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Full-Text Articles in Law

James Kapembwa V The People Appeal No. 53/2022 (23 February 2023), Mwami Kabwabwa May 2023

James Kapembwa V The People Appeal No. 53/2022 (23 February 2023), Mwami Kabwabwa

SAIPAR Case Review

The appellant James Kapembwa was charged with defilement contrary to section 138 of the Penal Code Act chapter 87 of the Laws of Zambia. He was convicted of the offence and sentenced to 15 years imprisonment with hard labour by the High Court of Zambia. Unsatisfied with the decision of the High Court, the appellant appealed to the Court of Appeal against his conviction and sentence.

On 23rd February 2023, The Court of Appeal handed down its judgment in respect of the aforesaid application for leave to appeal against sentencing and conviction. It held that the appellant had known the …


Law, Lawyers And Sustainable Development: Reflections Of A Fellow Traveler, Muna B. Ndulo Jun 2021

Law, Lawyers And Sustainable Development: Reflections Of A Fellow Traveler, Muna B. Ndulo

Southern African Journal of Policy and Development

At the national level, the rule of law is necessary to create an environment for providing sustainable livelihoods and eradicating poverty. Poverty often stems from disempowerment, exclusion and discrimination. The rule of law fosters development through strengthening the voices of individuals and communities, by providing access to justice, ensuring due process and establishing remedies for the violation of rights. Security of livelihoods, shelter, tenure and contracts can enable and empower the poor to defend themselves against violations of their rights. Legal empowerment goes beyond the provision of legal remedies and supports better economic opportunities. In order for the rule of …


Savenda Management Services Limited V Stanbic Bank Zambia Limited & Gregory Chifire (Alleged Contemnor) (Appeal No. 37/2017) [2018] Zmsc 11, Mwami Kabwabwa Nov 2020

Savenda Management Services Limited V Stanbic Bank Zambia Limited & Gregory Chifire (Alleged Contemnor) (Appeal No. 37/2017) [2018] Zmsc 11, Mwami Kabwabwa

SAIPAR Case Review

Adjudicators have a social responsibility. When the Judiciary/judges carry out their constitutional mandate of dispensing justice it is critical to bear in mind that judges carry a level of responsibility for the impact that their decisions have on society. For this reason, judges ought to be held responsible for every judgment they render either good or bad. Contempt is an exceedingly powerful instrument in the hands of the courts to tame the conduct and behaviour of lawyers and lay people who come into contact with judicial authority. Like any other power, the exercise of contempt power has to be checked. …


The Multiple Selves Of Economic Self-Determination, Odette Lienau Feb 2020

The Multiple Selves Of Economic Self-Determination, Odette Lienau

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

In this Essay, I argue that the contemporary world requires an explicitly plural and flexible conception of economic self-determination and especially a broader vision of the economic “self” at its center. I contend that older dyadic understandings of economic self-determination, formed largely in light of twentieth-century anticolonial struggles, are no longer sufficient. Individuals can be economically constrained across multiple vectors by newly powerful actors and innovative forms of control. They are thus potentially implicated in multiple political and economic selves—not just personal but also local, national, and transnational.

As such, those seeking to promote economic self-determination should more explicitly recognize …


Property, Dignity, And Human Flourishing, Gregory S. Alexander May 2019

Property, Dignity, And Human Flourishing, Gregory S. Alexander

Cornell Law Review

Human flourishing and human dignity are not empty phrases. They have real content, and they matter in real lives. The facts are that we want to live flourishing lives and we want to live lives of dignity. We cannot live such lives, however, unless certain conditions are fulfilled. Among these conditions, flourishing is personal autonomy, understood in the sense of self-authorship. Autonomy in that sense itself requires certain conditions. Property is among the conditions intimately connected with self-authorship. A person who lacks basic forms of property such as food and adequate shelter is denied self-authorship, without which she cannot experience …


Suicide And Euthanasia: The International Perspective On The Right To Die, Zachary A. Feldman Mar 2019

Suicide And Euthanasia: The International Perspective On The Right To Die, Zachary A. Feldman

Cornell Law Review

Several countries across the globe have weighed their interests in preserving life, in preventing suicide, and in allowing terminally ill patients to end their lives at their own discretion with, or without, the help of a physician. This Note will highlight the inconsistencies in jurisdictions that treat suicidal ideations both criminally and medically, and ultimately argues for a uniform system of laws that govern mental illness internationally.


