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Full-Text Articles in Law

Madison 1, Bush 0: Survey Testing Mr. Madison's Hypotheses, Daniel Gordon Dec 2012

Madison 1, Bush 0: Survey Testing Mr. Madison's Hypotheses, Daniel Gordon

Touro Law Review

For over fifty years, James Madison warned the American colonies and the new United States of America of the dangers of linking religion with government. Madison fought in his home state of Virginia to separate church and state and continued the fight as a congressman and as president. Between 2001 and 2009, President George W. Bush overtly linked religion with government. President Bush's efforts provide the opportunity to test President Madison's hypothesis that danger arises in American society when religion and government are linked. The Gallup Organization in its public opinion testing provides the means used in this ...


Beyond Abortion: Human Genetics And The New Eugenics, John R. Harding Jr. Nov 2012

Beyond Abortion: Human Genetics And The New Eugenics, John R. Harding Jr.

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Allocating The Costs Of Parental Free Exercise: Striking A New Balance Between Sincere Religious Belief And A Child's Right To Medical Treatment , Paul A. Monopoli Nov 2012

Allocating The Costs Of Parental Free Exercise: Striking A New Balance Between Sincere Religious Belief And A Child's Right To Medical Treatment , Paul A. Monopoli

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Assisted Suicide: A Tough Pill To Swallow, Mary Margaret Penrose Nov 2012

Assisted Suicide: A Tough Pill To Swallow, Mary Margaret Penrose

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Government's Denigration Of Religion: Is God The Victim Of Discrimination In Our Public Schools?, Michael R. O'Neill Nov 2012

Government's Denigration Of Religion: Is God The Victim Of Discrimination In Our Public Schools?, Michael R. O'Neill

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Analyzing An Experiment Gone Awry: A Unique Application Of Bacon's Corrective Model To The First Amendment Protection Of Essential Rights And Liberties, Nancy S. Williams Oct 2012

Analyzing An Experiment Gone Awry: A Unique Application Of Bacon's Corrective Model To The First Amendment Protection Of Essential Rights And Liberties, Nancy S. Williams

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


State Action And The Supreme Court's Emerging Consensus On The Line Between Establishment And Private Religious Expression, Michael W. Mcconnell Oct 2012

State Action And The Supreme Court's Emerging Consensus On The Line Between Establishment And Private Religious Expression, Michael W. Mcconnell

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Substance And Method In The Year 2000, Akhil Reed Amar Oct 2012

Substance And Method In The Year 2000, Akhil Reed Amar

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Defining Religion Down: Hasanna-Tabor, Martinez, And The U.S. Supreme Court, Carl H. Esbeck Oct 2012

Defining Religion Down: Hasanna-Tabor, Martinez, And The U.S. Supreme Court, Carl H. Esbeck

Faculty Publications

While two recent Supreme Court cases on religious freedom appear sharply at odds, in one material respect they harmonize around an understanding that religion is fully protected only when exercised in private. CLS v. Martinez involved Hastings College of Law. Hastings' regulation of extracurricular organizations was unusual in requiring that any student can join an organization. This all-comers rule had a discriminatory impact on organizations with exclusionary memberships, such as the Christian Legal Society (CLS) which required subscribing to a statement of faith and conduct. The Court acknowledged the discriminatory effect, but said that the Free Speech Clause protects speech ...


A Look At The Establishment Clause Through The Prism Of Religious Perspectives: Religious Majorities, Religious Minorities, And Nonbelievers, Samuel J. Levine Aug 2012

A Look At The Establishment Clause Through The Prism Of Religious Perspectives: Religious Majorities, Religious Minorities, And Nonbelievers, Samuel J. Levine

Samuel J. Levine

This article traces the Court’s Establishment Clause jurisprudence through several decades, examining a number of landmark cases through the prism of religious minority perspectives. In so doing, the Article aims to demonstrate the significance of religious perspectives in the development of both the doctrine and rhetoric of the Establishment Clause. The Article then turns to the current state of the Establishment Clause, expanding upon these themes through a close look at the 2004 and 2005 cases Elk Grove Unified School District v. Newdow, Van Orden v. Perry, and McCreary County v. American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky. The article ...


Religion, Government, And Law In The Contemporary United States, Daniel O. Conkle Aug 2012

Religion, Government, And Law In The Contemporary United States, Daniel O. Conkle

Articles by Maurer Faculty

In this Essay, I discuss the relationship between religion and government in the contemporary United States, addressing the period from the 1940s to the present. In so doing, I explore questions of religious liberty, including the protection of religious “free exercise” as well as the constitutional prohibition on the establishment of religion, a prohibition that sometimes - but not always - has been construed to require a “wall of separation” between church and state. I focus especially on the Supreme Court’s evolving interpretations of the First Amendment during this period, which, I suggest, were influenced by broader religious, cultural, and political ...


