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Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

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Why And How Independent Agencies Should Conduct Regulatory Impact Analysis, Jerry Ellig Oct 2018

Why And How Independent Agencies Should Conduct Regulatory Impact Analysis, Jerry Ellig

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

Independent regulatory agencies face increasing pressure to conduct high-quality economic analysis of regulations, similar to the regulatory impact analysis conducted by executive branch agencies. Such analysis could be required by evolving judicial doctrines, regulatory reform statutes, or executive order. This article explains how regulatory impact analysis can contribute to smarter regulation, documents the current low quality of such analysis at many independent regulatory agencies, and offers a blueprint that independent agencies can use to build their capacity to conduct objective, high-quality analysis.


Trans-Cending The Medicalization Of Gender: Improving Legal Protections For People Who Are Transgender And Incarcerated, Lindsey Ruff Oct 2018

Trans-Cending The Medicalization Of Gender: Improving Legal Protections For People Who Are Transgender And Incarcerated, Lindsey Ruff

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

People who are transgender and incarcerated face a unique set of human rights challenges. Courts have made progress protecting transgender people who are incarcerated by relying on the psychiatric diagnosis, Gender Dysphoria (GD), as grounds for legal protections. However, reliance on a medical model of gender has practical limitations and adverse social consequences. This model fails to protect the most vulnerable people of trans experience and contributes to stigma against the transgender community overall. The social and legal interests of people who are transgender and incarcerated would be better served if their rights were protected on alternate legal grounds.

Part …


Vol. 28, No. 1 Table Of Contents Oct 2018

Vol. 28, No. 1 Table Of Contents

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Who Knows What, And When?: A Survey Of The Privacy Policies Proffered By U.S. Direct-To-Consumer Genetic Testing Companies, James W. Hazel, Christopher Slobogin Oct 2018

Who Knows What, And When?: A Survey Of The Privacy Policies Proffered By U.S. Direct-To-Consumer Genetic Testing Companies, James W. Hazel, Christopher Slobogin

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing (DTC-GT) companies have proliferated in the past several years. Based on an analysis of genetic material submitted by consumers, these companies offer a wide array of services, ranging from providing information about health and ancestry to identification of surreptitiously-gathered biological material sent in by suspicious spouses. Federal and state laws are ambiguous about the types of disclosures these companies must make about how the genetic information they obtain is collected, used, and shared. In an effort to assist in developing such laws, this Article reports a survey of the privacy policies these companies purport to follow. It …


Speaking Louder Than Words: Finding An Overt Act Requirement In The Hobbs Act, Matthew Ladew Oct 2018

Speaking Louder Than Words: Finding An Overt Act Requirement In The Hobbs Act, Matthew Ladew

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

Federal conspiracy law has a problem. It is sometimes easier to put someone in prison for twenty years than it is to put her away for five— for the very same crime. This situation stems from a bright-line rule to which the Supreme Court has long adhered: when Congress wants an overt act requirement, Congress will explicitly so specify. Consider the resulting status quo. The general federal conspiracy statute requires proof of an overt act. Its maximum sentence is five years. In contrast, the Hobbs Act contains no overt act requirement, yet it provides for a maximum sentence of twenty …


Do You Tru$T Your Children: A Parent’S Final Dilemma, J. Sam Rodgers Oct 2018

Do You Tru$T Your Children: A Parent’S Final Dilemma, J. Sam Rodgers

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

Incentive trusts developed out of unique American inheritance laws and have become a regarded estate planning tool. Policy, observation, and research suggest that they are inadequate, although still uncritically used. A Hidden Bonus Trust is an improved solution that builds on the shortcomings of incentive trusts. Hidden Bonus Trusts quench parents’ desires to leave legacies and motivate troubled beneficiaries.