The Maternal Dilemma, Noya Rimalt May 2018

The Maternal Dilemma, Noya Rimalt

Cornell Law Review

When enacting the FMLA and setting a minimum standard of family leave for all eligible employees, Congress was particularly cautious about attacking the stereotype that all women are responsible for family caregiving. As Justice Rehnquist explained in Nevada v. Hibbs, the goal was to encourage men to assume more caretaking responsibilities at home, thus reducing employers' incentives to discriminate against women by basing hiring and promotion decisions on the stereotype of women as mothers. Indeed, the likely contribution of the gender- neutral parental leave legislation to the promotion of gender equality in the division of care-work at home, hence to …


Regulating Markets For Gestational Care: Comparative Perspectives On Surrogacy In The United States And India, Sital Kalantry Apr 2018

Regulating Markets For Gestational Care: Comparative Perspectives On Surrogacy In The United States And India, Sital Kalantry

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

Many newly emerging surrogacy markets imported the American-style free market model to surrogacy, but this model has led to exploitation and abuse of surrogates even though similar abuses were not observed in the United States. It is interesting that even in U.S. states where there is no legislation that directly regulates surrogacy, industry actors have developed customary terms and norms that provide a basic level of rights and protections to surrogates. However, industry norms do not similarly protect surrogates in India.

I argue that industry actors in the United States are incentivized to create such protective norms because they have …


‘Rule Of Law’ In China: The Confrontation Of Formal Law With Cultural Norms, Larry A. Dimatteo Apr 2018

‘Rule Of Law’ In China: The Confrontation Of Formal Law With Cultural Norms, Larry A. Dimatteo

Cornell International Law Journal

This Article will be one of the first to fully examine the adoption of the first part of China’s long-term quest to enact a grand civil code. It is primarily an examination of the interaction between law and culture— this interaction is most visible when law is transplanted from one legal tradition (Western) into a country of a different legal tradition (Eastern). The General Rules of the Civil Law of the People’s Republic of China took effect on October 1, 2017. This enactment of general principles is the first step in what is expected to take up to five years …


Families And The Ethic Of Globordered Markets, Daphna Hacker Apr 2018

Families And The Ethic Of Globordered Markets, Daphna Hacker

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy

In this Article, I examine the ethical implications of the impact of what I term globordered markets-that is, the markets created by the intense interactions between national borders and globalization-on families. While the interrelations between "the family" and "the market" have been acknowledged ever since Engels pointed to the connection between private property and the patriarchal family, and more recently in the rich discussions over work-family balance, there remains much more to be explored in this moral domain. In particular, very little scholarly attention has been given to how families are affected by both the global market and the impact …


A Pragmatist's View Of Promissory Law With A Focus On Consent And Reliance, Robert A. Hillman Feb 2018

A Pragmatist's View Of Promissory Law With A Focus On Consent And Reliance, Robert A. Hillman

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

This article discusses Professor Nate Oman's excellent new book, "The Dignity of Commerce," which makes an impressive case for how markets can produce "desirable" outcomes for society. In addition to a comprehensive account of what he calls "virtues" of markets, such as their tendency to produce cooperation, trust, and wealth, the book is full of useful and persuasive supporting information and discussions.

Oman is not only a fan of markets, but he asserts that markets are the "center" of contract theory, and provide its normative foundation. Elaborating, Oman concludes that "contract law exists primarily to support markets" and that "contracts …


If It Walks Like Systematic Exclusion And Quacks Like Systematic Exclusion: Follow-Up On Removal Of Women And African-Americans In Jury Selection In South Carolina Capital Cases, 1997-2014, Ann M. Eisenberg, Amelia Courtney Hritz, Caisa Elizabeth Royer, John H. Blume Apr 2017

If It Walks Like Systematic Exclusion And Quacks Like Systematic Exclusion: Follow-Up On Removal Of Women And African-Americans In Jury Selection In South Carolina Capital Cases, 1997-2014, Ann M. Eisenberg, Amelia Courtney Hritz, Caisa Elizabeth Royer, John H. Blume

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

This Article builds on an earlier study analyzing bases and rates of removal of women and African-American jurors in a set of South Carolina capital cases decided between 1997 and 2012. We examine and assess additional data from new perspectives in order to establish a more robust, statistically strengthened response to the original research question: whether, and if so, why, prospective women and African-American jurors were disproportionately removed in different stages of jury selection in a set of South Carolina capital cases.

