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Full-Text Articles in Law

Liberalism, Patriotism, And Cosmopolitanism In Local Citizenship In A Global Age, Eric R. Claeys Dec 2021

Liberalism, Patriotism, And Cosmopolitanism In Local Citizenship In A Global Age, Eric R. Claeys

Texas A&M Journal of Property Law

In this review Essay, I survey the most valuable lessons from Local Citizenship in a Global Age. But I have some reservations about the book, and I want to mark those off as well. The book comes off as critical of views that seek to control immigration and to establish relatively demanding criteria for noncitizens to become citizens. In my view, two factors contribute to this impression, and the book would have been more satisfying if both had been addressed.


Equality And Closure: The Paradox Of Local Citizenship, Kenneth A. Stahl Dec 2021

Equality And Closure: The Paradox Of Local Citizenship, Kenneth A. Stahl

Texas A&M Journal of Property Law

In Bourgeois Utopias, a cultural history of suburbia in America, Robert Fishman states the fundamental paradox about the suburbs: “[H]ow can a form based on the principle of exclusion include every-one?” The promise of the American suburb was that every middle-class family would be able to own a home with a yard, but this egalitarian ideal was illusory because what made the suburbs appealing was precisely what it excluded, namely everything having to do with the city—its congestion, political corruption, and most importantly, its racial diversity. And so, as suburbia was mass-produced and made avail-able with cheap low-interest loans …


Questions Of Citizenship And The Nature Of "The Public", Sarah Schindler Dec 2021

Questions Of Citizenship And The Nature Of "The Public", Sarah Schindler

Texas A&M Journal of Property Law

This essay is taken from a talk given at a symposium discussing Professor Ken Stahl’s book, Local Citizenship in a Global Age.1 It is not a traditional book review, but rather a series of musings inspired by the ideas in the book.

Professor Stahl’s new book, Local Citizenship in a Global Age, addresses a number of important issues, many of which have been the focus of my prior work: the existence of boundaries, borders, and the spaces in between; who we include in those boundaries and who we exclude; public space, private space, and the lines between them; …


Loss Of Citizenship -- Statutory Expatriation, David E. Nelson Jr. Jun 1959

Loss Of Citizenship -- Statutory Expatriation, David E. Nelson Jr.

Vanderbilt Law Review

There is no provision in the United States Constitution which expressly gives or denies Congress a right to deprive a person of, or prescribe a method whereby a person may lose, his citizenship. Yet in the Nationality Act of 1940 Congress provided for the involuntary expatriation of an American citizen upon the intentional commission of one or more of several specified acts. In 1957 three cases involving this statute reached the Supreme Court of the United States. The constitutionality of the section providing for loss of citizenship by voting in a foreign election was upheld; the one providing for loss …


Constitutional Law-Equal Protection-Validity Of State Restraints On Alien Ownership Of Land, Alfred W. Blumrosen S.Ed. May 1953

Constitutional Law-Equal Protection-Validity Of State Restraints On Alien Ownership Of Land, Alfred W. Blumrosen S.Ed.

Michigan Law Review

In the short period of five years, action on three governmental fronts has solved one problem of state legislation which seemed to violate a basic premise of the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Congress, the Supreme Court and the courts of last resort of two states have acted to destroy the effectiveness of state laws which prohibited ownership of land by aliens ineligible for citizenship. These laws incorporated whatever classification Congress established for naturalization purposes into state statutes determining rights to own land. This process has resulted in recent years in discrimination against Orientals, particularly Japanese. The purpose …


Constitutional Law -Equal Protection - California Alien Land Law, J. R. Mackenzie Apr 1948

Constitutional Law -Equal Protection - California Alien Land Law, J. R. Mackenzie

Michigan Law Review

A Japanese alien paid for some agricultural land in California which was conveyed to his seven-year-old citizen son. All records indicated that the son owned the land, although the father, his guardian, managed it. The California Alien Land Law prohibits ownership of any interest in agricultural land by aliens ineligible for citizenship. Property acquired in violation of the statute escheats as of the date of acquisition as does land transferred "with intent to prevent, evade, or avoid escheat." This intent is presumed prima facie whenever an ineligible alien pays the consideration for a transfer of land to one who may …