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Medical Jurisprudence

2016

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Save Thousands Of Lives Every Year: Resuscitate The Peer Review Privilege, Alan G. Williams Dec 2016

Save Thousands Of Lives Every Year: Resuscitate The Peer Review Privilege, Alan G. Williams

Journal of Law and Health

Doctors make mistakes—preventable medical mistakes—that kill or seriously injure patients. The best way to reduce these preventable errors is through a medical peer review process typically referred to as a "morbidity and mortality conference." However, over the past twenty years, federal and state courts, state legislatures, and state voters have effectively gutted the morbidity and mortality conference (M&M) as a remedial and preventative tool, resulting in tens of thousands of unnecessary deaths every year. Doctors need our help restoring the effectiveness of M&Ms. Congress has created the means to do so; now, all the courts need do is use it. …


Expansion Of Employee Wellness Programs Under Ppaca Creates Additional Barriers To Healthcare Insurance For Individuals With Disabilities, Amy B. Cheng Dec 2016

Expansion Of Employee Wellness Programs Under Ppaca Creates Additional Barriers To Healthcare Insurance For Individuals With Disabilities, Amy B. Cheng

Journal of Law and Health

There are many barriers to healthcare for the general population that has been documented throughout the years, with one particularly affected group being individuals with disabilities. One identified healthcare barrier for individuals with disabilities is the inability to gain access to the healthcare system through health insurance. While many attempts have been made to resolve this issue, serious problems have yet to be resolved. The Patient Protection Affordable Care Act (PPACA) attempted to solve the issue by expanding Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996’s (HIPAA) current regulations on employee wellness programs. The relevant regulations govern employee wellness programs …


Quintavalle: The Quandary In Bioethics, Lisa Cherkassky Dec 2016

Quintavalle: The Quandary In Bioethics, Lisa Cherkassky

Journal of Law and Health

The case of R. (Quintavalle) v. Human Fertilisation Embryology Authority (and Secretary of State for Health) presents a handful of legal problems. The biggest legal query to arise from the case is the inevitable harvest of babies, toddlers and very young children for their bone marrow. This article unpacks the judicial story behind Quintavalle to reveal how the strict provisions of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 - namely ‘suitable condition’ under schedule 2 paragraph 1(1)(a) and ‘treatment services’ and ‘assisting’ under section 2(1) - were widely misinterpreted to introduce the social selection of embryos into law. The legal …


Healer, Witness, Or Double Agent? Reexamining The Ethics Of Forensic Psychiatry, Matthew U. Scherer Dec 2016

Healer, Witness, Or Double Agent? Reexamining The Ethics Of Forensic Psychiatry, Matthew U. Scherer

Journal of Law and Health

In recent years, psychiatrists have become ever more prevalent in American courtrooms. Consequently, the issue of when the usual rules of medical ethics should apply to forensic psychiatric encounters has taken on increased importance and is a continuing topic of discussion among both legal and medical scholars. A number of approaches to the problem of forensic psychiatric ethics have been proposed, but none adequately addresses the issues that arise when a forensic encounter develops therapeutic characteristics. This article looks to the rules governing the lawyer-client relationship as a model for a new approach to forensic psychiatric ethics. This new model …


Mending Invisible Wounds: The Efficacy And Legality Of Mdma-Assisted Psychotherapy In United States' Veterans Suffering With Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Jonathan Perry Dec 2016

Mending Invisible Wounds: The Efficacy And Legality Of Mdma-Assisted Psychotherapy In United States' Veterans Suffering With Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Jonathan Perry

Journal of Law and Health

Though Veteran Affairs has provided crucial life sustaining—and often lifesaving—treatments to returning soldiers, the substantial and ever-increasing rates of veteran suicides, drug addictions, and criminal behavior indicate a need for broader options in treatment. One of the most profound discoveries uncovered through MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research is MDMA’s facilitation of the alleviation of addictive behavior in subjects, and, as a result, an alleviation of addictions in general. Addiction is one of the key symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and drug abuse plays a large role in the other afflictions suffered by veterans, namely criminal activity and a high rate of …


