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Litigation

2005

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Ip And Antitrust Policy: A Brief Historical Overview, Herbert J. Hovenkamp Dec 2005

Ip And Antitrust Policy: A Brief Historical Overview, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

All Faculty Scholarship

The history of IP/antitrust litigation is filled with exaggerated notions of the power conferred by IP rights and imagined threats to competition. The result is that antitrust litigation involving IP practices has seen problems where none existed. To be sure, finding the right balance between maintaining competition and creating incentives to innovate is no easy task. However, the judge in an IP/antitrust case almost never needs to do the balancing, most of which is done in the language of the IP provisions. The role of antitrust tribunals is the much more limited one of ensuring that any alleged threat to …


Explaining The American Norm Against Litigation, Shawn J. Bayern Dec 2005

Explaining The American Norm Against Litigation, Shawn J. Bayern

Scholarly Publications

In the United States, a social norm discourages people from vindicating at least some of their rights in court. However, if courts are an instrument of justice and of sound public policy-for instance, if they provide fair compensation for injured parties and efficient incentives for potential injurers-then a norm against using courts is puzzling.

This Comment explores and evaluates explanations for the norm against litigation; the Comment's goal is to provide a plausible account of the norm. As such, the Comment is largely descriptive. However, normative implications may follow from my exploration; for instance, to the extent that an explanation …


Documenting Discrimination In Voting: Judicial Findings Under Section 2 Of The Voting Rights Act Since 1982, Ellen D. Katz, Margaret Aisenbrey, Anna Baldwin, Emma Cheuse, Anna Weisbrodt Dec 2005

Documenting Discrimination In Voting: Judicial Findings Under Section 2 Of The Voting Rights Act Since 1982, Ellen D. Katz, Margaret Aisenbrey, Anna Baldwin, Emma Cheuse, Anna Weisbrodt

Other Publications

This year marks the fortieth anniversary of one of the most remarkable and consequential pieces of congressional legislation ever enacted. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 ("the VRA") targeted massive disfranchisement of African-American citizens in numerous Southern states. It imposed measures drastic in scope and extraordinary in effect. The VRA eliminated the use of literacy tests and other "devices" that Southern jurisdictions had long employed to prevent black residents from registering and voting. The VRA imposed on these jurisdictions onerous obligations to prove to federal officials that proposed changes to their electoral system would not discriminate against minority voters. Resistance …


Trial Practice And Procedure, Jason Crawford, J. Clay Fuller, Dustin T. Brown, Kate S. Cook, E. Wycliffe Orr Dec 2005

Trial Practice And Procedure, Jason Crawford, J. Clay Fuller, Dustin T. Brown, Kate S. Cook, E. Wycliffe Orr

Mercer Law Review

This survey period included significant legislative changes and yielded several interesting and important decisions to practitioners who prepare and try cases. This Article addresses judicial opinions that cover, among other topics that interest the trial practitioner, issues of damages, discovery, products liability, torts, standing, and sovereign immunity. The Article also highlights important changes in Georgia's statutory law that significantly impact trial practice.


Opting Out Of Liability: The Forthcoming, Near-Total Demise Of The Modern Class Action, Myriam Gilles Dec 2005

Opting Out Of Liability: The Forthcoming, Near-Total Demise Of The Modern Class Action, Myriam Gilles

Michigan Law Review

It is reasonable to expect that courts will demonstrate great solicitude for the recent innovation that I term "collective action waivers" - i.e., contractual provisions contained within arbitration agreements whereby consumers and others waive their rights to participate in any form of collective litigation or class arbitration. The history of mass tort class actions and the hegemonic expansion of pro-arbitration jurisprudence compel this conclusion. And, as the now-dominant economic model of contract law has moved the focus of courts from the value of consent to the value of efficiency, arbitration agreements found in all manner of shrink-wrap, scroll-text and bill-stuffer …


Detection Avoidance, Chris William Sanchirico Nov 2005

Detection Avoidance, Chris William Sanchirico

ExpressO

In practice, the problem of law enforcement is half a matter of what the government does to catch violators and half a matter of what violators do to avoid getting caught. In the theory of law enforcement, however, although the state’s efforts at "detection" play a decisive role, offenders’ efforts at "detection avoidance" are largely ignored. Always problematic, this imbalance has become critical in recent years as episodes of corporate misconduct spur new interest in punishing process crimes like obstruction of justice and perjury. This article adds detection avoidance to the existing theoretical frame with an eye toward informing the …


