Ambassadors” and “other public Ministers” with the advice and consent of the Senate. By all accounts, this language requires Senate confirmation for the appointment of resident ambassadors and other diplomats of similar rank and tenure. Yet these are hardly the only agents of U.S. foreign relations. Ad hoc diplomats—individuals chosen exclusively by the president to complete limited and temporary assignments—play a comparably significant role in addressing international crises, negotiating treaties, and otherwise executing foreign policy.

This Article critically examines the appointments process for such irregular agents. An orthodox view …


Third-Class Citizenship: The Escalating Legal Consequences Of Committing A “Violent” Crime, Michael M. O'Hear Jan 2019

Third-Class Citizenship: The Escalating Legal Consequences Of Committing A “Violent” Crime, Michael M. O'Hear

Faculty Publications

For many years, American legislatures have been steadily attaching a wide range of legal consequences to convictions — and sometimes even just charges — for crimes that are classified as “violent.” These consequences affect many key aspects of the criminal process, including pretrial detention, eligibility for pretrial diversion, sentencing, eligibility for parole and other opportunities for release from incarceration, and the length and intensity of supervision in the community. The consequences can also affect a person’s legal status and rights long after the sentence for the underlying offense has been served. A conviction for a violent crime can result in …


Who Studies International Law? Explaining Cross-National Variation In Compulsory International Legal Education, Ryan M. Scoville, Mark Berlin Jan 2019

Who Studies International Law? Explaining Cross-National Variation In Compulsory International Legal Education, Ryan M. Scoville, Mark Berlin

Faculty Publications

The compulsory study of international law is a universal component of legal education in some states but extremely uncommon or non-existent in others. This article uses global data and statistical methods to test a number of conceivable explanations for this puzzling feature of international society. In contrast to much of the empirical literature on state behaviour in relation to international law, we find that functionalist and socio-political variables carry little explanatory power and that historical variables – specifically, legal tradition and regional geography – instead account for the overwhelming majority of the global pattern. We explore potential explanations for these …


Assumption Of Flood Risk, Alexander Lemann Jan 2019

Assumption Of Flood Risk, Alexander Lemann

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Autonomous Vehicles, Technological Progress, And The Scope Problem In Products Liability, Alexander Lemann Jan 2019

Autonomous Vehicles, Technological Progress, And The Scope Problem In Products Liability, Alexander Lemann

Faculty Publications

Autonomous vehicles are widely expected to save tens of thousands of lives each year by making car crashes attributable to human error – currently the overwhelming majority of fatal crashes – a thing of the past. How the legal system should attribute responsibility for the (hopefully few) crashes autonomous vehicles cause is an open and hotly debated question.

Most tort scholars approach this question by asking what liability rule is most likely to achieve the desired policy outcome: promoting the adoption of this lifesaving technology without destroying manufacturers’ incentives to optimize it. This approach has led to a wide range …


A Mathematical Solution To The Sine Of Madness That Is Pharmaceutical Compulsory Licensing Under The Trips Agreement And The Doha Declaration, Ashley E. Sperbeck Jan 2019

A Mathematical Solution To The Sine Of Madness That Is Pharmaceutical Compulsory Licensing Under The Trips Agreement And The Doha Declaration, Ashley E. Sperbeck

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

A viable economic solution is necessary to address the shortcomings, textual ambiguities, and deficiencies engulfing international patent protection, leading to the inability of LDCs facing public health crises or national emergencies and lacking pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities to obtain generic pharmaceuticals. This Note poses a solution to this problem via another Amendment to the TRIPS Agreement and the Doha Declaration, which provides a mathematical framework to determine when and under what circumstances a compulsory license should be granted. Furthermore, this Note contemplates establishment of a WTO subcommittee to oversee this proposed solution and to ensure compliance with this Amendment. This concrete …


Med-Arb And Professional Sports: Could Med-Arb Work As An Effective Dispute Resolution Process In Professional Sports?, Taylor Brisco Jan 2019

Med-Arb And Professional Sports: Could Med-Arb Work As An Effective Dispute Resolution Process In Professional Sports?, Taylor Brisco

Marquette Sports Law Review

None


Index: Sports Law In Law Reviews And Journals, Jordan Lysiak Jan 2019

Index: Sports Law In Law Reviews And Journals, Jordan Lysiak

Marquette Sports Law Review

None


Application Of The Uaaa, Ruaaa, And State Athlete-Agent Laws To Corruption In Men's College Basketball And Revisions Necessitated By Ncaa Rule Changes, Joshua Lens Jan 2019