Human Organ Transplantation: Legal Aspects, Thomas J. Ford Dec 2016

Human Organ Transplantation: Legal Aspects, Thomas J. Ford

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Extracting Medical Injury Information From The Legal System To Improve Patient Safety In The Health System: A Social Utility Approach, Mary Chaffee Nov 2016

Extracting Medical Injury Information From The Legal System To Improve Patient Safety In The Health System: A Social Utility Approach, Mary Chaffee

University of Massachusetts Law Review

As many as 400,000 people die each year, and a million are injured, by preventable medical injuries sustained in the U.S. health system. Collection of data to enhance understanding of how unintended medical injuries happen is an essential part of harm-reduction strategies. While health system data collection and reporting processes have improved in recent years, the scope and intractability of the medical injuries problem demands new efforts. The legal system could contribute valuable medical injury data to patient safety efforts but current practices largely prevent it. In medical malpractice claims where parties settle, case information is routinely protected from disclosure …


When The State Requires Doctors To Act Against Their Conscience: The Religious Freedom Implications Of The Referral And The Direction Obligations Of Health Practitioners In Victoria And New South Wales, Michael Quinlan Oct 2016

When The State Requires Doctors To Act Against Their Conscience: The Religious Freedom Implications Of The Referral And The Direction Obligations Of Health Practitioners In Victoria And New South Wales, Michael Quinlan

BYU Law Review

No abstract provided.


Toward An International Constitution Of Patient Rights, Alison Poklaski Jul 2016

Toward An International Constitution Of Patient Rights, Alison Poklaski

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

In the past decade, medical tourism-the travel of patients across borders to receive medical treatment-has undergone unprecedented growth, fueled by the globalization of health care and related industries. While medical tourism can benefit patients through increased access to treatment and cost-savings, medical travel also raises concerns about ensuring quality of care and legal redress in medical malpractice. Moreover, existing regulations fail to address these unprecedented issues. The multilateral adoption of an International Constitution of Patient Rights (ICPR) is necessary in order to more effectively preserve medical tourism's benefits and guard against its risks.


Social & Legal Perspectives On Underuse Of Medication-Assisted Treatment For Opioid Dependence, Barbara Andraka-Christou Jul 2016

Social & Legal Perspectives On Underuse Of Medication-Assisted Treatment For Opioid Dependence, Barbara Andraka-Christou

Maurer Theses and Dissertations

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) in combination with counseling is considered the most effective treatment for opioid dependence by the World Health Organization, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and American Society of Addiction Medicine. Two MAT medications, buprenorphine and methadone, are considered essential medicines by the World Health Organization. Despite MAT’s effectiveness, it is severely underused in U.S. treatment settings, including physicians’ offices, hospitals, the Veterans Administration, residential treatment centers, prisons, and drug courts. The dissertation examines social and legal reasons for under-use of MAT in the U.S., including dominance of abstinence-only treatment methods, separation of addiction treatment from mainstream …


Use Of Facial Recognition Technology For Medical Purposes: Balancing Privacy With Innovation, Seema Mohapatra Jun 2016

Use Of Facial Recognition Technology For Medical Purposes: Balancing Privacy With Innovation, Seema Mohapatra

Pepperdine Law Review

Imagine applying for a job, and as part of your application process, your prospective employer asks for a photograph. You, as an eager candidate, comply with the request and, unbeknownst to you, the employer runs your picture through a software program that scans you for any common genetic diseases and that estimates your longevity. Alas, your face indicates that you may die young. No job for you. Although this sounds like science fiction, we may not be that far off from this scenario. In June 2014, scientists from Oxford reported that they have developed a facial recognition program that uses …