The Ethical Challenges Of The Marketplace, Eduardo M. Peñalver Apr 2018

The Ethical Challenges Of The Marketplace, Eduardo M. Peñalver

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Regulating Markets For Gestational Care: Comparative Perspectives On Surrogacy In The United States And India, Sital Kalantry Apr 2018

Regulating Markets For Gestational Care: Comparative Perspectives On Surrogacy In The United States And India, Sital Kalantry

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

Many newly emerging surrogacy markets imported the American-style free market model to surrogacy, but this model has led to exploitation and abuse of surrogates even though similar abuses were not observed in the United States. It is interesting that even in U.S. states where there is no legislation that directly regulates surrogacy, industry actors have developed customary terms and norms that provide a basic level of rights and protections to surrogates. However, industry norms do not similarly protect surrogates in India.

I argue that industry actors in the United States are incentivized to create such protective norms because they have …


Markets For Self-Authorship, Hanoch Dagan Apr 2018

Markets For Self-Authorship, Hanoch Dagan

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

Markets are complex phenomena with heterogeneous manifestations. They involve different types of goods and services and can be structured around different property and contract types. This plurality of markets justifies a careful attitude towards the definition of a market. It also counsels some suspicion towards overly-broad normative judgments, be they celebratory or critical, launched at markets-as-such.

But markets are powerful institutions that significantly impact individuals, affect relationships, and shape societies. They should thus be subject to critical scrutiny vis-A-vis the various goals that justify the complex legal arrangements which sustain them. Promoting social welfare, rewarding desert, inculcating virtues, and spreading …


Drunk Driving, Blood, And Breath: The Impact Of Birchfield V. North Dakota, Simon Bord Apr 2018

Drunk Driving, Blood, And Breath: The Impact Of Birchfield V. North Dakota, Simon Bord

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

Birchfield v. North Dakota is a landmark decision that will influence criminal procedure jurisprudence for years to come. Birchfield drew a distinction between the level of intrusiveness inherent in a breath test versus a blood test, upholding warrantless searches incident to a DUI arrest involving the former, but not the latter. In addition, the Court ruled that criminal penalties for refusing to consent to a blood draw were unconstitutional, but such penalties were an acceptable punishment for motorists who refused to undergo a breath test. Because Birchfield failed to establish a clear rule regarding the permissible scope of implied consent …


Just Prices, Robert C. Hockett, Roy Kreitner Apr 2018

Just Prices, Robert C. Hockett, Roy Kreitner

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

In what sense do market prices represent or convey value? At first glance, such prices might look like the upshot of spontaneous social aggregation without exogenously imposed order: uncoordinated individual trading decisions yield "price information" that is said both to induce socially efficient productive decisions and to set a framework that facilitates coherent and welfare-enhancing consumer choice. But while some trading decisions might well be uncoordinated,far from all of them are; and the rules within which trade is conducted are in any event the product of social choice. When we recognize that these rules of trade and certain public practices …


Against Market Insularity: Market, Responsibility, And Law, Avihay Dorfman Apr 2018

Against Market Insularity: Market, Responsibility, And Law, Avihay Dorfman

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

In this Article, I take stock of some leading attempts to drive a wedge between distinctively market reasoning and practical (including moral) reasoning. Although these attempts focus on different normative foundations-the epistemology of market interaction, the autonomy of its participants, the stability-enhancing quality of markets, and the authority of democratic decision-making-they are of a piece insofar as they seek to trivialize the role of private responsibility for realizing the demands of morality and justice. Essentially, they seek to insulate, at least to an important extent, the market practice of doing well from the demands of doing right. I argue that …


Of Buildings, Statues, Art, And Sperm: The Right To Destroy And The Duty To Preserve, Gregory S. Alexander Apr 2018

Of Buildings, Statues, Art, And Sperm: The Right To Destroy And The Duty To Preserve, Gregory S. Alexander

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

Courts tend to frame right-to-destroy disputes in terms of a conflict between respecting individual autonomy and avoiding social waste. That framing unduly obscures what is involved in these cases. Autonomy is a rich value that requires discerned investigation, and social waste masks the existence of community capabilities of legitimate concern. A human flourishing perspective illuminates these multiple values and capabilities. Conflicts involving the right to destroy resist neat categorical solutions, but that does not mean that they cannot be resolved rationally or even with a relatively high degree of predictability, as I have tried to show in this Article.