Application Of The Uaaa, Ruaaa, And State Athlete-Agent Laws To Corruption In Men's College Basketball And Revisions Necessitated By Ncaa Rule Changes, Joshua Lens

Marquette Sports Law Review

None


Opting Into Device Regulation In The Face Of Uncertain Patentability, Rebecca S. Eisenberg Jan 2019

Opting Into Device Regulation In The Face Of Uncertain Patentability, Rebecca S. Eisenberg

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

This article examines the intersection of patent law, FDA regulation, and Medicare coverage in a particularly promising field of biomedical innovation: genetic diagnostic testing. First, I will discuss current clinical uses of genetic testing and directions for further research, with a focus on cancer, the field in which genetic testing has had the greatest impact to date. Second, I will turn to patent law and address two recent Supreme Court decisions that called into question the patentability of many of the most important advances in genetic testing. Third, I will step outside patent law to take a broader view of …


Tribal Sovereign Immunity As A Defense At The Patent Trial And Appeal Board? Or A Violation Of U.S. Antitrust Laws?, Samantha Roth Jan 2019

Tribal Sovereign Immunity As A Defense At The Patent Trial And Appeal Board? Or A Violation Of U.S. Antitrust Laws?, Samantha Roth

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

This Comment will address two primary issues. First, it will analyze the basis of sovereign immunity rights of tribes, with a focus on the relationship between intellectual property rights and sovereignty. Second, it will discuss whether this arrangement violates the antitrust laws of the United States. This Comment concludes that even if a claim of tribal sovereign immunity is legitimate, it is likely that such an arrangement still violates the relevant antitrust claims.


The Adr Loophole To Restrictive Non-Compete Agreements, Jad Itani Jan 2019

The Adr Loophole To Restrictive Non-Compete Agreements, Jad Itani

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

This Comment considers a key question: do employers have a strategy to protect themselves if these restrictive states are restricting corporations from protecting their self-developed trade secrets? In doing so, Part II will discuss an approach that may allow employers to potentially circumvent the restrictive states. This can be achieved by requiring an employee to undergo private arbitration in a dispute with an employer—a strategy that has gained validity in light of the United States Supreme Court’s holding that upholds arbitration clauses even where significant public policy concerns exist. Specifically, an employer in a restrictive state could potentially enforce an …


Scènes À Faire In Music: How An Old Defense Is Maturing, And How It Can Be Improved, Torrean Edwards Jan 2019

Scènes À Faire In Music: How An Old Defense Is Maturing, And How It Can Be Improved, Torrean Edwards

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

First, this Comment will provide background on the test for copyright infringement used by the Fourth, Eighth, and Ninth Circuits. Second, the Comment will address what scènes à faire is and how recent cases have treated scènes à faire in music. Third and finally, the Comment will offer a suggestion as to a proper scènes à faire determination and analyze how scènes à faire should be applied.


The Trademark Dilution Revision Act's Nullifying Effect On Famous Mark Holder's Dilution Claims, Kathleen Bodenbach Jan 2019

The Trademark Dilution Revision Act's Nullifying Effect On Famous Mark Holder's Dilution Claims, Kathleen Bodenbach

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

This comment will address how the TDRA has left famous mark holders, particularly high-end fashion house Louis Vuitton, with little in its arsenal to prevent others from mocking and devaluing its marks despite its worthy efforts. Part II addresses the relationship between trademark infringement, dilution, and parody. Part III takes a closer look at fashion giant Louis Vuitton’s strides to protect its famous marks and the courts’ differing approaches to assessing whether a parody exists. Part III also addresses the relationship between parody when it does and does not operate as a designation of source. Part IV offers a discussion …


Property And Equity In Trademark Law, Mark P. Mckenna Jan 2019

Property And Equity In Trademark Law, Mark P. Mckenna

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

This lecture focuses on the relationship between trademark and unfair competition. Specifically, this lecture discusses the way trademark law has evolved over time with respect to property concepts. There has been a lot of discussion in the literature about the ways trademark law has come to treat trademarks as property. Many scholars who have written about this “propertization” have described it as a shift from consumer to producer protection.

I have written a lot about this narrative over the course of my career—I think it is overly simplistic, and in some ways, wrong. Trademark law has al-ways protected marks as …


Finding A Forest Through The Trees: Georgia-Pacific As Guidance For Arbitration Of International Compulsory Licensing Disputes, Karen Mckenzie Jan 2019

Finding A Forest Through The Trees: Georgia-Pacific As Guidance For Arbitration Of International Compulsory Licensing Disputes, Karen Mckenzie

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

This paper will examine the challenges of international compulsory licensing by examining the issue historically and legally as well as offer possible solutions. Thus, this paper will explore the challenge of balancing corporate interests against the affordability and availability of pharmaceuticals by focusing on discrete situations in developing countries, the history of compulsory licensing, and how the World Health Organization (the “WHO”) and the WTO have attempted to tackle these challenges through compulsory licensing, and it will suggest a possible framework for use in arbitration, which balances equities through a Georgia-Pacific analysis.