Actions Speak Louder Than Images: The Use Of Neuroscientific Evidence In Criminal Cases, Stephen J. Morse Jun 2016

Actions Speak Louder Than Images: The Use Of Neuroscientific Evidence In Criminal Cases, Stephen J. Morse

All Faculty Scholarship

This invited commentary for Journal of Law & the Biosciences considers four empirical studies previously published in the journal of the reception of neuroscientific evidence in criminal cases in the United States, Canada, England and Wales, and the Netherlands. There are conceded methodological problems with all, but the data are nonetheless instructive and suggestive. The thesis of the comment is that the courts are committing the same errors that have bedeviled the reception of psychiatric and psychological evidence. There is insufficient caution about the state of the science, and more importantly, there is insufficient understanding of the relevance of the …


Decline Of Dosage Regimen Patents In Light Of Emerging Next-Generation Dna Sequencing Technology And Possible Strategic Responses, Na An Jun 2016

Decline Of Dosage Regimen Patents In Light Of Emerging Next-Generation Dna Sequencing Technology And Possible Strategic Responses, Na An

Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology

No abstract provided.


Pregnancy Denied, Pregnancy Rejected In Stephanie Daley, Susan Ayres, Prema Manjunath May 2016

Pregnancy Denied, Pregnancy Rejected In Stephanie Daley, Susan Ayres, Prema Manjunath

Susan Ayres

This article offers a reading of Hilary Brougher’s film Stephanie Daley (2006), in which a teen is accused of murdering her newborn (neonaticide). Brougher depicts a “phenomenology of unwanted pregnancy” and an example of therapeutic jurisprudence. Part One examines Brougher’s treatment of the “shadow side of pregnancy,” and highlights barriers to the empathetic treatment of neonaticide. Part Two emphasizes the process of therapeutic jurisprudence as experienced by the two main characters. Brougher’s film provides a social narrative and phenomenology that may influence laws and legal responses and enlarge social understanding of unwanted pregnancy.


The Negative Effects Of Cumulative Abortion Regulations: Why The 5th Circuit Was Wrong In Upholding Regulations On Medication Abortions (Planned Parenthood Of Greater Texas Surgical Health Services V. Abbott), Benjamin A. Hooper May 2016

The Negative Effects Of Cumulative Abortion Regulations: Why The 5th Circuit Was Wrong In Upholding Regulations On Medication Abortions (Planned Parenthood Of Greater Texas Surgical Health Services V. Abbott), Benjamin A. Hooper

University of Cincinnati Law Review

No abstract provided.


Causation In Hepatitis B. Vaccination Litigation In France: Breaking Through Scientific Uncertainty?, Jean-Sebastien Borghetti May 2016

Causation In Hepatitis B. Vaccination Litigation In France: Breaking Through Scientific Uncertainty?, Jean-Sebastien Borghetti

Chicago-Kent Law Review

Vaccination against hepatitis B has been available since 1982 and is strongly recommended by most health professionals. In France, the hepatitis B vaccine is very widespread, but it has come under suspicion that it can cause demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Several epidemiological studies have been carried out to discover if there is indeed a connection between the hepatitis B vaccination and demyelinating diseases, but no such connection has been established so far. Many cases have nevertheless been brought before French courts, in which plaintiffs argue that they have developed a demyelinating disease due to the hepatitis B vaccination, …


Rights Gone Wrong: A Case Against Wrongful Life, W. Ryan Schuster May 2016

Rights Gone Wrong: A Case Against Wrongful Life, W. Ryan Schuster

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.