Questioning Market Aversion In Gender Equality Strategies: Designing Legal Mechanisms For The Promotion Of Gender Equality In The Family And The Market, Hila Shamir, Tsilly Dagan, Ayelet Carmeli Apr 2018

Questioning Market Aversion In Gender Equality Strategies: Designing Legal Mechanisms For The Promotion Of Gender Equality In The Family And The Market, Hila Shamir, Tsilly Dagan, Ayelet Carmeli

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

This Article suggests that tax and welfare policies that promote gender equality require creative thinking about the design of social mechanisms for the promotion of women. It offers a framework for expanding the institutional imagination in order to recalibrate welfare state reforms to promote women. In particular, we advocate the creative use of legal tools and doctrine to dismantle existing dichotomies between private and public, understand the various goals different mechanisms can serve and reassemble them to promote different mixes of normative goals. We propose doing so by looking simultaneously at two fields of redistribution: welfare state benefits and services …


Families And The Ethic Of Globordered Markets, Daphna Hacker Apr 2018

Families And The Ethic Of Globordered Markets, Daphna Hacker

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

In this Article, I examine the ethical implications of the impact of what I term globordered markets-that is, the markets created by the intense interactions between national borders and globalization-on families. While the interrelations between "the family" and "the market" have been acknowledged ever since Engels pointed to the connection between private property and the patriarchal family, and more recently in the rich discussions over work-family balance, there remains much more to be explored in this moral domain. In particular, very little scholarly attention has been given to how families are affected by both the global market and the impact …


Ethical Finance As A Systemic Challenge: Risk, Culture, And Structure, Saule T. Omarova Apr 2018

Ethical Finance As A Systemic Challenge: Risk, Culture, And Structure, Saule T. Omarova

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

This Article analyzes the principal themes in the newly reinvigorated public debate on the role of ethical norms and cultural factors in financial markets and identifies its key conceptual and normative limitations. It argues that the principal flaw in that debate is that it tends to ignore the critical role of systemic, structural factors in shaping individual firms' internal cultural norms and attitudes toward legitimate business conduct. Reversing the causality assumption underlying the current academic and policy discourse on institutional culture, the Article discusses how broader reform measures seeking to alter the fundamental structure and dynamics of the financial market-on …


The Rationality Of Promising, Emily Sherwin Apr 2018

The Rationality Of Promising, Emily Sherwin

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

Binding promises yield a number of practical benefits, if in fact they are binding. One benefit is coordination. Knowing that she must perform, the promisor can allocate her time and resources more effectively. The promisee, meanwhile, can make plans on the assumption that the promised act will occur.

Markets for future exchange rely on the coordinating power of binding promises. For this purpose, it may be possible in theory to support coordination by designing and enforcing an ideal set of legal rules governing contractual obligation. Almost certainly, however, markets will function more effectively if promises also impose obligations to perform …


Under-Propertied Persons, Marc L. Roark Oct 2017

Under-Propertied Persons, Marc L. Roark

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

Property shapes the way we talk about our communities and ourselves. It also, unintentionally, shapes the way we talk about the poor. Within property, the doctrine of waste reinforces notions of autonomy, privacy, and boundary-making for property owners, while leaving those without property searching for other ways to assert these self-defining protections. Likewise, nuisance assists owners' participation in their communities by dictating when individuals must account for harms their property use causes to neighbors. The law, however, provides few legal remedies for poor persons who are harmed by owners' sanctioned use of property. Through the language of ownership, property doctrines …


Trial By Numbers, Rebecca K. Helm, Valerie P. Hans, Valerie F. Reyna Oct 2017

Trial By Numbers, Rebecca K. Helm, Valerie P. Hans, Valerie F. Reyna

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

Legal cases often require jurors to use numerical information. They may need to evaluate the meaning of specific numbers, such as the probability of match between a suspect and a DNA sample, or they may need to arrive at a sound numerical judgment, such as a money damage award. Thus, it is important to know how jurors understand numerical information, and what steps can be taken to increase juror comprehension and appropriate application of numerical evidence. In this Article, we examine two types of juror decisions involving numbers--decisions in which jurors must convert numbers into meaning (such as by understanding …


