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National Security Law

Series

Cornell University Law School

2016

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Data Institutionalism: A Reply To Andrew Woods, Zachary D. Clopton Jul 2016

Data Institutionalism: A Reply To Andrew Woods, Zachary D. Clopton

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

In "Against Data Exceptionalism," Andrew K. Woods explores “one of the greatest societal and technological shifts in recent years,” which manifests in the “same old” questions about government power. The global cloud is an important feature of modern technological life that has significant consequences for individual privacy, law enforcement, and governance. Yet, as Woods suggests, the legal challenges presented by the cloud have analogies in age-old puzzles of public and private international law.

Identifying these connections is a conceptual advance, and this contribution should not be understated. But, to my mind, the most telling statement in Woods’s excellent article comes …


Territoriality, Technology, And National Security, Zachary D. Clopton Jan 2016

Territoriality, Technology, And National Security, Zachary D. Clopton

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Across various contexts, parties and courts have pressed for territorial rules in cases implicating technology and national security. This Essay suggests that presumptively territorial approaches to these questions are misguided. Territorial rules do not track the division of authority or capacity among the branches, nor are they effective proxies for the important interests of regulators or regulatees. On issues of technology and national security, territorial rules seem particularly ill suited: territorial rules aspire to certainty, but technology makes it harder to define “territoriality” in a consistent and predictable way; technology weakens territoriality as a proxy for policy goals because data …