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National Security Law

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2007

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Articles 1 - 30 of 31

Full-Text Articles in Law

Youngstown, Hamdan, And "Inherent" Emergency Presidential Policymaking Powers, Gordon G. Young Jul 2007

Youngstown, Hamdan, And "Inherent" Emergency Presidential Policymaking Powers, Gordon G. Young

Faculty Scholarship

This brief article explores the contribution that Hamdan v Rumsfeld may have made to clarifying what should happen in the large interstices of the rules created by the Youngstown case for determining the validity of claims of Presidential power. It offers its own view of the scope of Presidential powers in extreme emergencies involving the incapacitation of the legislative branch.


Uncharged Misconduct - The Edge Is Never Dull, David Coombs May 2007

Uncharged Misconduct - The Edge Is Never Dull, David Coombs

Other Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Passover And Jonathan Pollard, Kenneth Lasson Apr 2007

Passover And Jonathan Pollard, Kenneth Lasson

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Terrorism And Trial By Jury: The Vices And Virtues Of British And American Criminal Law, Laura K. Donohue Mar 2007

Terrorism And Trial By Jury: The Vices And Virtues Of British And American Criminal Law, Laura K. Donohue

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

British tradition and the American Constitution guarantee trial by jury for serious crime. But terrorism is not ordinary crime, and the presence of jurors may skew the manner in which terrorist trials unfold in at least three significant ways. First, organized terrorist groups may deliberately threaten jury members so the accused escapes penalty. The more ingrained the terrorist organization in the fabric of society, the greater the degree of social control exerted under the ongoing threat of violence. Second, terrorism, at heart a political challenge, may itself politicize a jury. Where nationalist conflict rages, as it does in Northern Ireland, …


When To Push The Envelope: Legal Ethics, The Rule Of Law, And National Security Strategy Legal Issues Surrounding Guantanamo Bay, Peter Margulies Feb 2007

When To Push The Envelope: Legal Ethics, The Rule Of Law, And National Security Strategy Legal Issues Surrounding Guantanamo Bay, Peter Margulies

Law Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Ten Questions: Responses Of John Cary Sims, John Cary Sims Jan 2007

Ten Questions: Responses Of John Cary Sims, John Cary Sims

McGeorge School of Law Scholarly Articles

No abstract provided.


Civil Liberties In Uncivil Times: The Perilous Quest To Preserve American Freedoms, Kenneth Lasson Jan 2007

Civil Liberties In Uncivil Times: The Perilous Quest To Preserve American Freedoms, Kenneth Lasson

All Faculty Scholarship

The perilous quest to preserve civil liberties in uncivil times is not an easy one, but the wisdom of Benjamin Franklin should remain a beacon: "Societies that trade liberty for security end often with neither." Part I of this article is a brief history of civil liberties in America during past conflicts. Part II describes various actions taken by the government to conduct the war on terrorism - including invasions of privacy, immigration policies, deportations, profiling, pre-trial detentions, and secret military tribunals. Part III analyzes the serious Constitutional questions raised by the government's actions in fighting terrorism. The thesis throughout …


When To Push The Envelope: Legal Ethics, The Rule Of Law, And National Security Strategy, Peter Margulies Jan 2007

When To Push The Envelope: Legal Ethics, The Rule Of Law, And National Security Strategy, Peter Margulies

Law Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Cost Of Confusion: Resolving Ambiguities In Detainee Treatment, Kenneth Anderson Jan 2007

The Cost Of Confusion: Resolving Ambiguities In Detainee Treatment, Kenneth Anderson

Reports

This short policy paper considers US counterterrorism policy with particular attention to treatment of detainees in matters of challenging detention, interrogation, trial of detainees, and release. It analyzes the existing US war on terror and considers future policies that would address both national security concerns and human rights/civil liberties concerns. The paper is written by two experts and advocates in counterterrorism-related issues, coming from the center right and the center left in American politics, as part of a project of the Stanley Foundation, Bridging the Foreign Policy Divide, which publishes papers by pairs of experts coming from conservative and progressive …


Immigration Reform, National Security After September 11, And The Future Of North American Integration, Kevin R. Johnson, Bernard Trujillo Jan 2007

