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Full-Text Articles in Law

An Examination Of The Death Penalty, Alexandra N. Kremer Dec 2018

An Examination Of The Death Penalty, Alexandra N. Kremer

The Downtown Review

The death penalty, or capital punishment, is the use of execution through hanging, beheading, drowning, gas chambers, lethal injection, and electrocution among others in response to a crime. This has spurred much debate on whether it should be used for reasons such as ethics, revenge, economics, effectiveness as a deterrent, and constitutionality. Capital punishment has roots that date back to the 18th century B.C., but, as of 2016, has been abolished in law or practice by more than two thirds of the world’s countries and several states within the United States. Here, the arguments for and against ...


Peer Pressure: Why America Should Succumb To The Territorial Tax Temptation, Paul Petrick Jan 2014

Peer Pressure: Why America Should Succumb To The Territorial Tax Temptation, Paul Petrick

The Global Business Law Review

This Note argues that the United States should adopt a territorial tax system. Currently, the United States is one of a small group of nations that employs a worldwide system of taxation. Under a worldwide system, income is taxed both in the country where it is earned and in the country where the taxpayer resides. Alternatively, under a territorial system, income is taxed only in the country where it is earned. By adopting a territorial system, the United States would jettison the duplicative taxation inherent in the worldwide system. Additionally, the presence of anti-inversion rules, controlled foreign corporation rules, and ...


History In Law, Mythmaking, And Constitutional Legitimacy - Symposium: History And Meaning Of The Constitution, Patrick J. Charles Jan 2014

History In Law, Mythmaking, And Constitutional Legitimacy - Symposium: History And Meaning Of The Constitution, Patrick J. Charles

Cleveland State Law Review

What truly separates an historical inquiry, however, from an originalist inquiry is the degree by which myth consumes fact. Certainly, regardless of whether one is performing an historical or originalist inquiry, the methodological process takes part in generating myth. In terms of where the respective inquiries are to be placed on the spectrum of constitutional mythmaking, however, the standard historical inquiry is far less likely to engage in the process than its originalist counterpart. This is mainly because originalism is not so much about reasoning from known historical truths, but instead about recreating a hypothetical expected legal application of how ...


Saving The Press Clause From Ruin: The Customary Origins Of A 'Free Press' As Interface To The Present And Future, Kevin F. O'Neill, Patrick J. Charles Jan 2012

Saving The Press Clause From Ruin: The Customary Origins Of A 'Free Press' As Interface To The Present And Future, Kevin F. O'Neill, Patrick J. Charles

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Based on a close reading of original sources dating back to America's early colonial period, this article offers a fresh look at the origins of the Press Clause. Then, applying those historical findings, the article critiques recent scholarship in the field and reassesses the Press Clause jurisprudence of the Supreme Court. Finally, the article describes the likely impact of its historical findings if ever employed by the Court in interpreting the Press Clause.


The Rise And Demise Of The Collective Right Interpretation Of The Second Amendment, David T. Hardy Jan 2011

The Rise And Demise Of The Collective Right Interpretation Of The Second Amendment, David T. Hardy

Cleveland State Law Review

This article explores the origins of the two competing theories of the Second Amendment -- the "individual rights" approach which carried the majority in Heller and McDonald, and the variants of a "collective right" theory which was previously dominant in the lower courts, and one variant of which was endorsed by the Heller dissents. Careful analysis of states' bills of rights of the Framing period suggests that two guarantees were desired, by different political factions. Framers closely adhering to the Classical Republican point of view favored protection for the militia as a system; those favoring the emerging Jeffersonian point of view ...


Recurring Storms: Weathering The Future By Understanding The Past , Robert L. Brown Ph.D. Jan 2010

Recurring Storms: Weathering The Future By Understanding The Past , Robert L. Brown Ph.D.

The Global Business Law Review

In this article, I describe the major financial crises that evolved into economic crises during the past four hundred years in Europe, the United States, and Asia, before turning to the 2007-10 global financial and economic crisis. My focus will be Tulipmania of 1637, Mississippi Scheme of 1720, South Sea Bubble of 1720, Great Crash of 1929, Crash of 1987, Asian Financial Crisis of 1997, Dot-com Bubble of 2000, and Financial Crisis of 2007-10. I identify commonalities as well as distinguishing characteristics among the events. In the discussion and description that follows, I note that the tendency is for more ...


Our Forgotten Founders: Reconstruction, Public Education, And Constitutional Heroism, Tom Donnelly Jan 2010

Our Forgotten Founders: Reconstruction, Public Education, And Constitutional Heroism, Tom Donnelly

Cleveland State Law Review

In this Article, I consider the constitutional stories we tell our schoolchildren about the Founding and Reconstruction. To that end, I analyze the relevant sections of our leading high school history textbooks, focusing particularly on the consensus narratives and constitutional heroes that emerge in these accounts. This analysis is vital to more fully understanding the background assumptions that elite lawyers, political leaders, and the wider public bring to bear when they consider the meaning of the Constitution.