Good Faith In The World Of Delaware Corporate Litigation: A Strategic Perspective On Recent Developments In Fiduciary Duty Law, Zachary S. Klughaupt Nov 2005

Good Faith In The World Of Delaware Corporate Litigation: A Strategic Perspective On Recent Developments In Fiduciary Duty Law, Zachary S. Klughaupt

ExpressO

The Delaware Chancery’s new-found willingness to hold corporate directors accountable for breaching the duty of good faith has provoked widespread attention in both the business and legal communities. Legal practitioners and scholars recognize the novelty of Delaware’s recent good faith jurisprudence, as well as its potential to expose directors to gigantic personal damage awards, and in fact have published numerous articles that seek to delimit the boundaries of good faith conduct. But until now, most discussions of good faith as a fiduciary duty have approached the subject as an abstract measure of conduct, showing little regard for how a complaint …


Product Liability Law, Gary J. Spahn, Brent M. Timberlake Nov 2005

Product Liability Law, Gary J. Spahn, Brent M. Timberlake

University of Richmond Law Review

While Virginia is not typically seen as "progressive" in the field of product liability law, the Commonwealth is nonetheless a forum in which these product liability battles take place. This article summarizes selected decisions of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, federal district courts in Virginia, and courts of the Commonwealth issued between July 1, 2004 and May 15, 2005. This article also includes a discussion of the most relevant legislative changes made by the Virginia General Assembly over the same time period. While a complete analysis of every decision and statute affecting product liability is …


Respondeat Superior: Never Send To Know For Whom The Bell Tolls: It Tolls For Thee, Paul R. Tremblay, J. Charles Mokriski Oct 2005

Respondeat Superior: Never Send To Know For Whom The Bell Tolls: It Tolls For Thee, Paul R. Tremblay, J. Charles Mokriski

Paul R. Tremblay

No abstract provided.


Easing The Burden: Mediating Misdemeanor Criminal Complaints, Gabriel H. Teninbaum Oct 2005

Easing The Burden: Mediating Misdemeanor Criminal Complaints, Gabriel H. Teninbaum

ExpressO

Overburdened courts are causing critical breakdowns in the criminal justice system. However, some jurisdictions are developing creative programs to ease the burden on courts. This paper focuses on mediation programs by which courts divert criminal cases away from traditional prosecution and allow a victim-offender mediation to occur as an alternative to trials for alleged criminal acts. The new model is beginning to work: annually more than nine thousand cases are referred out of district courts by district attorneys and judges to dispute settlement centers; over seven thousand or more are resolved prior to possible court involvement, and mediation is helping …


The Best Oral Argument I (N)Ever Made, Judith S. Kaye Oct 2005

The Best Oral Argument I (N)Ever Made, Judith S. Kaye

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


Incivility And Unprofessionalism On Appeal: Impugning The Integrity Of Judges, Steven Wisotsky Oct 2005

Incivility And Unprofessionalism On Appeal: Impugning The Integrity Of Judges, Steven Wisotsky

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


What's The Difference? Comparing The Advocacy Preferences Of State And Federal Appellate Judges, David Lewis Oct 2005

What's The Difference? Comparing The Advocacy Preferences Of State And Federal Appellate Judges, David Lewis

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


Why Are So Many People Challenging Board Of Immigration Appeals Decisions In Federal Court? An Empirical Analysis Of The Recent Surge In Petitions For Review, John R.B. Palmer, Stephen W. Yale-Loehr, Elizabeth Cronin Oct 2005

Why Are So Many People Challenging Board Of Immigration Appeals Decisions In Federal Court? An Empirical Analysis Of The Recent Surge In Petitions For Review, John R.B. Palmer, Stephen W. Yale-Loehr, Elizabeth Cronin

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Changing Meaning Of Patent Claim Terms, Mark A. Lemley Oct 2005

