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Full-Text Articles in Law

Penyelesaian Perselisihan Pemutusan Hubungan Kerja (Phk) Atas Kesalahan Berat, Rico Saputra Ginting Dec 2022

Penyelesaian Perselisihan Pemutusan Hubungan Kerja (Phk) Atas Kesalahan Berat, Rico Saputra Ginting

"Dharmasisya” Jurnal Program Magister Hukum FHUI

It is felt that arrangements related to settlement of relational disputes can no longer accommodate the various developments that have taken place, because the rights of individual workers/laborers have not been recognized in industrial relations disputes. The relationship between workers/laborers and employers is a relationship based on the agreement of the parties, but industrial relations disputes can be caused by termination of employment. Disputes in industrial relations can occur due to differences of opinion which result in conflicts between employers or groups of employers and workers/laborers or trade unions/labor unions due to disputes regarding rights, disputes over interests, disputes over …


Improving Employer Accountability In A World Of Private Dispute Resolution, Hope Brinn Jan 2019

Improving Employer Accountability In A World Of Private Dispute Resolution, Hope Brinn

Michigan Law Review

Private litigation is the primary enforcement mechanism for employment discrimination laws like Title VII, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and many related state statutes. But the expansion of extrajudicial dispute resolution—including both arbitration and prelitigation settlement agreements—has compromised this means of enforcement. This Note argues that state-enacted qui tam laws can revitalize the enforcement capacity of private litigation and provides a roadmap for enacting such legislation.


Social Bargaining In States And Cities: Toward A More Egalitarian And Democratic Workplace Law, Kate Andrias Sep 2017

Social Bargaining In States And Cities: Toward A More Egalitarian And Democratic Workplace Law, Kate Andrias

Articles

A well-documented problem motivates this symposium: The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) does not effectively protect workers’ rights to organize, bargain, and strike. Though unions once represented a third of American workers, today the vast majority of workers are non-union and employed “at will.” The decline of organization among workers is a key factor contributing to the rise of economic and political inequality in American society. Yet reforming labor law at the federal level—at least in a progressive direction—is currently impossible. Meanwhile, broad preemption doctrine means that states and localities are significantly limited in their ability to address the weaknesses …


Q: Since Marijuana Use Is Absolutely Prohibited Under Federal Law, Can An Employer Safely Fire An Employee Who Tests Positive For Cannabis? (A: Yes, No, Maybe, I Don't Know. Can You Repeat The Question? 1), Darrell M. Crosgrove, Michael T. Zugelder, Kimberly Nigem, Donald K. Wedding Jan 2017

Q: Since Marijuana Use Is Absolutely Prohibited Under Federal Law, Can An Employer Safely Fire An Employee Who Tests Positive For Cannabis? (A: Yes, No, Maybe, I Don't Know. Can You Repeat The Question? 1), Darrell M. Crosgrove, Michael T. Zugelder, Kimberly Nigem, Donald K. Wedding

Finance Faculty Publications

Twenty-nine states and three US territories offer medical marijuana prescriptions for their citizens, with others considering such. Some of these states make it a violation to terminate an employee for medical marijuana use. Federal laws make any marijuana possession or use a crime, and in some instances, require a drug-free workplace. Should employers enforce drug screening rules, or relax their standards and permit employees with prescriptions for medical marijuana to test positive provided work product is not affected? And can relaxing these standards be presented as a benefit to both employees that use medical marijuana, and those who do not? …


Why Whistleblowers Lose: An Empirical And Qualitative Analysis Of State Court Cases, Nancy M. Modesitt Oct 2013

Why Whistleblowers Lose: An Empirical And Qualitative Analysis Of State Court Cases, Nancy M. Modesitt

All Faculty Scholarship

This Article was originally intended to be an analysis of the propriety, or impropriety, of the doctrines most commonly used by courts to decide employees’ whistleblowing retaliation claims against employers. However, upon conducting initial research, it quickly became apparent that there was very little data available on whistleblowing cases. Unlike employment discrimination cases, where several empirical studies have been conducted, there is only one empirical analysis of whistleblower claims, which focused solely on outcomes in the federal administrative process for claims brought under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX). That study revealed that whistleblowers fare poorly for a number of reasons, but …


The Need To Prevent Employers From Accessing Private Social Network Profiles, Brett Novick Jan 2012

The Need To Prevent Employers From Accessing Private Social Network Profiles, Brett Novick

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform Caveat

In March 2012, social network privacy became a conversation topic after news reports of the story of Justin Bassett, a job applicant who withdrew his application in the middle of an interview when the interviewer asked him for the username and password of his private Facebook account. Although the issue has received much attention from the public and media, the Department of Justice (DOJ) has stated that it has no interest in prosecuting employers for asking for social networking account information. Fortunately, legislation that would make it illegal for employers to ask for the username and passwords for social networking …


The Legal Arizona Workers Act And Preemption Doctrine, Sandra J. Durkin Jan 2010

The Legal Arizona Workers Act And Preemption Doctrine, Sandra J. Durkin

Michigan Journal of Race and Law

in recent years, a spate of states passed laws regulating the employment of undocumented immigrants. This Note argues that laws that impose civil sanctions on employers that hire undocumented immigrants are preempted by both federal immigration law and federal labor law. The Note focuses specifically on the Legal Arizona Workers Act because it went into effect in 2008 and has amassed more than two years' worth of data on its enforcement, and because it is touted as the harshest state anti-immigration measure to date. This Note examines the law's impacts and argues that practitioners nationwide should challenge the Legal Arizona …


