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Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Judicial Reforms Of 1937, Barry Cushman Mar 2020

The Judicial Reforms Of 1937, Barry Cushman

William & Mary Law Review

The literature on reform of the federal courts in 1937 understandably focuses on the history and consequences of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s ill-fated proposal to increase the membership of the Supreme Court. A series of decisions declaring various components of the New Deal unconstitutional had persuaded Roosevelt and some of his advisors that the best way out of the impasse was to enlarge the number of justiceships and to appoint to the new positions jurists who would be “dependable” supporters of the administration’s program. Yet Roosevelt and congressional Democrats also were deeply troubled by what they perceived as ...


Judicial Credibility, Bert I. Huang Mar 2020

Judicial Credibility, Bert I. Huang

William & Mary Law Review

Do people believe a federal court when it rules against the government? And does such judicial credibility depend on the perceived political affiliation of the judge? This study presents a survey experiment addressing these questions, based on a set of recent cases in which both a judge appointed by President George W. Bush and a judge appointed by President Bill Clinton declared the same Trump Administration action to be unlawful. The findings offer evidence that, in a politically salient case, the partisan identification of the judge—here, as a “Bush judge” or “Clinton judge”—can influence the credibility of judicial ...


A Brief History Of Judical Appointments From The Last 50 Years Through The Trump Administration, Donald F. Mcgahn Ii Feb 2020

A Brief History Of Judical Appointments From The Last 50 Years Through The Trump Administration, Donald F. Mcgahn Ii

William & Mary Law Review

Thank you so much for that kind introduction. I really appreciate the opportunity to be here today. I am going to talk about the confirmation process generally. There is no better place to talk about it than here. Let me begin with some numbers and statistics, before I turn to the main thrust of my talk, to give some context as to what recent Presidents have done with respect to judicial appointments. President Trump has appointed two Supreme Court Justices, Neil Gorsuch and Brett of Appeals; twenty-nine so far have been confirmed. The Senate Leader, Senator Mitch McConnell, has already ...


"When The President Does It": Why Congress Should Take The Lead In Investigations Of Executive Wrongdoing, Andrew B. Pardue Nov 2019

"When The President Does It": Why Congress Should Take The Lead In Investigations Of Executive Wrongdoing, Andrew B. Pardue

William & Mary Law Review

Asked by British journalist David Frost whether the President of the United States has the ability to authorize illegal acts when he believes such action is justified, Richard Nixon infamously replied: “Well, when the President does it, that means it is not illegal.” A majority of Americans disagreed with the former President’s assessment. But the question remains: If the President is theoretically capable of breaking the law while in office, what is the best way to determine whether a crime has actually been committed? This question has forced lawmakers to attempt to reconcile various investigatory mechanisms—all differing in ...


Why A President Cannot Authorize The Military To Violate (Most Of) The Law Of War, John C. Dehn Feb 2018

Why A President Cannot Authorize The Military To Violate (Most Of) The Law Of War, John C. Dehn

William & Mary Law Review

Waterboarding and “much worse,” torture, and “tak[ing] out” the family members of terrorists: President Trump endorsed these measures while campaigning for office. After his inauguration, Trump confirmed his view of the effectiveness of torture and has not clearly rejected other measures forbidden by international law. This Article therefore examines whether a President has the power to order or authorize the military to violate international humanitarian law, known as the “law of war.” Rather than assess whether the law of war generally constrains a President as Commander-in-Chief, however, its focus is the extent to which Congress requires the U.S ...


Much Ado About Nothing: Signing Statements, Vetoes, And Presidential Constitutional Interpretation, Keith E. Whittington Apr 2017

Much Ado About Nothing: Signing Statements, Vetoes, And Presidential Constitutional Interpretation, Keith E. Whittington

William & Mary Law Review

During the Bush presidency, presidential signing statements became briefly controversial. The controversy has faded, but the White House continues to issue statements when signing legislation. Those statements frequently point out constitutional difficulties in new statutes and sometimes warn that the executive branch will administer the statutes so as to avoid those constitutional difficulties. This Article argues that the criticisms of signing statements were mostly misguided. Signing statements as such present few problems and offer some benefits to the workings of the American political system. While there might be reason to object to the substantive constitutional positions adopted in any given ...