Children’S Anatomy V. Children’S Autonomy: A Precarious Balancing Act With Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis And The Creation Of “Savior Siblings”, Marley Mcclean May 2016

Children’S Anatomy V. Children’S Autonomy: A Precarious Balancing Act With Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis And The Creation Of “Savior Siblings”, Marley Mcclean

Pepperdine Law Review

On February 3, 2015, Members of the United Kingdom’s Parliament, in an historical move, voted to approve the creation of human beings from three different parents, i.e., the creation of three-person DNA. In doing so, it became the first country ever to approve laws regulating such a procedure. The procedure uses a customized version of in vitro fertilization (IVF) to mix the DNA of two parents with the healthy mitochondria of a donor woman. While three-person DNA is not yet practiced in the United States, there is a controversial ART procedure practiced and unregulated in the United States that also …


The Execution Of An Arbitration Provision As A Condition Precedent To Medical Treatment: Legally Enforceable? Medically Ethical?, Marc D. Ginsberg May 2016

The Execution Of An Arbitration Provision As A Condition Precedent To Medical Treatment: Legally Enforceable? Medically Ethical?, Marc D. Ginsberg

Marc D. Ginsberg

No abstract provided.


The Treatment For Malpractice – Physician, Enhance Thyself: The Impact Of Neuroenhancements For Medical Malpractice, Harvey L. Fiser Apr 2016

The Treatment For Malpractice – Physician, Enhance Thyself: The Impact Of Neuroenhancements For Medical Malpractice, Harvey L. Fiser

Pace Law Review

This article will introduce some of the issues and offer some possible guidelines which may eventually guide cases of medical malpractice and medical care in the face of neurointerventions. First, I will briefly address the standard of care in medical malpractice cases in general. Second, I will discuss some of the existing and potential physical and neurological enhancements available for physicians. Finally, I will explore how these neurointerventions could alter the standards for medical malpractice for both the enhanced doctors and the entire medical profession.


The Execution Of An Arbitration Provision As A Condition Precedent To Medical Treatment: Legally Enforceable? Medically Ethical, 42 Mitchell Hamline L. Rev. 273 (2016), Marc Ginsberg Apr 2016

The Execution Of An Arbitration Provision As A Condition Precedent To Medical Treatment: Legally Enforceable? Medically Ethical, 42 Mitchell Hamline L. Rev. 273 (2016), Marc Ginsberg

Marc D. Ginsberg

Is it reasonable for a physician to condition treatment upon the patient’s execution of an arbitration agreement? Is such an agreement enforceable? Is such an agreement medically ethical? This paper will address these topics (and others) in an effort to determine whether a treatment conditioned upon the execution of an arbitration agreement covering medical liability claims is consistent with, and should be a defensible component of the physician-patient relationship.


The Contours Of The Parallel Claim Exception: The Supreme Court's Opportunity To Define The Ill-Defined, Jarret Sena Apr 2016

The Contours Of The Parallel Claim Exception: The Supreme Court's Opportunity To Define The Ill-Defined, Jarret Sena

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Correctional Discharge Planning & The Missing Linkages, D'Andre D. Lampkin Apr 2016

Correctional Discharge Planning & The Missing Linkages, D'Andre D. Lampkin

D'Andre Devon Lampkin

This research project explores correctional rehabilitation and disconnects between correctional facilities and linkage to follow up mental health treatment. One of the components to releasing inmates is providing them with services that help reintroduce them into society. For the mentally ill, linkage to mental health services after spending any amount of time in a correctional facility is heavily dependent on follow through by the former inmate and the expediency and capacity of the mental health departments’ outpatient facilities within the community the former inmate is released into.


Federalism And State Marijuana Legislation, Dean M. Nickles Apr 2016

Federalism And State Marijuana Legislation, Dean M. Nickles

Notre Dame Law Review

An increasing number of states have passed legislation legalizing medical and recreational marijuana. This Note provides a survey of the language utilized by these states in their legislation and legislative materials, searching for and highlighting those purposes and intentions of the states, which implicate, explicitly or implicitly, federalism. Through this survey of mostly primary source materials, various trends and similarities among the materials will be apparent, and this Note will provide a useful resource for those trying to understand why the states may have enacted these laws.