The study and the article it builds on add to decades of empirical research exploring the impacts (or …


Recovering Socialism For Feminist Legal Theory In The 21 St Century, Cynthia Grant Bowman Nov 2016

Recovering Socialism For Feminist Legal Theory In The 21 St Century, Cynthia Grant Bowman

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

This Article argues that a significant strand of feminist theory in the 1970s and 1980s — socialist feminism — has largely been ignored by feminist jurisprudence in the United States and explores potential contributions to legal theory of recapturing the insights of socialist feminism. It describes both the context out of which that theory grew, in the civil rights, anti-war, and anti-imperialist struggles of the 1960s, and the contents of the theory as developed in the writings of certain authors such as Heidi Hartmann, Zillah Eisenstein, and Iris Young, as well as their predecessors in the U.K., and in the …


Should Children Work? Dilemmas Of Children’S Educational Rights In The Global South, Conrad John Masabo Sep 2016

Should Children Work? Dilemmas Of Children’S Educational Rights In The Global South, Conrad John Masabo

Southern African Journal of Policy and Development

The realisation of Children’s Rights and the right to education, in particular, have for quite long left the children of the Global South at a crossroads. The ideal of a childhood free from work has in itself become a barrier to access this social good. As such, due to their country’s minimal or non-existent educational funding and family abject poverty, some children in the Global South have realised that adopting a pragmatic strategy of combining school and work is the only feasible solution. This study, therefore, examines the interface between children’s work and schooling in the Global South.


"Never Having Loved At All": An Overlooked Interest That Grounds The Abortion Right, Sherry F. Colb Feb 2016

"Never Having Loved At All": An Overlooked Interest That Grounds The Abortion Right, Sherry F. Colb

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Feminist and some other abortion rights advocates typically ground the right to abortion in bodily integrity, thus conceptualizing abortion as vindicating a right to disassociate oneself from an intruder. Although valid as a matter of logic, the bodily integrity argument is libertarian and seemingly selfish. But a fundamentally associative interest also grounds the abortion right. A woman who cannot raise a child but is legally required to bear one must undergo the psychic pain of forced separation from an infant whom she is biologically programmed to love. Human mothers, like other mammalian mothers, grieve the loss of their young, as …


Democratic Deliberation In The Wild: The Mcgill Online Design Studio And The Regulationroom Project, Cynthia R. Farina, Hoi Kong, Cheryl Blake, Mary J. Newhart, Nik Luka Oct 2014

Democratic Deliberation In The Wild: The Mcgill Online Design Studio And The Regulationroom Project, Cynthia R. Farina, Hoi Kong, Cheryl Blake, Mary J. Newhart, Nik Luka

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Although there is no single unified conception of deliberative democracy, the generally accepted core thesis is that democratic legitimacy comes from authentic deliberation on the part of those affected by a collective decision. This deliberation must occur under conditions of equality, broadmindedness, reasonableness, and inclusion. In exercises such as National Issue forums, citizen juries, and consensus conferences, deliberative practitioners have shown that careful attention to process design can enable ordinary citizens to engage in meaningful deliberation about difficult public policy issues. Typically, however, these are closed exercises-that is, they involve a limited number of participants, often selected to achieve a …


Anarchy, Status Updates, And Utopia, James Grimmelmann Oct 2014

Anarchy, Status Updates, And Utopia, James Grimmelmann

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Social software has a power problem. Actually, it has two. The first is technical. Unlike the rule of law, the rule of software is simple and brutal: whoever controls the software makes the rules. And if power corrupts, then automatic power corrupts automatically. Facebook can drop you down the memory hole; Paypal can garnish your pay. These sovereigns of software have absolute and dictatorial control over their domains.

