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Let She Who Has The Womb Speak: Regulating The Use Of Human Oocyte Cryopreservation To The Detriment Of Older Women, Browne C. Lewis Jan 2020

Let She Who Has The Womb Speak: Regulating The Use Of Human Oocyte Cryopreservation To The Detriment Of Older Women, Browne C. Lewis

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This article is divided into three parts. Part I examines the arguments in favor of banning human oocyte cryopreservation. Part II explores the reasons some opponents of human oocyte cryopreservation might give to support restrictions on the use of frozen oocytes. Part III analyzes the possible ethical and legal challenges that may arise in the event that the government seeks to ban the use of frozen oocytes or restrict the use of frozen oocytes based solely on the age of the potential mother.


A Deliberate Departure: Making Physician-Assisted Suicide Comfortable For Vulnerable Patients, Browne C. Lewis Jan 2017

A Deliberate Departure: Making Physician-Assisted Suicide Comfortable For Vulnerable Patients, Browne C. Lewis

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This Article is divided into four parts. Part I discusses the history and evolution of the "right to die movement" in the United States. The current legal landscape in the United States is examined in Part II. In Part III, I analyze some of the relevant ethical concerns caused by the availability of physician-assisted suicide. My analysis primarily focuses on the Oregon statutes because it is the oldest physician-assisted suicide law in the United States and has served as a model for laws in the United States and abroad. For example, Lord Falconer's Bill, which was defeated by the ...


The Rise Of The Reproductive Brothel In The Global Economy: Some Thoughts On Reproductive Tourism, Autonomy, And Justice, April L. Cherry Jan 2014

The Rise Of The Reproductive Brothel In The Global Economy: Some Thoughts On Reproductive Tourism, Autonomy, And Justice, April L. Cherry

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This article explores some of the ethical issues raised by the rise of a global reproductive tourism model that includes “the reproductive brothel,” a place where women are gathered together in confined areas and their reproductive capacities sold to men as commodities. After exploring the phenomenon of reproductive tourism as it has developed in India, and the ways in which economic globalization has shaped the practice, the article then considers two ethical responses to the development of the practice of global commercial surrogacy; the first of which focuses on the value of autonomy (both as choice and as dignity), and ...


Dead Men Reproducing: Responding To The Existence Of Afterdeath Children, Browne C. Lewis Jan 2009

Dead Men Reproducing: Responding To The Existence Of Afterdeath Children, Browne C. Lewis

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

The statutory mandates are a step in the right direction, but there is still work that needs to be done. The statutes should be amended to close certain loop holes and to ensure that the physician-facilitated suicide option is available to all of the patients who need it. Persons suffering from physical conditions that will lead to death within six months should not be the only persons permitted to exit gracefully. As long as the safeguards included in the statutes are followed, there is no good reason to prohibit persons suffering from irreversible and incurable physical diseases that lead to ...


From Concierge Medicine To Patient-Centered Medical Homes: International Lessons And The Search For A Better Way To Deliver Primary Health Care In The U.S, Gwendolyn R. Majette Jan 2009

From Concierge Medicine To Patient-Centered Medical Homes: International Lessons And The Search For A Better Way To Deliver Primary Health Care In The U.S, Gwendolyn R. Majette

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This paper will proceed in eight parts. Part II explores why primary care is a critical component of a country's health care delivery system. Part III describes patient and physician dissatisfaction with the current state of primary care delivery in the United States. Parts IV and V describe physician-designed solutions and Congress' responses to them. Part VI describes the role of primary care in the delivery of health services in the international context by focusing on the World Health Organization's Health for All policy and the policies supporting primary care in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Belgium ...


The Puzzle Of Ivf, Dena S. Davis Jan 2006

The Puzzle Of Ivf, Dena S. Davis

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This essay seeks to address a puzzling element of the current political and legal struggles over abortion in the United States: if, as pro-life activists insist, embryos are morally equivalent to born, living persons, then why do these activists not oppose in vitro fertilization (IVF) as aggressively as they oppose abortion? IVF accounts for a significant number of destroyed embryos. Constitutionally, IVF appears to be a much more vulnerable target than abortion. And yet, legislative and political attempts to attack and restrict IVF are few, while attempts to erode women's capability to terminate pregnancies are a constant feature of ...


