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Full-Text Articles in Law

Some Preliminary Statistical, Qualitative, And Anecdotal Findings Of An Empirical Study Of Collegiality Among Law Professors, Michael L. Seigel Dec 2005

Some Preliminary Statistical, Qualitative, And Anecdotal Findings Of An Empirical Study Of Collegiality Among Law Professors, Michael L. Seigel

ExpressO

This article is an empirically-based follow-up to a piece I published last year in the Journal of Legal Education entitled, On Collegiality, 54 J. Legal Educ. 406 (2004). It provides insight into the process of conducting empirical research and sets forth some preliminary – yet very intriguing – data and qualitative information gleaned from a survey responded to by more than 1200 law professors nationwide. The survey addressed a wide range of topics related to collegiality and job satisfaction in the legal-academic profession.


Readers' Expectations, Discourse Communities, And Writing Effective Bar Exam Answers, Denise D. Riebe Nov 2005

Readers' Expectations, Discourse Communities, And Writing Effective Bar Exam Answers, Denise D. Riebe

ExpressO

This article advocates that law schools should provide bar exam preparation for students, including instruction regarding effective writing for bar exams. Using the reader expectation approach and considering the unique conventions of the legal profession's discourse community as a theoretical backdrop, this article examines effective writing for bar exams. It also provides practical recommendations for instructing students to write effective bar exam answers.


Good Faith In The World Of Delaware Corporate Litigation: A Strategic Perspective On Recent Developments In Fiduciary Duty Law, Zachary S. Klughaupt Nov 2005

Good Faith In The World Of Delaware Corporate Litigation: A Strategic Perspective On Recent Developments In Fiduciary Duty Law, Zachary S. Klughaupt

ExpressO

The Delaware Chancery’s new-found willingness to hold corporate directors accountable for breaching the duty of good faith has provoked widespread attention in both the business and legal communities. Legal practitioners and scholars recognize the novelty of Delaware’s recent good faith jurisprudence, as well as its potential to expose directors to gigantic personal damage awards, and in fact have published numerous articles that seek to delimit the boundaries of good faith conduct. But until now, most discussions of good faith as a fiduciary duty have approached the subject as an abstract measure of conduct, showing little regard for how a complaint …


The Well Balanced Lawyer, Susan Daicoff Oct 2005

The Well Balanced Lawyer, Susan Daicoff

Susan Daicoff

No abstract provided.


Internationalizing U.S. Legal Education: A Report On The Education Of Transnational Lawyers, Carole Silver Oct 2005

Internationalizing U.S. Legal Education: A Report On The Education Of Transnational Lawyers, Carole Silver

ExpressO

This article analyses the role of U.S. law schools in educating foreign lawyers and the increasingly competitive global market for graduate legal education. U.S. law schools have been at the forefront of this competition, but little has been reported about their graduate programs. This article presents original research on the programs and their students, drawn from interviews with directors of graduate programs at 35 U.S. law schools, information available on law school web sites about the programs, and interviews with graduates of U.S. graduate programs. Finally, the article considers the responses of U.S. law schools to new competition from foreign …


Imputed Conflicts Of Interest In International Law Practice, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr. Oct 2005

Imputed Conflicts Of Interest In International Law Practice, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr.

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Carey Law

No abstract provided.


Organizational Form As Status And Signal, Kimberly D. Krawiec Sep 2005

Organizational Form As Status And Signal, Kimberly D. Krawiec

ExpressO

In this Article, the author analyzes the reactions of 147 New York City law firms to the 1994 enactment of the New York Limited Liability Partnership statute, which provided New York law firm partners with the first convenient mechanism to limit their personal liability for partnership debts. Using both quantitative and qualitative evidence, she evaluates whether the behavior of New York law firms supports the signaling theory of organizational form—that is, the theory that firms use the partnership form to signal to the marketplace that they provide high quality legal services, due to either superior monitoring or to profit sharing. …


Lawyers And Learning: A Metacognitive Approach To Legal Education, Anthony S. Niedwiecki Sep 2005

Lawyers And Learning: A Metacognitive Approach To Legal Education, Anthony S. Niedwiecki

ExpressO

The article discusses how the current methods of teaching law students hinder their ability to transfer the knowledge and skills learned in law school to the practice of law. I propose integrating learning theory into the law school curriculum, with a specific focus on teaching metacognitive skills. Generally, metacognition refers to having both an awareness of and control over one’s learning and thinking. Professors can help the students gain an awareness of their learning by focusing the students on which learning preferences and experiences they bring to law school and how they can match them to the skills required of …


Collaboration And Modeling: Reconsidering "Non-Directive" Orthodoxy In Clinical Legal Education, Harriet N. Katz Sep 2005

Collaboration And Modeling: Reconsidering "Non-Directive" Orthodoxy In Clinical Legal Education, Harriet N. Katz

ExpressO

Clinical legal education scholarship has primarily emphasized “nondirective” supervision of law students by lawyer supervisors, although some scholars have contended that other supervision methods may be helpful for some students and a few have contended that the method of supervision was not critical to student learning. Externship supervision provides examples of a varied repertoire of supervision methods that may be applicable to on-campus clinics as well, depending on the educational goals of the clinic. Student views of the teaching value of supervision they experienced in externship at the author’s law school support the view that collaboration and modeling, as well …


Who Are The Good Guys? The Legacy Of Watergate And The Tangled Webs We Weave, Jeffrey A. Breinholt Sep 2005

Who Are The Good Guys? The Legacy Of Watergate And The Tangled Webs We Weave, Jeffrey A. Breinholt