Speeding Towards Disaster: How Cleveland's Traffic Cameras Violate The Ohio Constitution, Kevin P. Shannon Jan 2007

Speeding Towards Disaster: How Cleveland's Traffic Cameras Violate The Ohio Constitution, Kevin P. Shannon

Cleveland State Law Review

Part II of this paper describes the history and development of traffic cameras. It includes a discussion of how the two systems used by Cleveland (red-light and speeding cameras) operate. It also gives a general background of the relationship between cities and camera vendors. Part III provides the legal background of traffic cameras. It begins by examining the various arguments that have been leveled against cameras and then examines the litigation to date challenging traffic cameras. Next, this Note discusses the scholarly literature on the subject and explains how this argument situates itself in the debate. Part IV gives traffic ...


The Founders And Slavery, Arthur R. Landever Nov 2006

The Founders And Slavery, Arthur R. Landever

Law Faculty Presentations and Testimony

The point of my talk is that our founders, who our tradition praises profusely of course, as men on Mount Olympus, had moral blinders on. I'm going to talk about key founders. Then I'm going to talk about the key English case, decided in 1772, Somerset v. Stuart. Then I'm going to talk about the Compromises of the 1770s and 1780s. Then I'm going to talk about what we can and can't learn from history. Then I'm going to consider what our generation is doing in the 21st century, considering what might shock our ...


Ohio's Constitutions: An Historical Perspective, Barbara A. Terzian Jan 2004

Ohio's Constitutions: An Historical Perspective, Barbara A. Terzian

Cleveland State Law Review

This article takes us from 1802 to the present, through two state constitutions and four constitutional conventions. The author shows how the crucible of history shaped and reshaped the Ohio Constitution - from early struggles, on the very threshold of statehood, between Jeffersonian Republicans and Federalists; to the pressures exerted in their respective eras by Abolitionists, Progressives, and Prohibitionists; to the quests for suffrage by blacks and women; to the economic impact of the Civil War and the growing industrialization of subsequent decades. Terzian performs this survey with careful attention to the political dynamics at each of Ohio's constitutional conventions ...


Does Counterfactual History Have Any Lessons For Law Teachers And Lawyers? Does It Have Any Value For You, In Particular, In Your Area Of Research Or Teaching?, Arthur R. Landever Aug 2003

Does Counterfactual History Have Any Lessons For Law Teachers And Lawyers? Does It Have Any Value For You, In Particular, In Your Area Of Research Or Teaching?, Arthur R. Landever

Law Faculty Presentations and Testimony

A counterfactual is speculating on the consequences if particular events had not happened as they did. For example, suppose the British had won the American Revolutionary War. What would have been the British policy in North America? As law teachers, lawyers, and perhaps policy makers, counterfactual history has much value for us. Its value, however, clearly depends upon the care we take in choosing a plausible counterfactual assertion, the degree of its breadth or, alternatively, its limited nature, and how we make use of the counterfactual.


Bankruptcy Reform: An Orderly Development Of Public Policy , William T. Bodoh, Lawrence P. Dempsey Jan 2001

Bankruptcy Reform: An Orderly Development Of Public Policy , William T. Bodoh, Lawrence P. Dempsey

Cleveland State Law Review

In legislating the pending bankruptcy "reform," Congress has made many of the key decisions behind closed doors. In fact, the process has been characterized as a congressional effort to pass a "stealth bankruptcy bill." This secrecy brings into question the democratic nature of congressional deliberation. When the Framers designed the legislative branch, open debate was envisioned as the rule, not the exception. Unfortunately, Congress has adopted a secretive, approach to pushing through recent bankruptcy legislation. In a sharp departure from the decades-long congressional approach to bankruptcy legislation, "Congress stopped seeking expert advice and instead turned to special interest lobbyists…” Thus ...


The Matrix Of The Common Law, George L. Haskins Jan 1991

The Matrix Of The Common Law, George L. Haskins

Cleveland State Law Review

Great men have admonished us never to forget the continuing relevance of history in the Anglo-American legal system. We are cautioned to remember that the highly individualistic character of much of our law is explained by its Germanic rather than its Roman roots and, further, that the Anglo-American system has built upon countervailing concepts of relationships which are feudal in origin, and to which rights and duties attach without regard to the will of individuals, which is the underlying principle of classical Roman law. Thus, in our law, powers, rights, and duties stem from relationships such as principal-agent, vendor-purchaser, landlord-tenant ...


Suburban Cleveland's 20-Year Integration Struggle, W Dennis Keating Jan 1988

Suburban Cleveland's 20-Year Integration Struggle, W Dennis Keating

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

A retrospective look at open housing efforts in one of the nation's most segregated regions.


History Of Arbitration Practice And Law, Frank D. Emerson Jan 1970

History Of Arbitration Practice And Law, Frank D. Emerson

Cleveland State Law Review

Long before laws were established, or courts were organized, or judges formulated principles of law, men had resorted to arbitration for the resolving of discord, the adjustment of differences, and the settlement of disputes. It is important to recall the early uses of arbitration at this time when, in the midst of a rising tide of controversy, doubts arise. Arbitration is sometimes thought to be something new, untried, and hazardous to good public relations; or its organization seems to be detrimental to judicial institutions that seem older, but are in reality next-of-kin.