Stem Cells, Cloning, And Abortion: Making Careful Distinctions, Dena S. Davis Jan 2002

Stem Cells, Cloning, And Abortion: Making Careful Distinctions, Dena S. Davis

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

The current controversy over federal funding for research involving stem cells derived from very early embryos is situated between two other equally difficult issues: abortion and cloning. As Laurie Zoloth (2002) says, talk about stem cells is "directly proximate" to the abortion debate. Nonetheless, a settled position in favor of abortion rights does not necessarily lead to support for research that involves the death of embryos. Nor should opposition to reproductive cloning necessarily entail opposition to therapeutic cloning. There are important ways in which our attitudes toward research with embryonic stem cells ought to be entwined with our thinking about ...


Cloning: A Jewish Law Perspective With A Comparative Study Of Other Abrahamic Traditions, Stephen J. Werber Jan 2000

Cloning: A Jewish Law Perspective With A Comparative Study Of Other Abrahamic Traditions, Stephen J. Werber

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This Article does not provide answers to the religious, ethical, and moral issues posed by advanced reproductive techniques in human cloning. Rather, the preceding analysis and discussion seeks to make a contribution, however modest, to the continuation of the societal discussion that will ultimately yield the answers. This Article presents the common concerns of the religious traditions of Judaism, Islam, and Christianity with their mutual emphasis on preserving the dignity of all beings. This and other common values must form the foundation upon which all questions related to the cloning debate must be predicated.


Ancient Answers To Modern Questions: Death, Dying And Organ Transplants - A Jewish Law Perspective, Stephen J. Werber Jan 1997

Ancient Answers To Modern Questions: Death, Dying And Organ Transplants - A Jewish Law Perspective, Stephen J. Werber

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Core values of the Jewish heritage are life and family, not death. An interpretation of Halachah which permits a broad definition of passive euthanasia without lapsing into acceptance of active euthanasia or its more evil cousin, assisted suicide, is consistent with these values. Also consistent with these values and the Jewish tradition is a modern definition of death which recognizes advances in medical technology that were beyond the knowledge or imagination of those who created the vast body of Rabbinic law. This approach will not only ease the suffering of families, it will allow organ transplants to save the lives ...


Tell Me A Story: Using Short Fiction In Teaching Law And Bioethics, Dena S. Davis Jan 1997

Tell Me A Story: Using Short Fiction In Teaching Law And Bioethics, Dena S. Davis

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

For some years now, I have been experimenting with the use of short stories. Despite rich resources for stories, there remains a void best filled by fiction. When discussing fiction, we can probe, criticize, and express ourselves freely without the constraints we feel when discussing real people. Good fiction lays bare the innermost thoughts and experiences of its characters, perhaps even their dreams and nightmares, in a way that would be intrusive, uncomfortable, or impossible, even in autobiography. When the entire class reads a short story, it provides a pool of shared experience, a fixed point for discussion. Just as ...


The Law And Psychiatry Wars, 1960-1980, Sheldon Gelman Jan 1997

The Law And Psychiatry Wars, 1960-1980, Sheldon Gelman

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

The chapter of the book excerpted below examines litigation developments from the late 1960s to the early 1980s. In law no less than in psychiatry, professional judgments produced anomalous results and professional processes worked in unexpected ways when it came to medications. These departures advanced a public mental health vision that was functionally the same as psychiatrists', even if couched in utterly different and more legalistic terms. Psychiatrists hailed medications as a medical revolution; lawyers by and large ignored the drugs. Yet, both professions reached the same general conclusions about what should be done.Commentators at the time saw an ...


One Way To Be Born? Legislative Inaction And The Posthumous Child, Karin M. Mika Jul 1996

One Way To Be Born? Legislative Inaction And The Posthumous Child, Karin M. Mika

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This article argues that the posthumous child and the rights and responsibilities relating to such a child are directly related to the fundamental right to procreate. It argues that legislation must necessarily incorporate that right in sorting out issues related to the posthumous child and deviate from the standard principles of contract laws which have been applied in the past. This article examines the history, case law, federal decisions, and current legislation pertaining to artificial insemination. It argues that such legislation is inadequate and that legislatures must act promptly to address the realities of the posthumous child.