Immigration Reform, National Security After September 11, And The Future Of North American Integration, Kevin R. Johnson, Bernard Trujillo

Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


U.S. Counterterrorism Policy And Superpower Compliance With International Human Rights Norms, Kenneth Anderson Jan 2007

U.S. Counterterrorism Policy And Superpower Compliance With International Human Rights Norms, Kenneth Anderson

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

This essay, originally prepared for a symposium on Guantanamo and international law, provides an brief overview of the elements that a comprehensive US counterterrorism should encompass. This overview is set against the question of how the US, as the world's superpower, ought to address its international law obligations. The essay then sets that question against the still-further question of what it means to be the superpower in a world that some believe is gradually evolving into a multipolar world, but which is currently a world of a conjoined US-international global system of security.

The essay defends the concept of counterterrorism …


The State Secrets Privilege And Separation Of Powers, Amanda Frost Jan 2007

The State Secrets Privilege And Separation Of Powers, Amanda Frost

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

Since September 11, 2001, the Bush administration has repeatedly invoked the state secrets privilege in cases challenging executive conduct in the war on terror, arguing that the very subject matter of these cases must be kept secret to protect national security. The executive's recent assertion of the privilege is unusual, in that it is seeking dismissal, pre-discovery, of all challenges to the legality of specific executive branch programs, rather than asking for limits on discovery in individual cases. This essay contends that the executive's assertion of the privilege is therefore akin to a claim that the courts lack jurisdiction to …


The Rule Of Law And The Military Commission, Stephen J. Ellmann Jan 2007

The Rule Of Law And The Military Commission, Stephen J. Ellmann

Articles & Chapters

This essay examines the underlying foundations of the Supreme Court's decision in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld. After laying out many of the features of the conflicting positions taken by the majority and dissents in the case, the article argues that the majority's judgment was by no means determined by the plain meaning of the statutory provisions at issue, nor even by the Steel Seizure framework of overlapping zones of executive and legislative power. Instead, three factors deserve special emphasis. The first is the Court's effort to protect, and catalyze, Congressional authority. The second is the Court's understanding of its own role …


The Big One, Edward A. Parson Jan 2007

The Big One, Edward A. Parson

Reviews

Richard Posner's Catastrophe: Risk and Response (Oxford University Press, 2004) examines four risks whose worst cases could end advanced human civilization or worse: asteroid impacts, a catastrophic chain reaction initiated in high-energy particle accelerators, global climate change, and bioterrorism. He argues that these all warrant more thought and response than they are receiving, and that they can usefully be assessed using a simple analytic framework based on cost-benefit analysis. This essay reviews knowledge of these risks and critically examines Posner's claims for a consistent analytic approach. While the conclusions that each risk merits more thought and effort appear persuasive, these …


Who's Afraid Of Geneva Law?, Aya Gruber Jan 2007

Who's Afraid Of Geneva Law?, Aya Gruber

Publications

According to many internationalists, the terrorism detention cases Hamdi v. Rumsfeld and Hamdan v. Rumsfeld are exemplary of a movement on the part of the Supreme Court toward greater incorporation of and respect for international law. Recent death penalty cases, statements of individual justices, and the increasing transnationalism of the Court's docket have lead many to believe, as Justice Ginsburg does, that the Court's "island or lone ranger mentality is beginning to change." This Article takes the contrary position that Hamdi and Hamdan are not internationalist because of their meticulous avoidance of the issue of Geneva Convention self-execution. Briefly, the …


Documents, Leaks, And The Boundaries Of Expression: Government Whistleblowing In An Over Classified Age, Susan Nevelow Mart Jan 2007

Documents, Leaks, And The Boundaries Of Expression: Government Whistleblowing In An Over Classified Age, Susan Nevelow Mart

Publications

No abstract provided.