The Ministerial Exception And The Limits Of Religious Sovereignty, Ian C. Bartrum Jul 2012

The Ministerial Exception And The Limits Of Religious Sovereignty, Ian C. Bartrum

Ian C Bartrum

This paper explores the scope of independent religious sovereignty in the context of the ministerial exception.


The Genesis Of Rluipa And Federalism: Evaluating The Creation Of A Federal Statutory Right And Its Impact On Local Government, Patricia Salkin, Amy Lavine Jul 2012

The Genesis Of Rluipa And Federalism: Evaluating The Creation Of A Federal Statutory Right And Its Impact On Local Government, Patricia Salkin, Amy Lavine

Patricia E. Salkin

In 2000, Congress passed, and President Clinton signed, the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA), designed to provide protection from discrimination for the exercise of religion for incarcerated individuals and for those in need of various municipal permits or approvals in order to exercise their religion. With seven years of experience in the courts, this article examines the impact of RLUIPA on local governments across the country through an analysis of how the courts have been interpreting and applying statutory ambiguities and creating inconsistent doctrine in an effort to define terms and implement RLUIPA's protections. Whether an ...


Toward A Meaning-Full Establishment Clause Neutrality, Bruce Ledewitz Jun 2012

Toward A Meaning-Full Establishment Clause Neutrality, Bruce Ledewitz

Chicago-Kent Law Review

Some form of government neutrality toward religion, in contrast to a more pro-religion stance or a turn toward nonjusticiability, is the only interpretation of the Establishment Clause that can potentially lead to a national consensus concerning the proper role of religion in American public life. But to achieve that goal, neutrality theory must acknowledge and engage the need for the expressions of deep meaning on public occasions and in the public square generally. Current neutrality doctrine promotes a silent and empty public square. This article proposes an interpretation of neutrality that would allow a symbol-rich, meaning-full public square without violating ...


Lynch And The Lunacy Of Secularized Religion, Frederick Mark Gedicks Jun 2012

Lynch And The Lunacy Of Secularized Religion, Frederick Mark Gedicks

Nevada Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Future Of The Establishment Clause In Context: A Response To Ledewitz, Christopher C. Lund Jun 2012

The Future Of The Establishment Clause In Context: A Response To Ledewitz, Christopher C. Lund

Chicago-Kent Law Review

No abstract provided.


Higher Law Secularism: Religious Symbols, Contested Secularisms, And The Limits Of The Establishment Clause, Zachary R. Calo Jun 2012

Higher Law Secularism: Religious Symbols, Contested Secularisms, And The Limits Of The Establishment Clause, Zachary R. Calo

Chicago-Kent Law Review

There are two dominant traditions of understanding the secular, both with long genealogical resonance in western thought: Christian secularity and secularism. The former links the secular to a theological narrative, while the latter defines the secular as standing over and against religion. Constitutional debate has commonly framed the issue of religious symbols as demanding resolution in favor of one of these traditions. Rather than offering a way to overcome the divide and the culture war it generates, the Court's jurisprudence has instead concretized the binary. Only by cultivating a new understanding of the secular in law might there emerge ...


Court Reform And Breathing Space Under The Establishment Clause, Mark C. Rahdert Jun 2012

Court Reform And Breathing Space Under The Establishment Clause, Mark C. Rahdert

Chicago-Kent Law Review

Flast v. Cohen held that federal taxpayers have standing to challenge government spending for religion. While Frothingham v. Mellon generally prohibits taxpayer standing in federal courts, the Court reasoned that the Establishment Clause specifically prohibits taxation in any amount to fund unconstitutional religious spending. For several decades Flast has been settled law that supplied jurisdiction in many leading establishment cases. But Hein v. Freedom from Religion Foundation, Inc. and Arizona Christian School Tuition Organization v. Winn signal that Flast may soon be overruled. This jurisdictional ferment raises two questions: Why this sudden shift? And what does it signify for the ...


Are Same-Sex Marriages Really A Threat To Religious Liberty?, Eric Alan Isaacson Apr 2012

Are Same-Sex Marriages Really A Threat To Religious Liberty?, Eric Alan Isaacson

Eric Alan Isaacson

Some have contended that same-sex couples' marriages pose a grave danger to the religious liberty of social conservatives whose faith traditions do not bless same-sex unions. Those who oppose recognizing same-sex couples' right to marry have even contended that their clergy and churches might be subject to hate-crime prosecutions and loss of tax-exempt status if same-sex couples may lawfully marriage. This article seeks to answer those objections, pointing out that many limitations on religious marriages -- such as Roman Catholic doctrine barring remarriage by those who are civilly divorced -- parallel religious rules similarly limiting or withholding recognition from same-sex unions. Yet ...


