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Full-Text Articles in Law

Climate Discrimination, Duane Rudolph Mar 2023

Climate Discrimination, Duane Rudolph

Catholic University Law Review

This Article focuses on the coming legal plight of workers in the United States, who will likely face discrimination as they search for work outside their home states. The Article takes for granted that climate change will have forced those workers across state and international boundaries, a reality dramatically witnessed in the United States during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s. During that environmental emergency (and the devastation it wrought), workers were forced across boundaries only to be violently discriminated against upon arrival in their new domiciles. Such discrimination is likely to recur, and it will threaten the livelihoods of …


The Inconsistencies Of Consent, Chunlin Leonhard Dec 2022

The Inconsistencies Of Consent, Chunlin Leonhard

Catholic University Law Review

U.S. legal scholars have devoted a lot of attention to the role that consent has played in laws and judicial consent jurisprudence. This essay contributes to the discussion on consent by examining judicial approaches to determining the existence of consent in three selected areas--contracts, tort claims involving medical treatment, and criminal cases involving admissibility of confessions, from the late nineteenth century until the present. This article examines how courts have approached the basic factual question of finding consent and how judicial approaches in those areas have evolved over time. The review shows that the late 19th century saw courts adopting …


Where We’Re Going, We Don’T Need Drivers: Autonomous Vehicles And Ai-Chaperone Liability, Peter Y. Kim Oct 2020

Where We’Re Going, We Don’T Need Drivers: Autonomous Vehicles And Ai-Chaperone Liability, Peter Y. Kim

Catholic University Law Review

The future of mainstream autonomous vehicles is approaching in the rearview mirror. Yet, the current legal regime for tort liability leaves an open question on how tortious Artificial Intelligence (AI) devices and systems that are capable of machine learning will be held accountable. To understand the potential answer, one may simply go back in time and see how this question would be answered under traditional torts. This Comment tests whether the incident involving an autonomous vehicle hitting a pedestrian is covered under the traditional torts, argues that they are incapable of solving this novel problem, and ultimately proposes a new …


Re-Evaluating The Demise Of The Average, Ordinary, Reasonable Person: Unintended Consequences In The Law Of Nuisance, George P. Smith & William P. Lane Dec 2018

Re-Evaluating The Demise Of The Average, Ordinary, Reasonable Person: Unintended Consequences In The Law Of Nuisance, George P. Smith & William P. Lane

Catholic University Law Review

This Article advocates for a wider pleading use of the tort of nuisance—this, because of the unresolved complexities in the doctrine of causation which continue to plague an effective use of negligence. The confusing awkwardness or, perhaps, the actual demise, of the notion of an average, ordinary, reasonable person so essential to improving negligent wrongdoing has caused aggravation over the years and, indeed, given rise to a state of torbidity.

The judiciary can more easily resolve this evidentiary quagmire by shifting its judicial attention and analysis to the tort of nuisance. With alarming social indicators and statistical projections, confirming the …


Rape On The Washington Southern: The Tragic Case Of Hines V. Garrett, Michael I. Krauss Mar 2017

Rape On The Washington Southern: The Tragic Case Of Hines V. Garrett, Michael I. Krauss

Catholic University Law Review

In 1919, Ms. Julia May Garret, a young Virginian woman, was brutally raped by two different men as she was walking home after the Washington Southern Railway failed to stop at her designated station. What followed was a legal battle that created precedent still discussed in American casebooks today. Although most case law recognizes that the criminal acts of third parties severs liability because such conduct is considered unforeseeable, Hines v. Garrett held that the harm Ms. Garrett suffered was within the risk created by the railroad’s negligence, and as a common carrier, the railroad owed her a duty to …


Developing Exposure-Based Preconception Tort Liability: A Scientific Challenge To Traditional Tort Concepts, Nicholas P. Putz Mar 2017

Developing Exposure-Based Preconception Tort Liability: A Scientific Challenge To Traditional Tort Concepts, Nicholas P. Putz