Torture And Islamic Law, Sadiq Reza Jan 2007

Torture And Islamic Law, Sadiq Reza

Articles & Chapters

This article considers the relationship between Islamic law and the absence or practice of investigative torture in the countries of today's Muslim world. Torture is forbidden in the constitutions, statutes, and treaties of most Muslim-majority countries, but a number of these countries are regularly named among those in which torture is practiced with apparent impunity. Among these countries are several that profess a commitment to Islamic law as a source of national law, including some that identify Islamic law as the principal source of law and some that go so far as to declare themselves "Islamic states." The status of …


Domestic Surveillance And The Decline Of Legal Oversight, Fred H. Cate Jan 2007

Domestic Surveillance And The Decline Of Legal Oversight, Fred H. Cate

Articles by Maurer Faculty

JURIST Guest Columnist Fred Cate of Indiana University School of Law Bloomington says that a series of dramatic moves over the past five years - most recently the passage of the Protect America Act - has weakened statutory and judicial oversight of domestic surveillance to the point that one wonders whether, by the time the Bush Administration and Congress are finished, there is going to be any legal oversight of domestic surveillance at all.


Reply Of Professor Rudovsky To Professor Stephen I. Vladeck, "The Field Theory: Martial Law, The Suspension Power, And The Insurrection Act, David Rudovsky Jan 2007

Reply Of Professor Rudovsky To Professor Stephen I. Vladeck, "The Field Theory: Martial Law, The Suspension Power, And The Insurrection Act, David Rudovsky

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Chief Justice Rehnquist's Appointments To The Fisa Court: An Empirical Perspective, Theodore Ruger Jan 2007

Chief Justice Rehnquist's Appointments To The Fisa Court: An Empirical Perspective, Theodore Ruger

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Security And Human Rights, Liora Lazarus, Benjamin J. Goold Jan 2007

Security And Human Rights, Liora Lazarus, Benjamin J. Goold

All Faculty Publications

In the wake of the events of September 11th, the task of reconciling issues of security with a respect for fundamental human rights has emerged as one of the key challenges facing governments throughout the world. Although the issues raised by the rise of security have been the subject of considerable academic interest, to date much of the debate surrounding the impact of security on human rights has taken place within particular disciplinary confines. In contrast, this collection of essays from leading academics and practitioners in the fields of criminal justice, public law, international law, international relations and legal philosophy …


Public Protection, Proportionality, And The Search For Balance, Benjamin J. Goold, Liora Lazarus, Gabriel Swiney Jan 2007

Public Protection, Proportionality, And The Search For Balance, Benjamin J. Goold, Liora Lazarus, Gabriel Swiney

All Faculty Publications

This report examines how courts in the UK and Europe respond when human rights and security appear to conflict. It compares cases from the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Spain, and the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). It examines how rights are applied and how courts use the concept of proportionality to mediate conflicts between rights and security. The report concludes that British courts are less consistent in their application of proportionality than countries with constitutional rights protections which tend to be more rigorous in their protections of rights than are countries, like the UK, that rely instead on the …


Privacy, Identity And Security, Benjamin J. Goold Jan 2007

Privacy, Identity And Security, Benjamin J. Goold

All Faculty Publications

This paper examines the relationship between security, surveillance, privacy and identity, both in the context of legislation such as the Anti-terrorism Act and the PATRIOT Act, and also in the light of ongoing changes in how that personal information is gathered, processed and used. It is argued that prevailing notions of privacy — and the legal frameworks that aim to protect privacy interests — are ill-suited to defending individuals from an increasingly sophisticated array of surveillance and data processing techniques, which enable information to be acquired and shared at almost zero-cost and which threaten to establish the ‘categorical identity’ as …


Sending The Bureaucracy To War, Elena Baylis, David Zaring Jan 2007

Sending The Bureaucracy To War, Elena Baylis, David Zaring

Articles

Administrative law has been transformed after 9/11, much to its detriment. Since then, the government has mobilized almost every part of the civil bureaucracy to fight terrorism, including agencies that have no obvious expertise in that task. The vast majority of these bureaucratic initiatives suffer from predictable, persistent, and probably intractable problems - problems that contemporary legal scholars tend to ignore, even though they are central to the work of the writers who created and framed the discipline of administrative law.