The Legal Framework For States As Employers-Of-Choice In Workplace Flexibility: A Case Study Of Arizona And Michigan, Marcy L. Karin, Gregory Fetterman, Meghan T. Mccauley, Mackenzie Deal Jan 2009

The Legal Framework For States As Employers-Of-Choice In Workplace Flexibility: A Case Study Of Arizona And Michigan, Marcy L. Karin, Gregory Fetterman, Meghan T. Mccauley, Mackenzie Deal

Journal Articles

The Legal Framework for States as Employers-of-Choice in Workplace Flexibility: A Case Study of Arizona and Michigan examines the legal frameworks Arizona and Michigan utilize for flexible work arrangements, time off, and career flexibility in their state workforce. Specifically, it provides an overview of the statutes, regulations, executive actions, and collective bargaining agreements that authorize workplace flexibility in the state workforce. After laying out this framework for both states, this paper makes several key observations: • Flexibility provides multiple benefits to states as employers, to state employees, and to the community at large. The business case for workplace flexibility is …


Fair Labor Standards Act And Sovereign Immunity: Unlocking The Courthouse Door For Texas State Employees., Melinda Herrera Jan 2001

Fair Labor Standards Act And Sovereign Immunity: Unlocking The Courthouse Door For Texas State Employees., Melinda Herrera

St. Mary's Law Journal

Unless Texas expressly waives its Eleventh Amendment sovereign immunity, its state employees will not have similar legal recourse and protection as those available to private employees. As in many other states, a party may not sue the State of Texas without its consent. Thus, in the absence of constitutional or statutory provisions to the contrary, a state may claim sovereign immunity against any suit brought by a private party in both federal and state court. As a result, the Eleventh Amendment effectively precludes private individuals from suing a state in both federal and state court for violating a federal statute …


Employment Discrimination: Recent Developments In The Supreme Court, Eileen Kaufman Jan 1995

Employment Discrimination: Recent Developments In The Supreme Court, Eileen Kaufman

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Constitutionality Of Employer-Accessible Child Abuse Registries: Due Process Implications Of Governmental Occupational Blacklisting, Michael R. Phillips Oct 1993

The Constitutionality Of Employer-Accessible Child Abuse Registries: Due Process Implications Of Governmental Occupational Blacklisting, Michael R. Phillips

Michigan Law Review

This Note discusses the due process implications of permitting employer access to state child abuse registries when disclosure affects registry members' employment.


Preemption Jan 1993

Preemption

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Model Employment Termination Act: Fairness For Employees And Employers Alike, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 1992

The Model Employment Termination Act: Fairness For Employees And Employers Alike, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

The Model Employment Termination Act (META), which state legislatures are expected to consider in the near future aims to prevent the unfair firing of Amer~ ican workers. At the same time, the Act aims to prevent devastating financial blows to American business. For both employees and employers, META offers streamlined dispute resolution procedures that would be simpler, less costly, and less time-consuming than the civil courts. The essence of the proposal is compromise-not as a matter of political expediency but as a practical, balanced accommodation of the competing worthwhile interests of employers and employees. Workers are entitled to be free …


Employment Discrimination, Charles Stephen Ralston, Paul Kamenar, William Bradford Reynolds, Gail Wright-Sirmans Jan 1989

Employment Discrimination, Charles Stephen Ralston, Paul Kamenar, William Bradford Reynolds, Gail Wright-Sirmans

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Proposal To Protect Injured Workers From Employers' Shield Of Immunity., Catherine A. Hale Jan 1989

A Proposal To Protect Injured Workers From Employers' Shield Of Immunity., Catherine A. Hale

St. Mary's Law Journal

The current workers’ compensation system shields negligent employers from liability and fails to encourage compliance with safety standards. A practical solution is to broaden the judicial definition of intentional conduct and reinstate a common-law negligence action in workers’ compensation statutes. The Texas Workers’ Compensation Act awards compensation to employees for accidental injuries sustained in the course of employment. The Act bars an employee who accepts these benefits from bringing a common-law suit for damages against the employer. The exclusive nature of the workers’ compensation remedy thus leaves employers immune from common-law negligence actions by employees who accept the plan. An …


A Seed Germinates: Unjust Discharge Reform Heads Toward Full Flower, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 1988

A Seed Germinates: Unjust Discharge Reform Heads Toward Full Flower, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

In this paper, I shall briefly review the nature and limitations of the theories most frequently invoked by the courts in dealing with wrongful dismissal. I shall then examine the major arguments for and against a general overhaul of the doctrine of employment at will. Lastly, I shall discuss some of the particular questions that will have to be addressed in fashioning a statutory solution.


Workmen's Compensation--Encouraging Employment Of The Handicapped In Michigan: A Proposal For Revision Of The Michigan Second Injury Fund, Michigan Law Review Dec 1968

Workmen's Compensation--Encouraging Employment Of The Handicapped In Michigan: A Proposal For Revision Of The Michigan Second Injury Fund, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

Employment of the handicapped is clearly a proper concern of the state. Unemployed, such a person is a burden on his family and on the state; welfare and relief payments to such a person needlessly increase costs to both the state and local governments supporting such programs. Employed, the handicapped person is a self-supporting, stable member of the community; he becomes a taxpayer rather than a tax consumer. There are also important moral and social considerations which may be simply summarized stating that no person who is able to work should be needlessly denied employment. In short, any continued waste …