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Policies To Expand Minority Entrepreneurship: Closing Comments, Michael S. Barr Jan 2008

Policies To Expand Minority Entrepreneurship: Closing Comments, Michael S. Barr

Book Chapters

This essay is based on comments delivered at the Conference on on Entrepreneurship in Low- and Moderate-Income Communities, November 3-4, 2005. This has been a productive conversation. In my closing comments, I want to shift our focus somewhat, from entrepreneurship in low-income communities to minority entrepreneurship generally. I want to do so because many minority entrepreneurs are connected to or hire from low-income communities, and because minority entrepreneurs face critical barriers even when they attempt to create and grow firms outside of distressed communities. In this comment, I want to highlight key barriers and suggest five steps for Congress, the ...


Death And Resurrection Of Secured Credit, James J. White Jan 2004

Death And Resurrection Of Secured Credit, James J. White

Articles

The Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978 (the Code) posed palpable threats to secured creditors. It was drafted by a commission that was at least as concerned with the rights of debtors as with the rights of creditors. It was modified and adopted by a Congress that might have been the most liberal since World War II and signed into law by President Carter at the apogee of the left's power, two years before the Reagan election that marked the rise of the right and the beginning of the left's decline. The power of the left was exerted most ...


The Usury Trompe L'Oeil, James J. White Jan 2000

The Usury Trompe L'Oeil, James J. White

Articles

This Article demonstrates how the interaction of a federal statute passed in 1864,1 a case decided by the Supreme Court in 1978,2 and modem technology has legally debarred every state legislature from controlling consumer interest rates in its state-but not from passing laws that appear to do so-and has politically debarred the Congress from setting federal rates to replace the state rates. As a consequence, the elaborate usury laws on the books of most states are only a trompe l'oeil, a "visual deception... rendered in extremely fine detail ... ." The presence of these finely detailed laws gives the ...


The Recent Erosion Of The Secured Creditor's Rights Through Cases, Rules And Statutory Changes In Bankruptcy Law, James J. White Jan 1983

The Recent Erosion Of The Secured Creditor's Rights Through Cases, Rules And Statutory Changes In Bankruptcy Law, James J. White

Articles

One can view the law of creditors' rights as a series of cyclesin which alternatively the rights of the creditor and then those of the debtor are in ascendancy. Looking back through Americanlegislative history, one sees both the state legislatures and the Congress intervening on behalf of debtors in a variety of ways onmany occasions. An early example of such intervention was the enactment, particularly in the Midwest and West, of generous exemption laws that removed a variety of property beyond the reach of general creditors. A second example is the enactment of usury laws, which continue to be a ...


Bank Securities Activities And The Need To Separate Trust Departments From Large Commercial Banks, Thomas J. Schoenbaum Oct 1976

Bank Securities Activities And The Need To Separate Trust Departments From Large Commercial Banks, Thomas J. Schoenbaum

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

This article (1) analyzes the traditional Glass-Steagall Act restrictions on banks and the leading case of Investment Company Institute v. Camp, where the Supreme Court held that the offering by commercial banks of commingled agency accounts violated the Glass-Steagall Act prohibition against underwriting securities, (2) considers the. developments since that decision, and (3) offers suggestions on an approach to devising solutions to the policy questions involved.


Some Suggestions For Nonurgent Reforms In The Ucc's Treatment Of Accommodation Parties, James A. Martin Jan 1973

Some Suggestions For Nonurgent Reforms In The Ucc's Treatment Of Accommodation Parties, James A. Martin

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Anyone who has studied those provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC or Code) that deal with accommodation parties-chiefly Sections 3-415, 3-416, and 3-606-knows a certain amount of despair at trying to decipher the meaning of these provisions. Fortunately, most of the problems raised are fairly narrow, and few of them have yet posed significant problems for the courts, either because they have not yet arisen or (more often) because the courts have cut through ambiguous language to reach desirable and justifiable results. Thus, most of the problems discussed below do not cry out for immediate legislative attention. The position ...


Consumer Credit In The Ghetto: Ucc Free Entry Provisions And The Federal Trade Commission Study (Business In The Ghetto), James J. White Jan 1969

Consumer Credit In The Ghetto: Ucc Free Entry Provisions And The Federal Trade Commission Study (Business In The Ghetto), James J. White

Other Publications

Like the former speakers, I will not speak on the topic for which I was scheduled. Instead I am going to talk about two things which are not closely related to one another but which are both related to the profitability of the retail sale of goods and credit in the ghetto. I propose to leave the law on consumer credit to Mr. Dostert and Professor Hogan. First I wish to say a word on the so-called "free entry" aspects of the Uniform Consumer Credit Code; then I will comment on the Federal Trade Commission study.


Securities Exchange Act Of 1934--Cml Remedies Based Upon Illegal Extension Of Credit In Violation Of Regulation T, Robert G. Lane Mar 1963

Securities Exchange Act Of 1934--Cml Remedies Based Upon Illegal Extension Of Credit In Violation Of Regulation T, Robert G. Lane

Michigan Law Review

Following the stock market crash of 1929, there was considerable agitation for the regulation, and even the elimination, of the purchasing of securities on credit. Indeed, the extension of credit for the purchasing of securities became an issue in the 1932 presidential campaign and finally, in 1934, came under direct federal control. Although the federal regulations were intended to eliminate the hazards associated with the extension of credit for the purchasing of securities, all the available evidence indicates that the substantial amount of credit in the stock market was a significant factor in pushing up prices during the bull market ...