Is it possible to create online spaces without technical power? It is not, because of social software’s second power problem. Behind technical power there is also social power. Whenever people come together …


Changing The Wind: Notes Toward A Demosprudence Of Law And Social Movements, Lani Guinier, Gerald Torres Jun 2014

Changing The Wind: Notes Toward A Demosprudence Of Law And Social Movements, Lani Guinier, Gerald Torres

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

This essay was influenced by a class on Law and Social Movements that Professors Guinier and Torres taught at the Yale Law School in 2011. This essay was also informed by numerous conversations with Bruce Ackerman regarding his book that is under review in this Symposium. While we are in fundamental agreement with Professor Ackerman’s project, as well as the claims he makes as to the new constitutional canon, we supplement his analysis with the overlooked impact of the lawmaking potential of social movements. In particular, we focus on those social movements that were critical to the legal changes that …


Property's Ends: The Publicness Of Private Law Values, Gregory S. Alexander Mar 2014

Property's Ends: The Publicness Of Private Law Values, Gregory S. Alexander

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Property theorists commonly suppose that property has as its ends certain private values, such as individual autonomy and personal security. This Essay contends that property’s real end is human flourishing, that is, living a life that is as fulfilling as possible. Human flourishing, although property’s ultimate end, is neither monistic nor simple. Rather, it is inclusive and comprises multiple values. Those values, the content of human flourishing, derives, at least in part, from an understanding of the sorts of beings we are―social and political. A consequence of this conception of the human condition is that the values that constitute human …


Legal Education In An Era Of Globalisation And The Challenge Of Development, Muna Ndulo Jan 2014

Legal Education In An Era Of Globalisation And The Challenge Of Development, Muna Ndulo

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

The article examines the challenges legal education faces as a result of globalisation with specific reference to African law schools. It considers the challenges and ways of meeting them. The practice of law in a globalised world requires a body of knowledge which is both complex and interdisciplinary. It requires the acquisition of a broad range of new skills and techniques of solving legal problems. To equip lawyers with the needed skills to practise law in a globalised world will require changes in the traditional law school curriculum. It will require a curriculum which trains lawyers for the practice of …


Was Ellen Wronged?, Stephen P. Garvey Jun 2013

Was Ellen Wronged?, Stephen P. Garvey

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Imagine a citizen (call her Ellen) engages in conduct the state says is a crime, for example, money laundering. Imagine too that the state of which Ellen is a citizen has decided to make money laundering a crime. Does the state wrong Ellen when it punishes her for money laundering? It depends on what you think about the authority of the criminal law. Most criminal law scholars would probably say that the criminal law as such has no authority. Whatever authority is has depends on how well it adheres to the demands of morality inasmuch as morality is the only …


Why 'Nonexistent People' Do Not Have Zero Well-Being But No Well-Being At All, Ori J. Herstein Mar 2013

Why 'Nonexistent People' Do Not Have Zero Well-Being But No Well-Being At All, Ori J. Herstein

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Some believe that the harm or benefit of existence is assessed by comparing a person’s actual state of well-being with the level of well-being they would have had had they never existed. This approach relies on ascribing a state or level of well-being to “nonexistent people,” which seems a peculiar practice: how can we attribute well-being to a “nonexistent person”? To explain away this oddity, some have argued that because no properties of well-being can be attributed to “nonexistent people” such people may be ascribed a neutral or zero level of well-being, setting the baseline for comparatively assessing the harm …


Ownership And Obligations: The Human Flourishing Theory Of Property, Gregory S. Alexander Jan 2013

Ownership And Obligations: The Human Flourishing Theory Of Property, Gregory S. Alexander

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Private property ordinarily triggers notions of individual rights, not social obligations. The core image of property rights, in the minds of most people, is that the owner has a right to exclude others and owes no further obligation to them. That image is highly misleading. Property owners owe far more responsibilities to others, both owners and non-owners, than the conventional imagery of property rights suggests. Property rights are inherently relational, and because of this characteristic, owners necessarily owe obligations to others. But the responsibility, or obligation, dimension of private ownership has been sorely under-theorised. Inherent in the concept of ownership …


Jury Jokes And Legal Culture, Valerie P. Hans Jan 2013

Jury Jokes And Legal Culture, Valerie P. Hans

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Spandrel Or Frankenstein's Monster? The Vices And Virtues Of Retrofitting In American Law, Michael C. Dorf Nov 2012