Catholic University Law Review

With all of the recent advances in science and technology, humans are being exposed to many new and complex substances for the first time. Such exposure has led to an array of medical complications, ranging from cancer to physical deformity. However, simultaneous advances in other areas of science and technology are, for the first time, beginning to provide humans with the tools to pinpoint the causes of disease. Unfortunately, a sufficient causal diagnosis in the medical field does not directly translate to an actionable harm in the U.S. legal system. In particular, injuries that may have resulted from prior generational …


At The Intersection Of Religious Organization Missions And Employment Laws: The Case Of Minister Employment Suits, Jarod S. Gonzalez Mar 2016

At The Intersection Of Religious Organization Missions And Employment Laws: The Case Of Minister Employment Suits, Jarod S. Gonzalez

Catholic University Law Review

Reviewing the intersection of a religious organization’s right to select employees based on their goals and mission and modern employment law, this article argues that the analysis of the ministerial exception will depend on the type of suit brought. Specifically, the Article identifies five analytical categories: (1) employment discrimination/employment retaliation claims; (2) breach of employment contract claims; (3) whistleblower claims; (4) tort claims; and (5) miscellaneous claims.

The Article begins by describing the ministerial exception and ecclesiastical abstention doctrines that exist under the First Amendment through the lens of the Supreme Court’s decision in Hosanna-Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church & School …


The Affordable Care Act Is Not Tort Reform, Andrew F. Popper Feb 2016

The Affordable Care Act Is Not Tort Reform, Andrew F. Popper

Catholic University Law Review

On March 23, 2010, President Obama signed The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). Prior to the enactment of the PPACA, Congress held several hearings focused on subrogation and relaxation of collateral source restrictions as well as caps on damages in an effort to promote tort reform. While the ACA included provisions on medical liability reform, the suggested tort reform was thwarted, and the ACA had no actual legal effect on limiting medical malpractice liability. This article argues that the reality is that the PPACA has done nothing to change the admissibility of collateral sources nor has it enhanced …


Illegal Agreements And The Lesser Evil Principle, Chunlin Leonhard Sep 2015

Illegal Agreements And The Lesser Evil Principle, Chunlin Leonhard

Catholic University Law Review

When parties enter into an illegal agreement and bring a dispute arising from the transaction before a court, the court finds itself in a difficult position. The court is faced with two competing interests: the importance of both upholding and protecting the dignity of the law and honoring inherent principles of U.S. contract law - freedom of contract and individual autonomy. There exists a common misconception that courts, when presented with illegal contracts, follow the rule of non-enforcement. However, an examination of case law indicates that courts are instead concerned with the consequences of their choices, and have consistently followed …


Whose Best Interest Is It Anyway?: School Administrators' Liability For Student Injury In Virginia, Alison Landry Feb 2015

Whose Best Interest Is It Anyway?: School Administrators' Liability For Student Injury In Virginia, Alison Landry

Catholic University Law Review

In 2012 the Supreme Court of Virginia declined to recognize a special relationship between a school’s vice principal and the school’s students. Without the third person liability that accompanies special relationships, a vice principal is allowed to put student safety at the bottom of his to-do list. This Note analyzes why the Supreme Court of Virginia’s decision in Burns v. Gagnon should have found that a special relationship existed between a vice principal and his students. Declining to recognize this special relationship has left school administrators with little risk of liability for a student’s harm. This Note discusses the few …


Of Trees, Vegetation, And Torts: Re-Conceptualizing Reasonable Land Use, L. Daniel Bidwell Jan 2014

Of Trees, Vegetation, And Torts: Re-Conceptualizing Reasonable Land Use, L. Daniel Bidwell

Catholic University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Sacrificial Lambs: Compensating First Subscribers To Fda-Approved Medications For Postmarketing Injuries Resulting From Unlabeled Adverse Events, Rodney K. Miller Jan 2013

Sacrificial Lambs: Compensating First Subscribers To Fda-Approved Medications For Postmarketing Injuries Resulting From Unlabeled Adverse Events, Rodney K. Miller

Catholic University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Please Watch Your Language!: The Chronic Problem Of Assumption Of Risk, Dale L. Moore Jan 2011

Please Watch Your Language!: The Chronic Problem Of Assumption Of Risk, Dale L. Moore

Catholic University Law Review

No abstract provided.