A Proposal To Expand The Religious Services Exemption Under The Copyright Act, Kevin M. Lemley Apr 2012

A Proposal To Expand The Religious Services Exemption Under The Copyright Act, Kevin M. Lemley

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

This article focuses on the religious services exemption to the Copyright Act. The religious services exemption is one of many exemptions that permit certain types of use without first obtaining permission from the copyright owner, or proving fair use. This article argues that the religious services exemption should be expanded to cover any work used in the course of services as well as the recording, broadcast, and transmission of the services.

The first part of this article analyzes the existing religious services exemption under the Copyright Act to define the bounds that uses fall under the exemption. The article then ...


Religious Monopolies And The Commodification Of Religion, Shima Baradaran-Robison, Brett G. Scharffs, Elizabeth A. Sewell Mar 2012

Religious Monopolies And The Commodification Of Religion, Shima Baradaran-Robison, Brett G. Scharffs, Elizabeth A. Sewell

Pepperdine Law Review

In recent years, the number of countries in which a dominant church receives state aid and other forms of preferential treatment has increased. Dominant religions and their supporters in the former Soviet bloc and elsewhere often argue that special benefits and protection are warranted based upon the unique history and contribution of the dominant church to the identity, history, and culture of the country, and the interests of the state and its citizens. Because of the distinctive status of religion and its importance to national and cultural identity, special protection, especially against foreign and other outside influence, is deemed necessary ...


Can The Ordinary Practice Of Law Be A Religious Vocation? A Panelist's Response, Robert J. Conrad Jr Mar 2012

Can The Ordinary Practice Of Law Be A Religious Vocation? A Panelist's Response, Robert J. Conrad Jr

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Wrong Question, John E. Acuff Mar 2012

The Wrong Question, John E. Acuff

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Are Lawyers 'Wonderfully Made'?, Kenneth G. Elzinga Mar 2012

Are Lawyers 'Wonderfully Made'?, Kenneth G. Elzinga

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Pepperdine Commencement Speech, Anthony T. Kronman Mar 2012

Pepperdine Commencement Speech, Anthony T. Kronman

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Practicing Law As A Christian: Restoration Movement Perspectives, Thomas G. Bost, L. Timothy Perrin Mar 2012

Practicing Law As A Christian: Restoration Movement Perspectives, Thomas G. Bost, L. Timothy Perrin

Pepperdine Law Review

The legal profession faces a potential crisis where the professional and personal lives of practicing lawyers are being compartmentalized, with little relationship to or integration with each other, and with sometimes starkly differing standards of conduct and morality. Perrin and Bost argue that a Christian lawyer's commitment to Christ calls them to a standard of conduct higher than or different from the ethical rules propounded by the bar. The article examines the "standard vision" of lawyer conduct and ethical responsibility and summarizes four models of how Christians have adopted in relating to secular culture: in harmony with the code ...


Reflections On The Practice Of Law As A Religious Calling, From A Perspective Of Jewish Law And Ethics, Samuel J. Levine Mar 2012

Reflections On The Practice Of Law As A Religious Calling, From A Perspective Of Jewish Law And Ethics, Samuel J. Levine

Pepperdine Law Review

This Essay is based on introductory remarks Levine delivered at the inaugural conference of the Pepperdine Institute on Law, Religion, and Ethics, "Can the Ordinary Practice of Law be a Religious Calling?," held on February 6-7, 2004 at Pepperdine University School of Law. In thinking about the practice of law as a religious calling, Levine argues that we should first consider the broader issue of the general relevance of religion to various areas of life, including work. From a perspective of Jewish law and ethics, moral conduct comprises an imperative at home and at the workplace no less than at ...


A Larger Calling Still, Lee Hardy Mar 2012

A Larger Calling Still, Lee Hardy

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Clients, Courts, And Calling: Rethinking The Practice Of Law, Joseph Allegretti Mar 2012

Clients, Courts, And Calling: Rethinking The Practice Of Law, Joseph Allegretti

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Introduction: Can The Ordinary Practice Of Law Be A Religious Calling?, Robert F. Cochran Jr Mar 2012

Introduction: Can The Ordinary Practice Of Law Be A Religious Calling?, Robert F. Cochran Jr

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.