Spandrel Or Frankenstein's Monster? The Vices And Virtues Of Retrofitting In American Law, Michael C. Dorf

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Ancient mythology, literary fiction, and modern science fiction films all recount a similar cautionary tale: human ingenuity gives rise to a powerful invention, but through human fallibility and, in some tellings, venality, the invention becomes a monster and turns on its creators. Perhaps the most famous example is Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, in which Dr. Frankenstein's attempt to fashion a living man from the dead remains of others succeeds, only then to go horribly awry. Such stories are timeless because they warn of the dangers of indelible features of human nature: hubris and short-sightedness. Recent large-scale catastrophes such as the 2010 …


Special Feature: The Future Of Lay Adjudication In Korea And Japan, Hiroshi Fukurai, Valerie P. Hans May 2012

Special Feature: The Future Of Lay Adjudication In Korea And Japan, Hiroshi Fukurai, Valerie P. Hans

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Three years after Korea introduced the jury system for the first time in its history, and two years following the Japanese introduction of a mixed court in which citizen and professional judges decide serious criminal cases, the Second East Asian Law and Society Conference was held on September 30th and October 1st, 2011 in the vibrant city of Seoul, South Korea. This Special Issue of the Yonsei Law Journal offers an opportunity to present work on some of the key issues that were discussed and debated at this remarkable conference. In particular, the special issue offers new research on the …


"They Saw A Protest": Cognitive Illiberalism And The Speech-Conduct Distinction, Dan M. Kahan, David A. Hoffman, Donald Braman, Danieli Evans, Jeffrey J. Rachlinski Apr 2012

"They Saw A Protest": Cognitive Illiberalism And The Speech-Conduct Distinction, Dan M. Kahan, David A. Hoffman, Donald Braman, Danieli Evans, Jeffrey J. Rachlinski

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

“Cultural cognition” refers to the unconscious influence of individuals’ group commitments on their perceptions of legally consequential facts. We conducted an experiment to assess the impact of cultural cognition on perceptions of facts relevant to distinguishing constitutionally protected “speech” from unprotected “conduct.” Study subjects viewed a video of a political demonstration. Half the subjects believed that the demonstrators were protesting abortion outside of an abortion clinic, and the other half that the demonstrators were protesting the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy outside a campus recruitment facility. Subjects of opposing cultural outlooks who were assigned to the same experimental condition …


From Multiculturalism To Technique: Feminism, Culture, And The Conflict Of Laws Style, Karen Knop, Ralf Michaels, Annelise Riles Mar 2012

From Multiculturalism To Technique: Feminism, Culture, And The Conflict Of Laws Style, Karen Knop, Ralf Michaels, Annelise Riles

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

The German Chancellor, the French President, and the British Prime Minister have each grabbed world headlines with pronouncements that their states' policies of multiculturalism have failed. As so often, domestic debates about multiculturalism, as well as foreign policy debates about human rights in non- Western countries, revolve around the treatment of women. Yet feminists are no longer even certain how to frame, let alone resolve, the issues raised by veiling, polygamy, and other cultural practices oppressive to women by Western standards. Feminism has become perplexed by the very concept of "culture." This impasse is detrimental both to women's equality and …


The Constitutional Imaginary: Just Stories About We The People, Gerald Torres, Lani Guinier Jan 2012

The Constitutional Imaginary: Just Stories About We The People, Gerald Torres, Lani Guinier

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Same-Sex Marriage, Second-Class Citizenship, And Law's Social Meanings, Michael C. Dorf Oct 2011

Same-Sex Marriage, Second-Class Citizenship, And Law's Social Meanings, Michael C. Dorf

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Government acts, statements, and symbols that carry the social meaning of second-class citizenship may, as a consequence of that fact, violate the Establishment Clause or the constitutional requirement of equal protection. Yet social meaning is often contested. Do laws permitting same-sex couples to form civil unions but not to enter into marriage convey the social meaning that gays and lesbians are second-class citizens? Do official displays of the Confederate battle flag unconstitutionally convey support for slavery and white supremacy? When public schools teach evolution but not creationism, do they show disrespect for creationists? Different audiences reach different conclusions about the …