Overtreatment And Informed Consent: A Fraud-Based Solution To Unwanted And Unnecessary Care, Isaac D. Buck Apr 2016

Overtreatment And Informed Consent: A Fraud-Based Solution To Unwanted And Unnecessary Care, Isaac D. Buck

Florida State University Law Review

According to multiple accounts, the administration of American health care results in as much as $800 billion in wasted spending due largely to the provision of overly expensive, inefficient, and unnecessary services. Beyond inflicting fiscal pain on the nation’s pocketbook, this waste has no clinical benefit—and often results in unnecessary hospital stays, cascading follow-up procedures, and time-wasting inconvenience for American patients. But aside from the mere annoyance of unnecessary care, the administration of overtreatment—that is, unnecessary care in and of itself—causes harm to the patient. Excessive care is deficient care. Unnecessary care risks potential medical error and infection, and often …


Regulating Identity: Medical Regulation As Social Control, Matt Lamkin Mar 2016

Regulating Identity: Medical Regulation As Social Control, Matt Lamkin

BYU Law Review

New biomedical technologies offer growing opportunities not only to prevent and treat illnesses, but also to change how healthy people think, feel, behave, and appear to others. Controversies over these nontherapeutic practices are a pervasive feature of contemporary American culture, from students on “study drugs” and cops on steroids to skin-lightening by black celebrities and the over-prescription of antidepressants. Yet the diversity of these controversies often masks their common root—namely, disputes about the propriety of using medical technologies as tools for shaping one’s identity.

Some observers believe these so-called “enhancement” practices threaten important values, offering unfair advantages to users and …


Placebo Patents: Creating Stronger Intellectual Property Protection For Pharmaceuticals Approved By The U.S. Food & Drug Administration, Sarah Renee Craig Mar 2016

Placebo Patents: Creating Stronger Intellectual Property Protection For Pharmaceuticals Approved By The U.S. Food & Drug Administration, Sarah Renee Craig

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


A Fair Trial: When The Constitution Requires Attorneys To Investigate Their Clients' Brains, Ellen G. Koenig Mar 2016

A Fair Trial: When The Constitution Requires Attorneys To Investigate Their Clients' Brains, Ellen G. Koenig

Fordham Urban Law Journal

The U.S. Constitution guarantees every criminal defendant the right to a fair trial. This fundamental right includes the right to a defense counsel who provides effective assistance. To be effective, attorneys must sometimes develop specific types of evidence in crafting the best defense. In recent years, the U.S. Supreme Court has found that defense attorneys did not provide effective assistance when they failed to consider neuroscience. But when must defense attorneys develop neuroscience in order to provide effective assistance? This question is difficult because the standard for determining effective assistance is still evolving. There are two leading approaches. First, in …


Avoiding Overtreatment At The End Of Life: Physician-Patient Communication And Truly Informed Consent, Barbara A. Noah, Neal R. Feigenson Jan 2016

Avoiding Overtreatment At The End Of Life: Physician-Patient Communication And Truly Informed Consent, Barbara A. Noah, Neal R. Feigenson

Faculty Scholarship

This Article considers how best to ensure that patients have the tools to make informed choices about their care as they near death. Informed decision making can help reduce excessive end-of-life care and unnecessary suffering, and result in care that aligns with patients’ well-considered values and preferences. The many factors that contribute to dying patients receiving too much therapy and life-prolonging care include: the culture of denial of death, physicians’ professional culture and attitudes toward treatment, physicians’ fear of liability, physicians’ avoidance of discussions about prognosis, and the impact of payment incentives that encourage overutilization of medical technologies.

Under the …


Retaliation And Healthcare Providers: Navigating Health And Safety Code Section 1278.5, Rick D. Barton Jan 2016

Retaliation And Healthcare Providers: Navigating Health And Safety Code Section 1278.5, Rick D. Barton

Center for Health Law Policy and Bioethics

No abstract provided.