Therapists' Liability To The Falsely Accused For Inducing Illusory Memories Of Childhood Sexual Abuse: Current Remedies And A Proposed Statute, Joel J. Finer Jan 1996

Therapists' Liability To The Falsely Accused For Inducing Illusory Memories Of Childhood Sexual Abuse: Current Remedies And A Proposed Statute, Joel J. Finer

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

No issue in law and psychiatry has engendered such controversy as the current debate over whether experiences of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) are subject to repression for decades and eventually "recoverable" in therapy long after the event. One principal legal issue has been whether such "recovery" justifies the application of the "recent discovery" basis for tolling the statute of limitations, an issue which becomes significant when an adult psychotherapy patient sues her ostensible molester (often her father or other family member).


A Feminist Understanding Of Sex-Selective Abortion: Solely A Matter Of Choice, April L. Cherry Oct 1995

A Feminist Understanding Of Sex-Selective Abortion: Solely A Matter Of Choice, April L. Cherry

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This essay consists of five sections. The first section describes the problem of sex-selective abortion, including an analysis of sociological data regarding adult preference for male children and its current effects. Section Two discusses various philosophical paradigms and analyses of sex-selective abortion with the goal of developing a coherent philosophical base from which to argue for a policy regarding sex-selective abortion which furthers the goals of gender equality. Section Three addresses the constitutionality of sex-selective abortion prohibitions in light of the Supreme Court's pronouncement in Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey. Section Four outlines the liberal feminist response ...


The Biological Alteration Cases, Sheldon Gelman Jan 1995

The Biological Alteration Cases, Sheldon Gelman

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

State interventions such as drugging dangerous prisoners to “alter the chemical balance in the brain,” sterilizing women involuntarily, or, more modestly, compelling vaccination in order to modify someone's immune system, employ a remarkable and problematic technique. The government biologically alters an individual to suit official policy, tailoring the person's very physical constitution to conform with some public objective. Even when the objective is worthy, such as preventing disease, the technique remains troubling. For in the process of biological alteration, government transforms individuals into instruments of state policy. Focusing on the handful of Supreme Court decisions involving the technique ...


Method In Jewish Bioethics: An Overview, Dena S. Davis Jul 1994

Method In Jewish Bioethics: An Overview, Dena S. Davis

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This essay introduces the reader to the processes by which Jewish ethical-legal reasoning brings old insights to bear on new problems generated by advances in science and medicine. There are at least four reasons why Jewish legal thinking in this area is important to the wider community of Western legal scholars. First, because the law often strives to consider different religious beliefs, it is important to understand these beliefs, the history of these beliefs, and how they function within their religious community.

Second, Jewish legal thinking is important because representatives of religious traditions frequently serve on policy and law-making bodies ...


The Road Not Taken: State Constitutions As An Alternative Source Of Protection For Reproductive Rights, Kevin F. O'Neill Oct 1993

The Road Not Taken: State Constitutions As An Alternative Source Of Protection For Reproductive Rights, Kevin F. O'Neill

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Lawyers seeking constitutional protection for reproductive rights have relied almost exclusively on a liberty/privacy theory under the Federal Constitution. In the wake of Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey, this theory may be seen as providing a floor of minimum protection-preventing states from banning abortion outright. But it is not strong enough to prevent states from enacting restrictions on the availability of abortion. Thus, the battle over reproductive rights may be seen as shifting from one phase ("Can abortion be banned?") to another ("How far can states go in restricting access to abortion'?"). If proponents of reproductive freedom ...


Introduction To Debate (Between N. Morris And R. Bonnie): Should The Insanity Defense Be Abolished?, Joel J. Finer Jan 1985

Introduction To Debate (Between N. Morris And R. Bonnie): Should The Insanity Defense Be Abolished?, Joel J. Finer

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

The author introduces a debate between Professor Norval Morris and Professor Richard Bonnie on the insanity defense.


Mental Hospital Drugging - Atomistic And Structural Remedies, Sheldon Gelman Jan 1984

Mental Hospital Drugging - Atomistic And Structural Remedies, Sheldon Gelman

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Thirty years have passed since the discovery of Thorazine, a neuroleptic drug, and the drugging of American state mental patients has become commonplace. Part I distinguishes between two approaches to remedy--"structural" and "atomistic"--and, as a basis for testing the two, describes a state hospital's handling of the most serious drug side effect. This account also provides a sense of the dimensions of the drugging problems in state hospitals. Part II explores a family of atomistic remedies. These would address drugging problems by seeking to ensure that state doctors are knowledgeable about drugs and/or reasonably careful in ...