We analyze these problems through a survey of four administrative initiatives that exemplify the project of sending bureaucrats to …


The Preventive Paradigm And The Perils Of Ad Hoc Balancing, Jules Lobel Jan 2007

The Preventive Paradigm And The Perils Of Ad Hoc Balancing, Jules Lobel

Articles

This article addresses the claim that times of crisis require jettisoning legal rules in favor of ad hoc balancing. Part I demonstrates that the coercive preventive measures adopted by the Bush administration in carrying out the War on Terror discarded clear legal rules in favor of ad hoc balancing and relied on suspicions rather than objective evidence. Part II examines the claims of prevention paradigm supporters that ad hoc balancing is necessary in the new post-911 era in order to reach decisions that correctly weigh the values of liberty and peace versus national security. This article argues that discarding the …


The Immigration-Terrorism Illusory Correlation And Heuristic Mistake, Mary De Ming Fan Jan 2007

The Immigration-Terrorism Illusory Correlation And Heuristic Mistake, Mary De Ming Fan

Articles

The national broil over immigration reform is fermenting an illusory correlation and mistaken heuristic. Two events illustrate the involvement of legislators in the manufacture and mplification of this heuristic mistake. A controversial bill passed by the House of Representatives in December 2005 explicitly and extensively packaged immigration control with antiterrorism.' During his term as a congressman, J. D. Hayworth published a book claiming that inflows of people over the U.S.-Mexico border pose a "terrorist threat," that the nation has witnessed an "illegal alien crime spree," and that high immigration rates from Mexico threaten social instability.[para] Such pronouncements by legislators generate …


The Law Of War And Its Pathologies, George P. Fletcher Jan 2007

The Law Of War And Its Pathologies, George P. Fletcher

Faculty Scholarship

War is with us more than ever. This is true despite the efforts of the United Nations Charter to ban the concept of war from the vocabulary of its member states. The preferred term is armed conflict. True, the Charter does refer to the Second World War, but apart from this concession to historically entrenched labels, the W word appears only once-when the Charter refers to ridding the world of the scourge of war. The Geneva Conventions, adopted a few years later, follow the same pattern. George Orwell could not be more amused. We change the vocabulary and think we …


The Bush Administration's Terrorist Surveillance Program And The Fourth Amendment's Warrant Requirement: Lessons From Justice Powell And The Keith Case, Tracey Maclin Jan 2007

The Bush Administration's Terrorist Surveillance Program And The Fourth Amendment's Warrant Requirement: Lessons From Justice Powell And The Keith Case, Tracey Maclin

UF Law Faculty Publications

This article was written for a symposium issue of the University of California at Davis Law Review on the fortieth anniversary of Katz v. United States. The article analyzes the Bush Administration's claim that the President has the authority to order warrant less electronic surveillance of communications between American citizens and persons abroad suspected of having connections with foreign terrorists groups. When evaluating this claim, my article focuses on a case that could be characterized as more constitutionally robust and stronger Katz. That case is United States v. United States District Court, also known as Keith. The Keith ruling held …


National Security And Environmental Laws: A Clear And Present Danger?, Hope M. Babcock Jan 2007

National Security And Environmental Laws: A Clear And Present Danger?, Hope M. Babcock

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Without question, life in the United States has changed significantly since September 11, 2001. The attacks launched from within the United States in broad daylight against non-military targets and innocent civilians, followed by the intentional dispersal of the biological agent anthrax, ushered in an era of uncertainty and fear in this country unlike any in recent memory. The visible manifestations of this fear are still with us--concrete barriers and the closing of public spaces around public buildings, heightened security at airports and train stations subjecting people to invasive searches of their persons and belongings, the sudden, seemingly random appearance of …


What’S International Law Got To Do With It? Transnational Law And The Intelligence Mission, James E. Baker Jan 2007

What’S International Law Got To Do With It? Transnational Law And The Intelligence Mission, James E. Baker

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The United States faces an immediate and continuous threat of terrorist attack using weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear weapons. The intelligence function and national security law, including international law--or more accurately transnational law--are central to addressing this threat. Indeed, international law is more relevant today in addressing this threat than it was before September 11. Part II of this article describes a continuum of contemporary threats to U.S. national security, with a focus on nonstate terrorism. Part III addresses the role of intelligence and national security law, and in particular law addressed to process, in combating these threats. Part …