The Transformative Twelfth Amendment, Joshua D. Hawley Apr 2014

The Transformative Twelfth Amendment, Joshua D. Hawley

William & Mary Law Review

Scholars have long treated the Twelfth Amendment as a constitutional obscurity, a merely mechanical adjustment to the electoral college—and perhaps a less than successful one at that. This consensus is mistaken. In fact, the Twelfth Amendment accomplished one of the most consequential changes to the structure of our constitutional government yet. It fundamentally altered the nature of the Executive and the Executive’s relationship to the other branches of government. The Amendment changed the Executive into something it had not been before: a political office. The presidency designed at Philadelphia was intended to be neither a policymaking nor a ...


Partisan Conflicts Over Presidential Authority, Jide Nzelibe Nov 2011

Partisan Conflicts Over Presidential Authority, Jide Nzelibe

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.


On The Evasion Of Executive Term Limits, Tom Ginsburg, James Melton, Zachary Elkins May 2011

On The Evasion Of Executive Term Limits, Tom Ginsburg, James Melton, Zachary Elkins

William & Mary Law Review

Executive term limits are precommitments through which the polity restricts its ability to retain a popular executive down the road. But in recent years, many presidents around the world have chosen to remain in office even after their initial maximum term in office has expired. They have largely done so by amending the constitution, sometimes by replacing it entirely. The practice of revising higher law for the sake of a particular incumbent raises intriguing issues that touch ultimately on the normative justification for term limits in the first place. This Article reviews the normative debate over term limits and identifies ...


Imperial And Imperiled: The Curious State Of The Executive, Saikrishna B. Prakash Dec 2008

Imperial And Imperiled: The Curious State Of The Executive, Saikrishna B. Prakash

William & Mary Law Review

In the last four decades, the presidency has been characterized both as the "imperial presidency" as well as the "imperiled presidency. "From an originalist perspective, both camps have elements of truth on their side. When it comes to the conduct and initiation of wars, modern Presidents exercise powers that rival those the Crown possessed in England. Presidents claim the power to start wars, notwithstanding Congress's power to declare war. Moreover, Presidents insist that they have the sole right to determine how the armed forces will wage all wars, even though Congress clearly has considerable power over the armed forces ...


The Legislator-In-Chief, Vasan Kesavan, J. Gregory Sidak Oct 2002

The Legislator-In-Chief, Vasan Kesavan, J. Gregory Sidak

William & Mary Law Review

The State of the Union and Recommendation Clauses of Article II, Section 3provide that the President "shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient. "Those thirty-one words envision the President as the lead active participant in the embryonic stages of the making of laws. Eight separate principles animate the President's legislative duties and powers before the presentment process. When the State of the Union and Recommendation Clauses are seen to have this textual and analytical subtlety, they ...


Clinton, Kosovo, And The Final Destruction Of The War Powers Resolution, Geoffrey S. Corn Apr 2001

Clinton, Kosovo, And The Final Destruction Of The War Powers Resolution, Geoffrey S. Corn

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Myth Of Extraconstitutional Foreign Affairs Power, Michael D. Ramsey Oct 2000

The Myth Of Extraconstitutional Foreign Affairs Power, Michael D. Ramsey

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.


Seedtime Of An American Judiciary: From Independence To The Constitution, William F. Swindler Mar 1976

Seedtime Of An American Judiciary: From Independence To The Constitution, William F. Swindler

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.


The War Powers Resolution Revisited: Historic Accomplishment Or Surrender?, William B. Spong Jr. May 1975

The War Powers Resolution Revisited: Historic Accomplishment Or Surrender?, William B. Spong Jr.

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.


Book Review Of The Power Of The Presidency: Concepts And Controversy, Jack D. Edwards Dec 1969

Book Review Of The Power Of The Presidency: Concepts And Controversy, Jack D. Edwards

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.