The Changing Meaning Of Patent Claim Terms, Mark A. Lemley

Michigan Law Review

The claims of a patent are central to virtually every aspect of patent law. The claims define the scope of the invention, and their meaning therefore determines both whether a defendant's product infringes a patent and whether the patent is valid. One of the most significant aspects of patent litigation is "claim construction," the process of defining the words of the claim in other, theoretically clearer words. Courts construe the claims of the patent by starting with the plain meaning of their terms as they would be understood by a person having ordinary skill in the art, or PHOSITA. Claim …


Louisiana Appellate Practice & Procedure: An Overview For Legal Practicioners, Jonathan C. Augustine Sep 2005

Louisiana Appellate Practice & Procedure: An Overview For Legal Practicioners, Jonathan C. Augustine

Jonathan C. Augustine

Appellate practice and procedure is a specialized field. In several ways, the written and oral advocacy skills essential for success in appellate practice are very different from those used by trial court practitioners. This Article’s was written to highlight some of those differences and to recommend strategies for success in appellate practice. This Article, written by a seasoned appellate advocate and former Louisiana Supreme Court law clerk, provides a practical perspective on keys to successful appellate advocacy, using the governing rules and procedures of Louisiana’s judicial system as case study. In addition to detailing the various standards of review under …


Petition For A Writ Of Certiorari, Scott V. Johanns, No. 05-356 (U.S. Sept. 15, 2005), Scott L. Nelson, David C. Vladeck Sep 2005

Petition For A Writ Of Certiorari, Scott V. Johanns, No. 05-356 (U.S. Sept. 15, 2005), Scott L. Nelson, David C. Vladeck

U.S. Supreme Court Briefs

No abstract provided.


Driving Misjoinder: The Improper Party Problem In Removal Jurisdiction, Laura J. Hines, Steven S. Gensler Sep 2005

Driving Misjoinder: The Improper Party Problem In Removal Jurisdiction, Laura J. Hines, Steven S. Gensler

ExpressO

This Article explores, and ultimately embraces, a new exception to the complete diversity rule in removal cases: the doctrine of procedural misjoinder. We argue that the doctrine offers federal courts a vital tool with which to police joinder gamesmanship. Absent this power, plaintiffs may preclude defendant access to federal courts by the relatively simple expedient of joining in state court largely unrelated claims against or on behalf of non-diverse parties. The resulting lawsuit thus fails the complete diversity test, rendering such cases removal-proof. Like fraudulent joinder, the long-standing practice of ignoring non-diverse parties against whom no valid claim may be …


Breaking The Bank: Revisiting Central Bank Of Denver After Enron And Sarbanes-Oxley, Celia Taylor Sep 2005

Breaking The Bank: Revisiting Central Bank Of Denver After Enron And Sarbanes-Oxley, Celia Taylor

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


Making State Law In Federal Court, Benjamin C. Glassman Aug 2005

Making State Law In Federal Court, Benjamin C. Glassman

ExpressO

Abstract: We know from Erie R.R. Co. v. Tompkins that unless the Constitution or a federal statute provides the rule of decision in federal court, state law does. Contrary to the assumption of several recent commentators, however, Erie itself does not tell the federal court how to ascertain what is the law of the state, and the refrain that federal courts are to predict what the state supreme court would decide not only proves unhelpful upon examination, but also has tended to confuse the courts themselves in recent years. Yet federal courts routinely face questions of state law that admit …


Parades Of Horribles, Circles Of Hell: Ethical Dimensions Of The Publication Controversy, David S. Caudill Aug 2005

Parades Of Horribles, Circles Of Hell: Ethical Dimensions Of The Publication Controversy, David S. Caudill

Working Paper Series

This article examines the ethical dimensions of the controversy over no-citation rules and current publication practices. In the literature concerning that controversy, ethical concerns are often mentioned, but usually in tandem with other concerns. Professor Caudill isolates and categorizes the different types of ethical dilemmas, and demonstrates that at different levels of the controversy, the ethical concerns are different. He identifies three levels--the controversy over no-citation rules, the broader controversy over publication practices, and the even broader controversy over privatization of law (the so-called disappearing trial, ADR, and the end of law as we know it).


