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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Federal Option: Delaware As A De Facto Agency, Omari Scott Simmons Oct 2021

The Federal Option: Delaware As A De Facto Agency, Omari Scott Simmons

Washington Law Review

Despite over 200 years of deliberation and debate, the United States has not adopted a federal corporate chartering law. Instead, Delaware is the “Federal Option” for corporate law and adjudication. The contemporary federal corporate chartering debate is, in part, a referendum on its role. Although the federal government has regulated other aspects of interstate commerce and has the power to charter corporations and preempt Delaware pursuant to its Commerce Clause power, it has not done so. Despite the rich and robust scholarly discussion of Delaware’s jurisdictional dominance, its role as a de facto national regulator remains underdeveloped. This Article addresses …


Put A Cork In It: The Use Of H.R. 161 To End Direct Wine Shipping Throughout The States Once And For All, Victoria H. Jones Jul 2021

Put A Cork In It: The Use Of H.R. 161 To End Direct Wine Shipping Throughout The States Once And For All, Victoria H. Jones

Journal of Food Law & Policy

Due to Congress' recent agenda, oenophiles throughout the country are up in arms about the possible threat to their beloved wine. Wine lovers and other alcohol enthusiasts face the very real fear that access to their favorite products may soon be heavily restricted. This is in large part attributed to the fact that House Resolution 1161 would effectively change the ways in which states regulate alcohol shipment. The possible implications of this bill range from the forced shutdown of many wineries and distilleries due to lack of funding, to the smaller effects of regulation such as the inability of customers …


American Common Market Redux, Richard Collins Jan 2021

American Common Market Redux, Richard Collins

Publications

The Tennessee Wine case, decided in June of 2019, had a major effect on the path of the law for an issue not argued in it. The Supreme Court affirmed invalidity of a protectionist state liquor regulation that discriminated against interstate commerce in violation of the dormant commerce clause doctrine. Its holding rejected a vigorous defense based on the special terms of the Twenty-first Amendment that ended Prohibition—an issue of interest only to those involved in markets for alcoholic drinks. However, the Court’s opinion removed serious doubts about validity of the Doctrine itself, even though the petitioner and supporting amici …


Interstate Commerce In Cannabis, Robert Mikos Jan 2021

Interstate Commerce In Cannabis, Robert Mikos

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

By the end of 2020, more than thirty states had legalized cannabis containing tetrahydrocannabinol ("THC") for at least some purposes.' Each of these states has authorized firms to produce and sell cannabis within its borders. In 2019, those state-licensed firms did a brisk business, selling more than $13 billion worth of cannabis.

However, none of that $13 billion of cannabis is now being sold (legally) across state lines. Instead, each legalization state now has its own, hermetically sealed local cannabis market, supplied entirely by cannabis cultivated and processed inside the state. For example, the $1.75 billion worth of cannabis that …


The Case For Lgbt Equality: Reviving The Political Process Doctrine And Repurposing The Dormant Commerce Clause, Terri R. Day, Danielle Weatherby Jan 2016

The Case For Lgbt Equality: Reviving The Political Process Doctrine And Repurposing The Dormant Commerce Clause, Terri R. Day, Danielle Weatherby

Brooklyn Law Review

As a reaction to the Supreme Court’s historic marriage equality decision earlier this summer, many Southern state legislators opposing the trend toward LGBT-protective laws have proposed legislation that would essentially prohibit municipalities from carving out new antidiscrimination protections for the LGBT community. Conservative Senator Bart Hester spearheaded the passing of one of these “anti” antidiscrimination laws in Arkansas, and states like Texas, West Virginia, Michigan, and Oklahoma are not far behind. These “Hester-type laws” are strikingly similar to the Colorado amendment struck down by the Romer v. Evans Court 20 years ago. Both the Colorado amendment and the new wave …


North Carolina State Board Of Dental Examiners V. Ftc: Aligning Antitrust Law With Commerce Clause Jurisprudence Through A Natural Shift Of State-Federal Balance Of Power, Marie Forney Jan 2016

North Carolina State Board Of Dental Examiners V. Ftc: Aligning Antitrust Law With Commerce Clause Jurisprudence Through A Natural Shift Of State-Federal Balance Of Power, Marie Forney

Indiana Law Journal

The Supreme Court’s holding in North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners v. FTC (NC Dental)1 in February 2015 demonstrates a natural shift in the balance of power from the states to the national government. As the country’s interstate and international economy has become more integrated, federal authority has likewise expanded.2 And although the federalism dichotomy has undergone periodic back-and-forth “swings” since the nation’s founding, the end result has been a net increase in federal power. NC Dental exemplifies this trend toward increasing national au-thority through the organic development of interstate commerce.


