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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Law

Reverse-Commandeering, Margaret Hu Dec 2012

Reverse-Commandeering, Margaret Hu

Faculty Publications

Although the anti-commandeering doctrine was developed by the Supreme Court to protect state sovereignty from federal overreach, nothing prohibits flipping the doctrine in the opposite direction to protect federal sovereignty from state overreach. Federalism preserves a balance of power between two sovereigns. Thus, the reversibility of the anticommandeering doctrine appears inherent in the reasoning offered by the Court for the doctrine’s creation and application. In this Article, I contend that reversing the anti-commandeering doctrine is appropriate in the context of contemporary immigration federalism laws. Specifically, I explore how an unconstitutional incursion into federal sovereignty can be seen in state immigration …


Your View: Top Funding Needed For Legal Assistance Corporation, Justine A. Dunlap Jan 2012

Your View: Top Funding Needed For Legal Assistance Corporation, Justine A. Dunlap

Faculty Publications

Lawyers - we love to hate them until we need one. The good news that, in certain critical situations, lawyers are available. They are a constitutional entitlement for the criminally accused. They can be retained on a contingency fee basis in certain kinds of cases. Legal services may be available through a work-based pre-paid plan. And, if you have lots of money, legal services are, of course, readily procurable. That's the stuff of legal "dream teams".


Rejecting Sovereign Immunity In Public Law Litigation, Howard M. Wasserman Jan 2012

Rejecting Sovereign Immunity In Public Law Litigation, Howard M. Wasserman

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend And Membership In The State's Political Community, Christopher L. Griffin Jr. Jan 2012

The Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend And Membership In The State's Political Community, Christopher L. Griffin Jr.

Faculty Publications

Despite decades of unmitigated administrative success, the Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend (PFD) is not immune from political and legal controversy. The symbolic and financial importance that Alaskans ascribe to their annual dividend checks has generated disputes between ordinary residents and executive agencies over eligibility. Litigation concerning three dominant status requirements - minimum residency, U.S. citizenship, and felony incarceration - reveal not only the extent to which Alaskans will pursue what they believe to be valid claims on their share of natural resource wealth, but also the limits of full political membership in the state. This Comment frames a sample of …