Reconceptualizing Due Process In Criminal Justice: Contributions From Law And Social Science, Christopher Slobogin Aug 2005

Reconceptualizing Due Process In Criminal Justice: Contributions From Law And Social Science, Christopher Slobogin

ExpressO

This article challenges the accepted wisdom, at least since the Supreme Court’s decision in Gault, that procedures in juvenile delinquency court should mimic the adult criminal process. The legal basis for this challenge is Gault itself, as well as the other Supreme Court cases that triggered the juvenile justice revolution of the past decades, for all of these cases relied on the due process clause, not the provisions of the Constitution that form the foundation for adult criminal procedure. That means that the central goal in juvenile justice is fundamental fairness, which does not have to be congruent with the …


Moot Court Executive Board And Teams 2005-2006, Kellie Casey Monk Aug 2005

Moot Court Executive Board And Teams 2005-2006, Kellie Casey Monk

Materials from All Student Organizations

No abstract provided.


Liability For Direct Advertising Of Drugs To Consumers: An Idea Whose Time Has Not Come, Aaron Twerski Jul 2005

Liability For Direct Advertising Of Drugs To Consumers: An Idea Whose Time Has Not Come, Aaron Twerski

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Fair Representation On Juries In The Eastern District Of Michigan: Analyzing Past Efforts And Recommending Future Action, Andrew J. Lievense Jul 2005

Fair Representation On Juries In The Eastern District Of Michigan: Analyzing Past Efforts And Recommending Future Action, Andrew J. Lievense

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

This Note builds on past recommendations to reform jury selection systems to make juries more representative of the community. Juries representing a fair cross section of the community are both a statutory and constitutional requirement, as well as a policy goal. How a judicial district designs and implements its jury selection system is important to meeting this requirement.

Part I of this Note analyzes the history and development of the representativeness interest on juries, explains how the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan attempted to meet this interest in the 1980s and 1990s, and reports and …


Pleadings In The Age Of Settlement, Michael Moffitt Jul 2005

Pleadings In The Age Of Settlement, Michael Moffitt

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Appellate Practice And Procedure, K. Todd Butler Jul 2005

Appellate Practice And Procedure, K. Todd Butler

Mercer Law Review

This Article reviews federal appellate procedure developments in the Eleventh Circuit during the 2004 calendar yea. As is the case each year, perhaps the most important procedural matter the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals considered was its own federal subject matter jurisdiction and that of the district courts in the Eleventh Circuit. If a matter is within the subject matter jurisdiction of the federal courts, or the federal appellate jurisdiction of the Eleventh Circuit, then the final order rule, along with the exceptions to the final order rule, dominate the consideration of whether a decision is subject to review. The …


Class Actions, Thomas M. Byrne, Suzanne M. Alford Jul 2005

Class Actions, Thomas M. Byrne, Suzanne M. Alford

Mercer Law Review

The year 2004 was an eventful one for the development of class action law in the Eleventh Circuit. In a series of decisions prior to 2004, the court consistently paid close attention to whether the individual issues raised by claims or defenses would predominate over any common issues and would thereby render a class action either unmanageable or unfair. For example, in Andrews v. American Telephone & Telegraph Co., the court reversed an order certifying a class of millions of telephone service customers who challenged their phone carriers' 900-number participation because of the impossibility of applying the gaming laws …


Trial Practice And Procedure, John O'Shea Sullivan, Ashby L. Kent Jul 2005

Trial Practice And Procedure, John O'Shea Sullivan, Ashby L. Kent

Mercer Law Review

The 2004 survey period yielded several noteworthy decisions relating to federal trial practice and procedure, many of which concerned issues of first impression in the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals. This Article analyzes several recent developments in the Eleventh Circuit, including significant rulings in the areas of evidence, civil procedure, statutory interpretation, jurisdiction, as well as other issues of interest to the trial practitioner.


Preventing The Subversion Of Devlin V. Scardelletti, Brian Wolfman Jun 2005

Preventing The Subversion Of Devlin V. Scardelletti, Brian Wolfman

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

In 2002, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Devlin v. Scardelletti that objecting class members could appeal a federal district court’s approval of a class settlement without first intervening in the litigation. Public interest lawyer Brian Wolfman says the ruling was a victory for both objectors and the integrity of class action procedure: Objectors, he argues, help keep fairness hearings fair.

But a number of courts are now ruling that Devlin only applies to non-opt-out class actions, rather than the much more numerous ones that give class members opt-out rights. In this article, Wolfman details the exact wording of the …