Can “Imfcoin” Be Scaruffi's Moneta Immaginaria?, Alexander M. Heideman Jan 2019

Can “Imfcoin” Be Scaruffi's Moneta Immaginaria?, Alexander M. Heideman

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

Cryptocurrencies have taken the world by storm. But these decentralized and unregulated digital fiat currencies have more in common with the currencies of ages past than many believe. These commonalities may result in the incorporation of new cryptocurrencies into older institutions. One such institution is the International Monetary Fund's Special Drawing Rights (SDRs), which has bene relegated to an afterthought in the international monetary system since the Nixon Shock in 1971. The Fund's Managing Director recently made comments that indicated that the Fund is exploring the incorporation of a cryptocurrency into the framework of the SDR, a change which China …


Questions Of Trust, Betrayal, And Authorial Control In The Avant-Garde: The Case Of Julius Eastman And John Cage, Toni Lester Jan 2019

Questions Of Trust, Betrayal, And Authorial Control In The Avant-Garde: The Case Of Julius Eastman And John Cage, Toni Lester

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

This article explores how the idea of trust-based dialogue can give us an alternative understanding about the nature of authorial control and inter-pretation across identity-based differences. Part One will discuss the respective personal stories, philosophies, and competing historical understandings that influenced Cage’s creation of Solo and Eastman’s interpretation thereof. Part Two will offer definitions of trust and communication from the fields of feminist relational psychology, philosophy, and law. Throughout Part Two, I will reflect on the extent to which a trust-based dialogue could have taken place between Cage and Eastman. My general sense is that the answer is “no.” Both …


Protecting Wisconsinites From Trolls: The Federal Circuit's "Bad Faith" Preemption And Its Restrictive Effect, Andrew Salomone Jan 2019

Protecting Wisconsinites From Trolls: The Federal Circuit's "Bad Faith" Preemption And Its Restrictive Effect, Andrew Salomone

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

In this comment, I use Wis. Stat. Ann. § 100.197 (“Wisconsin’s anti-PAE statute”) to demonstrate the significant degree to which the Federal Circuit’s current preemption regime restricts states’ abilities to regulate the behavior of PAEs. In Part II, I summarize Wisconsin’s legislative response to PAEs. In Part III, I contrast the Federal Circuit’s preemption doctrine and the Supreme Court’s doctrine as it relates to state laws similar to anti-PAE statutes. Paying particular attention to Wisconsin’s patent notification statute, I provide a brief preemption analysis in Part IV. Finally, in Part V, I conclude by arguing that the severe consequences of …


One Chuck, Two Chuck: Analyzing Whether Federally Registered Trademarks Should Be Distinguished From Unregistered, Common-Law Trademarks In The Context Of Converse, Inc. V. International Trade Commission, Mckenzie Subart Jan 2019

One Chuck, Two Chuck: Analyzing Whether Federally Registered Trademarks Should Be Distinguished From Unregistered, Common-Law Trademarks In The Context Of Converse, Inc. V. International Trade Commission, Mckenzie Subart

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

This Comment analyzes which trademark model (the pyramid model or the box model) is a better representation and characterization of trademarks and trademark rights. Under the pyramid model, there is one trademark: both common law rights and federal registration rights attach to this single trademark. For the pyramid model, trademark rights resemble a pyramid because federal registration rights build upon the foundation created by common law rights. Common law rights and federal registration rights are interdependent. Under the box model, there is a common-law trademark and a federal trademark: common law rights attach to the common-law trademark, and federal registration …


What Are We To Do With Deposit Copies?, Sadie Zurfluh Jan 2019

What Are We To Do With Deposit Copies?, Sadie Zurfluh

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

One of the problems courts are faced with today is determining what happens with unpublished works registered under the 1909 Act: can only the sheet music filed with the deposit copy come into evidence when comparing two works as substantially similar? In 2015, the district court in Williams v. Gaye addressed the issue; however, the Ninth Circuit declined to decide the issue on appeal.8 Later in 2018, in Skidmore v. Zeppelin (“Skidmore”), the Ninth Circuit concluded that when dealing with unpublished works under the 1909 Act, the deposit copy defines the scope of the copyright. Part I of this comment …


Table Of Contents Jan 2019

Table Of Contents

Marquette Sports Law Review

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