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Supreme Court of the United States

1990

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Articles 1 - 30 of 56

Full-Text Articles in Law

Controlling Discretion By Administrative Regulations: The Use, Misuse, And The Nonuse Of Police Rules And Policies In Fourth Amendment Adjudication, Wayne R. Lafave Dec 1990

Controlling Discretion By Administrative Regulations: The Use, Misuse, And The Nonuse Of Police Rules And Policies In Fourth Amendment Adjudication, Wayne R. Lafave

Michigan Law Review

In assaying fourth amendment jurisprudence, it is useful to take into account available knowledge regarding the actual search and seizure practices of the police. Especially helpful is the perspective afforded by the American Bar Foundation's Survey of the Administration of Criminal Justice in the United States, which ranks as the preeminent empirical study of law enforcement procedures in this country. Despite the fact - or, more likely, because of the fact that the ABF Survey was published over twenty years ago, certain insights from that study highlight some recent and significant changes in this corpus juris inconstans .

Clearly "the most ...


Rent Appropriation And The Labor Law Doctrine Of Successorship, Keith Hylton Nov 1990

Rent Appropriation And The Labor Law Doctrine Of Successorship, Keith Hylton

Faculty Scholarship

When there is a change of corporate control in a business enterprise a question arises as to whether the new employer should be bound by the predecessor's collective bargaining relationship with the union representing the predecessor's employees. This is known as the successorship problem in labor law.' Successorship doctrine is complex and controversial. Several commentators have attempted to reconcile Supreme Court decisions and to ascertain the assumptions underlying the Court's opinions in this area.2 This Article does not attempt to do this, although paradoxically, the arguments presented may lead to reconciliation of many of the Supreme ...


A Rational Choice Theory Of Supreme Court Statutory Decisions With Applications To The State Farm And Grove City Cases, Rafael Gely, Pablo T. Spiller Oct 1990

A Rational Choice Theory Of Supreme Court Statutory Decisions With Applications To The State Farm And Grove City Cases, Rafael Gely, Pablo T. Spiller

Faculty Publications

In this article we follow the recent developments of the modern theory of administrative agencies, by developing a rational choice theory of the Supreme Court. Our framework combines two of the main characteristics of this literature: namely, the rational choice modeling strategy with the notion that institutions matter in the design of public policy. We differ basically by modeling the Supreme Court as a self-interested, ideologically motivated institution, making its decisions subject not to the traditional legal rules of precedent, but to the constraints arising from the political interests of other institutions of government-namely, Congress and the President.


A Judicial Postscript On The Church-State Debates Of 1989: How Porous The Wall, How Civil The State?, William W. Van Alstyne Oct 1990

A Judicial Postscript On The Church-State Debates Of 1989: How Porous The Wall, How Civil The State?, William W. Van Alstyne

Faculty Publications

This work is a continuation of the debate regarding the Establishment Clause. The focus lies with Justice O’Connor’s concurrence in County of Allegheny v. ACLU and how this opinion harkens back to a concept shared by Jefferson and Madison, that the establishment clause is designed to prevent government favoritism.


The Case Of The Amorous Defendant: Criticizing Absolute Stare Decisis For Statutory Cases, William N. Eskridge Jr. Aug 1990

The Case Of The Amorous Defendant: Criticizing Absolute Stare Decisis For Statutory Cases, William N. Eskridge Jr.

Michigan Law Review

Earlier in this the first year of the new millennium, Professor Larry Marshall was appointed Chief Justice of the United States. The first important case coming before the Marshall Court involved the government's prosecution of Frankly Amorous under the White Slave Traffic Act of June 25, 1910 (the Mann Act), as amended. Defendant Amorous was a law student in Virginia who paid for the airplane ticket of his female lover to travel from North Carolina to Virginia for the admitted purpose of having extramarital sexual relations. The U.S. Attorney prosecuted Amorous for violating the Mann Act, which criminalizes ...


Making Sense Of Billboard Law: Justifying Prohibitions And Exemptions, R. Douglass Bond Aug 1990

Making Sense Of Billboard Law: Justifying Prohibitions And Exemptions, R. Douglass Bond

Michigan Law Review

Part I of this Note surveys the trends in the aesthetic regulation of billboards, culminating in the Supreme Court of California's decision in Metromedia, Inc. v. City of San Diego, and the Supreme Court's review of that decision. Part II analyzes the five Metromedia opinions in order to present properly the contemporary debate over billboard law. It inquires whether a sign prohibition should hinge on the commercial or noncommercial status of the targeted signs. Part III indicates how ambiguities in the Metromedia plurality opinion have produced the conflict in lower courts between the commercial/noncommercial distinction and the ...


Contempt Of Congress: A Reply To The Critics Of An Absolute Rule Of Statutory Stare Decisis, Lawrence C. Marshall Aug 1990

Contempt Of Congress: A Reply To The Critics Of An Absolute Rule Of Statutory Stare Decisis, Lawrence C. Marshall

Michigan Law Review

In the law school tradition of "suspending belief," Professor Eskridge has created a hypothetical in which I, in my first case as Chief Justice of the United States, must decide whether to adhere to various antiquated and seemingly erroneous precedents interpreting the Mann Act. Eskridge assumes that I will feel compelled to adhere to these decisions, for to do otherwise, he contends, would force me to abandon the proposal for an absolute rule of statutory stare decisis that I advanced recently in this Law Review. Eskridge then offers a variety of critiques of my thesis, coming from perspectives as diverse ...