Energy Policy: A Test For Federalism, Jon L. Mills, R. D. Woodson Aug 2015

Energy Policy: A Test For Federalism, Jon L. Mills, R. D. Woodson

Jon L. Mills

This Article will examine the bases of state and federal power, exploring areas of both potential and existing conflict within the energy field. Situations in which either the state or federal government appears to have exclusive authority also will be scrutinized. Possible answers to problems caused by the clashing of governmental interests will be suggested, with an eye toward aiding policymakers to reach agreements which may avert such conflicts. Finally, a prognosis of the future of federalism in regard to the energy issue will be offered.


Comptroller V. Wynne: Internal Consistency, A National Marketplace, And Limits On State Sovereignty To Tax, Michael S. Knoll, Ruth Mason Jan 2015

Comptroller V. Wynne: Internal Consistency, A National Marketplace, And Limits On State Sovereignty To Tax, Michael S. Knoll, Ruth Mason

All Faculty Scholarship

On November 12, 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral argument in Comptroller of the Treasury v. Wynne. The case, which has already been called the Court’s most important state tax case in decades, asks how the dormant Commerce Clause restrains state taxation of individual income. Because Wynne lacks the usual indicia of “certworthiness,” the case raises the possibility that the Court will reshape the constitutional balance between the states’ sovereign interest in collecting taxes and the national interest in maintaining an open economy.

The challenge for the Court, whose dormant Commerce Clause rulings have attracted intense criticism, is …


The Dormant Commerce Clause And California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard, Kathryn Abbott Sep 2013

The Dormant Commerce Clause And California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard, Kathryn Abbott

Michigan Journal of Environmental & Administrative Law

California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS), enacted as part of the State’s pioneering Global Warming Solutions Act (AB 32), purports to regulate the amount of carbon emissions associated with fuels consumed in the state. Part of this scheme involves assigning numeric scores to vehicle fuels reflecting the amount of carbon emissions associated with their production, transportation, and use. The scores are part of a “cap-and-trade” scheme to lower the state’s total amount of carbon emissions associated with fuel use. Out-of-state industry groups brought a challenge in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California, alleging that the …


Finding A Compromise: The Struggle Between Federal Regulation And State Sovereignty - Analyzing The Effects Of Mid-Con Freight Systems, Inc. V. Michigan Public Service Commission , Sindy Lie Apr 2013

Finding A Compromise: The Struggle Between Federal Regulation And State Sovereignty - Analyzing The Effects Of Mid-Con Freight Systems, Inc. V. Michigan Public Service Commission , Sindy Lie

Journal of the National Association of Administrative Law Judiciary

This case note will explore the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in Mid-Con Freight Systems, Inc. v. Michigan Public Service Commission. Part II will outline the historical background of the law at hand. Part III will lay out the essential facts of the case. Part IV will analyze and critique the majority and dissenting opinions. Part V will discuss the legal, administrative, and societal impact of the holding. Finally, Part VI will conclude the case note.


Napa To New York With The Click Of A Mouse: The Dormant Commerce Clause And The Direct Shipment Of Wine To Consumers As Discussed In Granholm V. Heald , Shirlene Love Apr 2013

Napa To New York With The Click Of A Mouse: The Dormant Commerce Clause And The Direct Shipment Of Wine To Consumers As Discussed In Granholm V. Heald , Shirlene Love

Journal of the National Association of Administrative Law Judiciary

This case note examines the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Granholm v Heald. Part II will explore the history of the Dormant Commerce Clause and Twenty-First Amendment; Part III will present the facts of the case; Part IV will discuss and analyze the majority and two dissenting opinions; Part V will speculate about the future impact of this decision; and Part VI will conclude.


Dormancy Versus Innovation: A Next Generation Dormant Commerce Clause, Sam Kalen Jan 2013

Dormancy Versus Innovation: A Next Generation Dormant Commerce Clause, Sam Kalen

Oklahoma Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Commerce Clause Quartet, Martin A. Schwartz, Leon D. Lazer Jun 2011

The Commerce Clause Quartet, Martin A. Schwartz, Leon D. Lazer

Martin A. Schwartz

No abstract provided.


Noontime Dumping: Why States Have Broad Discretion To Regulate Onboard Treatments Of Ballast Water, Kyle H. Landis-Marinello Oct 2007

Noontime Dumping: Why States Have Broad Discretion To Regulate Onboard Treatments Of Ballast Water, Kyle H. Landis-Marinello

Michigan Law Review

Ballast water discharges from shipping vessels are responsible for spreading numerous forms of aquatic invasive species, a form of biological pollution that leads to billions of dollars in annual costs. In the wake of inaction from the federal government and inaction from the shipping industry, several Great Lakes states are currently considering legislation to address the problem. Michigan has already passed a law to prevent ballast water introductions of invasive species. As states begin to regulate ballast water discharges from oceangoing vessels, such laws will likely face challenges based on the constitutional principles of the Dormant Commerce Clause and the …


Some Preliminary Thoughts On Contrasts And Convergence In Environmental And Natural Resources Law, Karin P. Sheldon Jun 2007

Some Preliminary Thoughts On Contrasts And Convergence In Environmental And Natural Resources Law, Karin P. Sheldon

The Future of Natural Resources Law and Policy (Summer Conference, June 6-8)

16 pages.