Redefining "Medical Care", Lauren R. Roth Oct 2017

Redefining "Medical Care", Lauren R. Roth

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

President Donald J. Trump has said he will repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and replace it with health savings accounts (HSAs). Conservatives have long preferred individual accounts to meet social welfare needs instead of more traditional entitlement programs. The types of "medical care" that can be reimbursed through an HSA are listed in § 213(d) of the Internal Revenue Code (Code) and include expenses "for the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease, or for the purpose of affecting any structure or function of the body."

In spite of the broad language, regulations and court interpretations have narrowed …


Cross-Examination, College Sexual-Assault Adjudications, And The Opportunity For Tuning Up The "Greatest Legal Engine Ever Invented", H. Hunter Bruton Oct 2017

Cross-Examination, College Sexual-Assault Adjudications, And The Opportunity For Tuning Up The "Greatest Legal Engine Ever Invented", H. Hunter Bruton

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

With its reputation as the "greatest legal engine ever invented" cross-examination rarely receives critical evaluation. This Article seeks to narrow that academic gap and offer pragmatic advice to policymakers and judges considering the in-the-trenches issues of cross-examination. Despite a great body of empirical and interdisciplinary work on cross-examination, legal scholarship often relegates discussion of cross-examination's benefits and costs to an errant footnote or a short paragraph. But cross-examination's efficacy should not be an afterthought or aside to doctrinal exegesis. Answers to the hardest questions about the presence, scope, and format of cross-examination rely on assumptions about the benefits and costs …


Explaining The Absence Of Surgical Procedure Regulation, Jonathan J. Darrow Oct 2017

Explaining The Absence Of Surgical Procedure Regulation, Jonathan J. Darrow

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

Systematic evaluation of both existing and innovative surgical procedures is needed to make important safety and efficacy data available to surgeons, facilitating optimal treatment decisions. High quality risk-benefit data is also essential if the healthcare system is to honor its obligation to inform patients of relevant benefits and risks prior to obtaining their consent to treatment.

Yet for a variety of reasons, surgical procedures are not subject to direct regulation. As a result, surgeons consulting the available literature may find it inadequate to answer fundamental questions about optimal treatment choices. This failure of information increases the chance that, for years …


Three Cheers For Trekonomics: The Future Of Copyright Doctrine According To Star Athletica And Star Trek, Philip M. Duclos Oct 2017

Three Cheers For Trekonomics: The Future Of Copyright Doctrine According To Star Athletica And Star Trek, Philip M. Duclos

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Objects Of Art; Objects Of Property, Gregory S. Alexander Apr 2017

Objects Of Art; Objects Of Property, Gregory S. Alexander

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Law In The Work Of Felix Gonzales-Torres, Eduardo M. Peñalver, Sergio Muñoz Sarmiento Apr 2017

Law In The Work Of Felix Gonzales-Torres, Eduardo M. Peñalver, Sergio Muñoz Sarmiento

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Public Experience/Private Authority, Martha Buskirk Apr 2017

Public Experience/Private Authority, Martha Buskirk

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Carlos And Rosa De La Cruz Introductory Remarks, Rosa R. De La Cruz Apr 2017

Carlos And Rosa De La Cruz Introductory Remarks, Rosa R. De La Cruz

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


The Public Good In Poetic Justice, Sonya K. Katyal Apr 2017

The Public Good In Poetic Justice, Sonya K. Katyal

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Felix Gonzalez-Torres's Epistemic Art, Robert Hobbs Apr 2017

Felix Gonzalez-Torres's Epistemic Art, Robert Hobbs

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Felix Gonzales-Torres On Contracts, Joan Kee Apr 2017

Felix Gonzales-Torres On Contracts, Joan Kee

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.