Academic Freedom And The First Amendment In The Supreme Court Of The United States: An Unhurried Historical Review, William W. Van Alstyne Jul 1990

Academic Freedom And The First Amendment In The Supreme Court Of The United States: An Unhurried Historical Review, William W. Van Alstyne

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Pure Politics, Girardeau A. Spann Jun 1990

Pure Politics, Girardeau A. Spann

Michigan Law Review

Part I of this article considers the impact that judicial discretion has on the traditional model of judicial review, and that model's reliance on the Supreme Court as the primary guardian of minority interests. Part II argues that the interests of racial minorities can be better advanced through the ordinary political process than through the process of Supreme Court adjudication. Part Ill emphasizes that minority participation in Supreme Court proceedings cannot ultimately be avoided and, accordingly, suggests a political model of the Court that minorities can use in an effort to neutralize the Court's distortion of the political ...


Applying Section 2 Of The Voting Rights Act To Single-Member Offices, Edward J. Sebold Jun 1990

Applying Section 2 Of The Voting Rights Act To Single-Member Offices, Edward J. Sebold

Michigan Law Review

This Note questions whether an exemption for single-member offices is justified. Part I provides a brief overview of the Voting Rights Act and the types of discrimination in the political process to which it applies., Part I then reviews the decisions on single-member offices, including the courts' attempts to define single-member offices. This Part concludes neither Congress nor the Supreme Court dictates an exemption for single-member offices. Instead, single-member offices should be open to challenge if they hamper the achievement of section 2's goals. Part II identifies the goals of section 2 by developing a number of theories to ...


Beyond The Warren Court And Its Conservative Critics: Toward A Unified Theory Of Constitutional Criminal Procedure, Donald A. Dripps Jun 1990

Beyond The Warren Court And Its Conservative Critics: Toward A Unified Theory Of Constitutional Criminal Procedure, Donald A. Dripps

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Part I develops more fully the differences that divide liberal and conservative commentators on criminal procedure, taking special note of the series of Reports prepared by the Justice Department's Office of Legal Policy and published recently in the University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform. Part II explains my disquiet with the suggestion that original-meaning jurisprudence ought to guide criminal procedure doctrine. Part II also defends the thesis that the fourteenth amendment protects the individual interest in freedom from unjust punishment, rather than any abstract interest in truth for its own sake. Part III considers two familiar controversies in ...


The Truth About Massiah, James J. Tomkovicz Jun 1990

The Truth About Massiah, James J. Tomkovicz

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

First, the Article will summarize the Justice Department's discussion of the Massiah right to counsel and the exclusion of evidence under Massiah. Next, it will evaluate the nature of the Report and the character of legal scholarship. Finally, it will explore the substantive debate over Massiah. In that section, the Article will point out the matters on which the DOJ and I agree, will attempt to frame the fundamental questions raised by the Massiah doctrine, and will investigate potential sources of answers to those constitutional questions. Ultimately, it will provide the answers that I prefer, explaining the premises that ...


A Republican Chief Justice, Mark V. Tushnet May 1990

A Republican Chief Justice, Mark V. Tushnet

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Justice Rehnquist and the Constitution by Sue Davis


Political Consensus, Constitutional Formulae, And The Rationale For Judicial Review, Martin H. Redish May 1990

Political Consensus, Constitutional Formulae, And The Rationale For Judicial Review, Martin H. Redish

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Constitutional Cultures; The Mentality and Consequences of Judicial Review by Robert Nagel


Mr. Bork Inquires Into The Origin And Nature Of Permissiveness, Lyle Denniston May 1990

Mr. Bork Inquires Into The Origin And Nature Of Permissiveness, Lyle Denniston

Michigan Law Review

A Review of The Tempting of America: The Political Seduction of the Law by Robert H. Bork


The Supreme Court In Politics, Terrance Sandalow May 1990

The Supreme Court In Politics, Terrance Sandalow

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Battle for Justice: How the Bork Nomination Shook America by Ethan Bronner


The Interpreters, Kenneth L. Karst May 1990

The Interpreters, Kenneth L. Karst

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Justice as Translation: An Essay in Cultural and Legal Criticism by James Boyd White


Why Holmes?, Mathias Reimann May 1990

Why Holmes?, Mathias Reimann

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Honorable Justice: The Life of Oliver Wendell Holmes by Sheldon M. Novick


The Conflict Concerning Expert Witness And Legal Conclusions, Charles W. Ehrhardt Apr 1990

The Conflict Concerning Expert Witness And Legal Conclusions, Charles W. Ehrhardt

Scholarly Publications

No abstract provided.