Includes bibliographical references


Federalism Revisited: The Supreme Court Resurrects The Notion Of Enumerated Powers By Limiting Congress's Attempt To Federalize Crime Comment., Larry E. Gee Jan 1995

Federalism Revisited: The Supreme Court Resurrects The Notion Of Enumerated Powers By Limiting Congress's Attempt To Federalize Crime Comment., Larry E. Gee

St. Mary's Law Journal

This Comment argues the federal system must be preserved and the Supreme Court should build upon the interpretation of the Commerce Clause in United States v. Lopez to reinstate the Framers’ vision of federalism. The social justifications for the Court’s expansive construction of the Commerce Clause during the past sixty years no longer existed to justify the Gun-Free School Zones Act of 1990. Part II of this Comment traces the background of Commerce Clause jurisprudence, focusing on social justifications for traditional rubber stamping of Congress’s broad exercises of power. Part III reviews the Fifth Circuit’s reasoning in deeming the Gun-Free …


The Commerce Clause Quartet, Martin A. Schwartz, Leon D. Lazer Jan 1995

The Commerce Clause Quartet, Martin A. Schwartz, Leon D. Lazer

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Corporate Pro-Choice: New York Assumes An Anti-Takover Position, Paula Walter Jan 1992

Corporate Pro-Choice: New York Assumes An Anti-Takover Position, Paula Walter

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Market-Share Liability After Hymowitz And Conley: Exploring The Limits Of Judicial Power, Christopher J. Mcguire May 1991

Market-Share Liability After Hymowitz And Conley: Exploring The Limits Of Judicial Power, Christopher J. Mcguire

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

This Note surveys the development of market-share liability and examines the limits on the power of state and federal courts to impose liability on defendants through market-share liability. Part I examines briefly the development of market-share liability in the early 1980s. It then explores how the New York Court of Appeals extended market-share liability in Hymowitz v. Eli Lilly and explores this case's ramifications. Part I also draws on a recent Florida case, Conley v. Boyle Drug Co., for further insight into the problems surrounding market-share liability litigation. Part II argues that jurisdictional limitations, such as standing to sue …


Untangling The Market-Participant Exemption To The Dormant Commerce Clause, Dan T. Coenen Dec 1989

Untangling The Market-Participant Exemption To The Dormant Commerce Clause, Dan T. Coenen

Michigan Law Review

This article explores the market-participant rule. Part I traces the rule's evolution and shows how it has proven less rigid than some initially feared. Part II probes the roots of the rule by challenging justifications for it suggested by other observers. Part III offers an alternative theory of the market-participant doctrine, arguing in particular that it rests on a cluster of rationales that properly have led· the Court to uphold marketplace preferences as the "general rule." Part IV builds on Part III to advance a new, four-part framework for evaluating market-participant issues. Part V then uses that framework to apply …


Siamese Essays: (I) Cts Corp. V. Dynamics Corp. Of America And Dormant Commerce Clause Doctrine; (Ii) Extraterritorial State Legislation, Donald H. Regan Jan 1987

Siamese Essays: (I) Cts Corp. V. Dynamics Corp. Of America And Dormant Commerce Clause Doctrine; (Ii) Extraterritorial State Legislation, Donald H. Regan

Articles

What follows is two essays, related as Siamese twins. Both essays developed from a single conception. They are distinct, but they remain connected by a shared subtopic. The first essay is about CTS Corp. v. Dynamics Corp. of America1 as a contribution to dormant commerce clause doctrine. The second essay is about the constitutional principle that states may not legislate extraterritorially, which I shall refer to as the "extraterritoriality principle." The shared subtopic is the extraterritoriality problem in CTS. (There is an extraterritoriality problem in CTS, even though the Court does not discuss it in those terms.) I could have …


The Supreme Court And State Protectionism: Making Sense Of The Dormant Commerce Clause, Donald H. Regan Jan 1986

The Supreme Court And State Protectionism: Making Sense Of The Dormant Commerce Clause, Donald H. Regan

Articles

For almost fifty years, scholars have urged the Court to "balance" in dormant commerce clause cases; and the scholars have imagined that the Court was following their advice. The Court has indeed claimed to balance, winning scholarly approval. But the Court knows better than the scholars. Despite what the Court has said, it has not been balancing. It has been following a simpler and better-justified course. In the central area of dormant commerce clause jurisprudence, comprising what I shall call "movement-of-goods" cases), the Court has been concerned exclusively with preventing states from engaging in purposeful economic protectionism. Not only is …


