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Full-Text Articles in Law

Nazi Stolen Art: Uses And Misuses Of The Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act, Vivian Grosswald Curran Jan 2022

Nazi Stolen Art: Uses And Misuses Of The Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act, Vivian Grosswald Curran

Articles

U.S. courts in Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (“FSIA”) cases must interpret a comprehensive statute which has been said to stand or fall on its terms. At the same time, in Nazi-looted art cases, they do not ignore entirely the backdrop of the U.S.’ adoption of international principles and declarations promising to ensure the return of such art. To some extent, such an undertaking has been incorporated into a statutory amendment of the FSIA. The years 2021 and 2022 have seen major developments in the FSIA both at the U.S. Supreme Court and in the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals in …


Appraising The U.S. Supreme Court’S Philipp Decision, Vivian Grosswald Curran Jan 2021

Appraising The U.S. Supreme Court’S Philipp Decision, Vivian Grosswald Curran

Articles

This article assesses the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (FSIA) after the Supreme Court’s recent decision in Germany v. Philipp. Philipp’s rejection of a genocide exception for a foreign state’s act of property expropriation comports with the absence of such an exception in the FSIA’s text. The article also suggests that the genocide exception as it had been developing was a detrimental development in FSIA interpretation, and was also harmful to international human rights law, inasmuch as it distorted the concept of genocide. The Philipp Court’s renewed focus on the international law of property, rather than of human rights, should …


Petitioning Foreign Governments: The Act Of State And Noerr-Pennington Doctrines, Don R. Sampen Feb 2015

Petitioning Foreign Governments: The Act Of State And Noerr-Pennington Doctrines, Don R. Sampen

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Samantar And Executive Power, Peter B. Rutledge Oct 2011

Samantar And Executive Power, Peter B. Rutledge

Scholarly Works

This essay examines Samantar v. Yousuf in the context of broader debate about the relationship between federal common law and executive power. Samantar represents simply the latest effort by the Executive Branch to literally shape the meaning of law through a process referred to in the literature as “executive lawmaking.” While traditional accounts of executive lawmaking typically have treated the idea as a singular concept, Samantar demonstrates the need to bifurcate the concept into at least two different categories: acts of executive lawmaking decoupled from pending litigation and acts of executive lawmaking taken expressly in response to litigation. As Samantar …


Amending The Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act Of 1976 To Better Accommodate Non-Market Economies, J. Thomas Cristy Jan 1987

Amending The Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act Of 1976 To Better Accommodate Non-Market Economies, J. Thomas Cristy

Michigan Journal of International Law

The purpose of this Note is to demonstrate the need for an amendment to the 1976 Act, in addition to those presently under consideration, which recognizes the political and economic realities of the modem world. The following discussion focuses on the FSIA and its inability to accommodate the ideology of non-market economies in making immunity determinations. After examining the FSIA and the development of foreign sovereign immunity in general, the discussion turns to an analysis of the differences between capitalist, or free market societies, and socialist/communist, or non-market systems. Sections IV and V analyze two areas where the failure of …


The Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act And The Pursued Refugee: Lessons From Letelier V. Chile, Michael E. Tigar Jan 1982

The Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act And The Pursued Refugee: Lessons From Letelier V. Chile, Michael E. Tigar

Michigan Journal of International Law

The pursuit of refugees into countries of exile is no new phenomenon. The political tumults of mid-19th century Europe sent countless people fleeing the vengeance of victorious reactionary governments. England was a popular gathering spot, having determined that it would not extradite for political offenses. England had, to some refugee leaders, an "old-established reputation ... as the safest asylum for refugees of all parties and of all countries," despite sporadic efforts to enforce statutory authority for the expulsion of aliens whose presence was embarrassing. The exiles in London found themselves hounded by the secret police of their countries, operating apparently …