The Constitutional Catechism Of Antonin Scalia, George Kannar Apr 1990

The Constitutional Catechism Of Antonin Scalia, George Kannar

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


The Admission Of Government Fact Findings Under Federal Rule Of Evidence 803(8)(C): Limiting The Dangers Of Unreliable Hearsay, Steven P. Grossman, Stephen J. Shapiro Apr 1990

The Admission Of Government Fact Findings Under Federal Rule Of Evidence 803(8)(C): Limiting The Dangers Of Unreliable Hearsay, Steven P. Grossman, Stephen J. Shapiro

All Faculty Scholarship

Federal Rule of Evidence 803(8)(C), an exception to the rule against admission of hearsay, permits introduction of public records or reports containing the fact findings of the reporter without requiring the reporter to appear at trial. These fact findings can be based upon the reporter's own observations and calculations or information imparted to the reporter from sources having no connection to any public agency whatsoever. Rule 803(8)(C) has also been used as the vehicle for presenting juries with fact findings from hearings conducted by public officials. The rule would seem to allow these fact findings ...


A Prior Restraint By Any Other Name: The Judicial Response To Media Challenges Of Gag Orders Directed At Trial Participants, René L. Todd Apr 1990

A Prior Restraint By Any Other Name: The Judicial Response To Media Challenges Of Gag Orders Directed At Trial Participants, René L. Todd

Michigan Law Review

Gag orders directed at trial participants do not directly intrude into the media's editorial process, but instead result in a reduction of the total communication available regarding trial proceedings. In this way, participant-directed gag orders are effective, albeit indirect, restraints upon the media. This Note examines the dynamics of these participant-directed restrictions and their consequent effect upon the media. Part I examines participant-directed gag orders in relation to traditional prior restraint doctrine. After discussing the history of prior restraint doctrine and the present standard of prior restraint analysis, Part I relates efforts by courts to apply. prior restraint doctrine ...


That Old Due Process Magic: Growth Control And The Federal Constitution, Keith R. Denny Apr 1990

That Old Due Process Magic: Growth Control And The Federal Constitution, Keith R. Denny

Michigan Law Review

This Note argues that the interests of nonmunicipal federal citizens in being able freely to migrate about the nation are not adequately accounted for in a due process analysis which sanctions regulations with any, even a debatable, relation to the public welfare.

More adaptable and appropriate are the constitutional safeguards designed to protect the interests of nonmunicipal federal citizens: the privileges and immunities clause, the right of interstate travel, and the commerce clause. This Note concludes that GCOs should be measured against these safeguards and not the standards of the due process clause. When so reviewed, GCOs are found wanting ...


Progressive And Conservative Constitutionalism, Robin West Feb 1990

Progressive And Conservative Constitutionalism, Robin West

Michigan Law Review

The article's central thesis is that the understandings of the constitutional tradition most central to both paradigms are determined by sometimes implicit, but more often explicit, political dispositions toward various forms of social and private power, and the normative authority to which social and private power gives rise. Very broadly, conservative constitutionalists view private or social normative authority as the legitimate and best source of guidance for state action; accordingly, they view both the Constitution and constitutional adjudication as means of preserving and protecting that authority and the power that undergirds it against either legislative or judicial encroachment. Progressive ...


The Supreme Court And The First Amendment: The 1989-90 Term, Elliot M. Mincberg Jan 1990

The Supreme Court And The First Amendment: The 1989-90 Term, Elliot M. Mincberg

NYLS Journal of Human Rights

No abstract provided.


Religious Free Speech Rights Of Students In Public Schools: The Educator's Dilemma, Rosalie Levinson Jan 1990

Religious Free Speech Rights Of Students In Public Schools: The Educator's Dilemma, Rosalie Levinson

Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Construction On The Road To Recovery: New York Limits Loss Of Enjoyment Of Life, Bonnie Sue Goodman Jan 1990

Construction On The Road To Recovery: New York Limits Loss Of Enjoyment Of Life, Bonnie Sue Goodman

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


The October 1989 Supreme Court Term And Antitrust: Power, Access, And Legitimacy, Stephen Calkins Jan 1990

The October 1989 Supreme Court Term And Antitrust: Power, Access, And Legitimacy, Stephen Calkins

Law Faculty Research Publications

No abstract provided.


Indeterminacy And Incommensurability In Constitutional Law, Steven L. Winter Jan 1990

Indeterminacy And Incommensurability In Constitutional Law, Steven L. Winter

Law Faculty Research Publications

Progressive constitutional scholarship has yet fully to confront the implications of the conservative shift in constitutional law. Liberal critics continue to seek governing constitutional theories with which to constrain decisionmaking by judges of a notably different mind. Other, more radical scholars employ the indeterminacy and "law is politics" critiques in a more open attempt at displacement. Neither approach is viable, however. Each presumes the primacy of the autonomous, self-directing subject; each resists recognition of the situated nature of all human endeavor. This essay adopts the alternative strategy: exploring the implications of situatedness as they apply to the development, practice, and ...


Meeting The Enemy, Robert F. Nagel Jan 1990

Meeting The Enemy, Robert F. Nagel

Articles

No abstract provided.