Second Generation State Takeover Legislation: Maryland Takes A New Tack, Michigan Law Review Nov 1984

Second Generation State Takeover Legislation: Maryland Takes A New Tack, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

This Note examines the approach recently adopted by the Maryland legislature in special session one year after the Supreme Court's decision in MITE. Maryland has departed radically from the regulatory approach of first generation statutes; however, this Note argues that the statute has failed to escape the constitutional infirmities of its predecessors. Part I outlines the various mechanisms that regulate acquisition of corporate control: the federal tender offer regulatory mechanism known as the Williams Act, state takeover legislation such as the Illinois statute invalidated in MITE, and the new Maryland statute. Part II analyzes the debate concerning the …


Toward A Constitutional State Tender Offer Statute, Sam Wolff Jan 1984

Toward A Constitutional State Tender Offer Statute, Sam Wolff

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

No abstract provided.


Energy Policy: A Test For Federalism, Jon L. Mills, R.D. Woodson Jan 1976

Energy Policy: A Test For Federalism, Jon L. Mills, R.D. Woodson

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Article will examine the bases of state and federal power, exploring areas of both potential and existing conflict within the energy field. Situations in which either the state or federal government appears to have exclusive authority also will be scrutinized. Possible answers to problems caused by the clashing of governmental interests will be suggested, with an eye toward aiding policymakers to reach agreements which may avert such conflicts. Finally, a prognosis of the future of federalism in regard to the energy issue will be offered.


Constitutional Law - Commerce Clause - Local Smoke Control Ordinance Not An Undue Burden On Interstate Commerce, John M. Niehuss Apr 1961

Constitutional Law - Commerce Clause - Local Smoke Control Ordinance Not An Undue Burden On Interstate Commerce, John M. Niehuss

Michigan Law Review

In accordance with a scheme of federal ship inspection, appellant possessed certificates which permitted its ships to operate on the Great Lakes and which specified the type of boiler which might be used. While two of its ships were docked in Detroit, smoke was emitted from their boilers in violation of the minimum density and duration requirements of the Detroit Smoke Abatement Code. The equipment which appellant was then using made compliance with the ordinance impossible. When criminal proceedings were instituted against appellant, it brought an action to enjoin the City of Detroit from enforcing the ordinance on the theory …


Constitutional Law--State Taxation Of Interstate Commerce, William C. Brafford Jr. Jan 1954

Constitutional Law--State Taxation Of Interstate Commerce, William C. Brafford Jr.

Kentucky Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Labor Law-State Regulation Of Recognition And Organizational Picketing, Richard D. Rohr S.Ed. Jun 1953

Labor Law-State Regulation Of Recognition And Organizational Picketing, Richard D. Rohr S.Ed.

Michigan Law Review

Just as the fixed circumference of spheres of influence tends to reduce clash and friction in world affairs, so peaceful industrial relations are fostered by definite legal rules of conduct. Recent litigation, both by its amount and variety of result, testifies to a continued uncertainty as to the permissible scope of peaceful, primary picketing. The major problems may be subsumed under the loose category of "stranger picketing," but a distinction of some legal significance has developed within this category between picketing by the non-representative union for recognition by the employer and picketing for organizational purposes, that is, to win the …


Labor Law--Federal-State Relations--Validity Of Michigan's Labor Mediation Act, R. L. Storms S.Ed. Nov 1950

Labor Law--Federal-State Relations--Validity Of Michigan's Labor Mediation Act, R. L. Storms S.Ed.

Michigan Law Review

Plaintiff labor union called a strike against defendant auto corporation in May, 1948, without conforming to the prescribed state procedure. The purpose of the strike was to enforce demands for higher wages and the strike was conducted peacefully. To enjoin possible criminal prosecution the union instituted the instant suit in the state courts, contending that the Michigan labor mediation law, the much publicized "Bonine-Tripp Act," violated the due process and commerce clauses of the Federal Constitution. The Michigan Supreme Court reversed the decision of the trial court which had granted the injunction. On appeal, held, reversed. Congress has occupied …


Labor Law-Relationship Of Federal And State Authority Over Labor Relations, Ralph E. Hunt S.Ed. Jun 1949

Labor Law-Relationship Of Federal And State Authority Over Labor Relations, Ralph E. Hunt S.Ed.

Michigan Law Review

In three recent cases, the United States Supreme Court has been required to determine the impact of federal labor relations legislation on certain state enactments in this area. The importance of these decisions, concerning a problem which has caused difficulty since enactment of the National Labor Relations Act in 1935, is increased by their consideration of the significance of the amendments contained in the Labor-Management Relations Act of 1947.

(1.) The appellant La Crosse Co., which handled interstate telephone calls, had made a collective bargaining agreement with appellant A. F. of L. union, to continue from year to year. During …