ExpressO

This article examines the astounding revelation that Deep Throat, the anonymous source that brought down the Nixon Presidency, was Mark Felt, the man who ran the FBI during the Watergate Scandal. Was Mark Felt a hero or a villain? Thanks to the recent publication of Bob Woodward’s The Secret Man in combination with historical case law, we now have more historical evidence about what motivated Felt and how he reacted to his own legal misfortunes. This article examines this record and shows that categorizing Felt along the hero/villain continuum is not an easy task, but argues that this type of …


Breaking The Bank: Revisiting Central Bank Of Denver After Enron And Sarbanes-Oxley, Celia Taylor Sep 2005

Breaking The Bank: Revisiting Central Bank Of Denver After Enron And Sarbanes-Oxley, Celia Taylor

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


The Lawyer As A Portfolio Manager: How Does The Fee System Influence On The Lawyer's Decision Of Handling Legal Claim?, Christian At, Nathalie Chappe Sep 2005

The Lawyer As A Portfolio Manager: How Does The Fee System Influence On The Lawyer's Decision Of Handling Legal Claim?, Christian At, Nathalie Chappe

ExpressO

We use the portfolio theory to analyze the lawyer's decision regarding the type of case the lawyer will handle. We offer some insights into the widespread idea that contingency lawyers are providing a risk sharing service. We demonstrate that a contingent fee lawyer diversifies his portfolio. We show that reputation induces more, but not fully, concentration, since a lawyer with greater reputation or expertise selects more risky cases. The size of the law firm has the same result.


Counter-Majoritarian Power And Judges' Political Speech, Michael R. Dimino Aug 2005

Counter-Majoritarian Power And Judges' Political Speech, Michael R. Dimino

ExpressO

Canons of ethics restrict judicial campaigning and prohibit sitting judges from engaging in political activity. Only recently, in Republican Party v. White, 536 U.S. 765 (2002), has the Supreme Court addressed the constitutionality of these restrictions, concluding that judicial candidates must be allowed some opportunity to discuss legal and political issues in their campaigns. But White left many questions unanswered about the permissible scope of restrictions on judges’ political activity.

This Article suggests that those questions will be answered not by applying principles of free speech, but by analyzing the opportunities the restrictions provide for independent judicial policy-making. Restrictions on …


Transnational Legal Practice Developments, Robert E. Lutz, Philip T. Von Mehren, Laurel S. Terry, Peter Ehrenhaft, Carole Silver, Clifford J. Hendel, Jonathan Goldsmith, Masahiro Shimojo Jul 2005

Transnational Legal Practice Developments, Robert E. Lutz, Philip T. Von Mehren, Laurel S. Terry, Peter Ehrenhaft, Carole Silver, Clifford J. Hendel, Jonathan Goldsmith, Masahiro Shimojo

Faculty Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Legal Scholarship As Resistance To 'Science', Steven D. Smith Jun 2005

Legal Scholarship As Resistance To 'Science', Steven D. Smith

University of San Diego Public Law and Legal Theory Research Paper Series

Why do law professors continue to produce scholarship even after achieving tenure? This essay, presented as part of a AALS panel discussing “Why We Write?”, considers some common and less common responses, and suggests that for at least a few professors, legal scholarship can serve as a way of resisting the overbearing dominance of the “scientific” worldview evident in so much modern thought in favor of a perspective more attentive to the value of persons.


The Legal Employment Market: Determinants Of Elite Firm Placement, And How Law Schools Stack Up, Anthony M. Ciolli Apr 2005

The Legal Employment Market: Determinants Of Elite Firm Placement, And How Law Schools Stack Up, Anthony M. Ciolli

ExpressO

Data collected on 15,293 law firm associates from 1295 employers who graduated from law school between 2001 and 2003 were used to develop a “total quality score” for every ABA-accredited law school, both nationally and for nine geographic regions. Quantitative methods were then used to identify factors that help explain the variation in a law school’s national career placement success at elite law firms. The findings revealed that while a law school’s academic reputation is the single biggest predictor of placement, several other factors were also highly significant. Differences in grading system, class rank disclosure policies, and the number of …


Reports Of Batson's Death Have Been Greatly Exaggerated: How The Batson Doctrine Enforces A Normative Framework Of Legal Ethics, Laura I. Appleman Mar 2005

Reports Of Batson's Death Have Been Greatly Exaggerated: How The Batson Doctrine Enforces A Normative Framework Of Legal Ethics, Laura I. Appleman

ExpressO

In this article, I aim to explain how the Batson procedure enforces a normative framework of legal ethics, a theory which I hope will be of use to both criminal law professors and scholars of legal ethics. Despite many recent prudential attacks against the Batson procedure and the peremptory challenge, I contend that Batson has a largely unarticulated ethical component, one that invokes a lawyer’s professional responsibility. Accordingly, using legal ethics as a lens through which to interpret Batson sheds new light on the doctrine. Batson’s ethical imperative affects the norms of the legal profession itself. By fostering a non-discrimination …


The Ethics Of Cause Lawyering: An Examination Of Criminal Defense Lawyers As Cause Lawyers, Margareth Etienne Mar 2005

The Ethics Of Cause Lawyering: An Examination Of Criminal Defense Lawyers As Cause Lawyers, Margareth Etienne

ExpressO

Criminal defense attorneys are often motivated by an intricate set of moral and ideological principles that belie their reputations as amoral (if not immoral) “hired guns” who would do anything to get their guilty clients off. Using empirical data from interviews with forty criminal defense attorneys I explore the motivations that inform their decisions to enter the field of criminal defense and the values that influence the manner in which they do their jobs. I conclude that many criminal defense attorneys are in fact cause lawyers who are committed to individual clients but also the “cause” of legal reform in …


Price, Path & Pride: Third-Party Closing Opinion Practice Among U.S. Lawyers (A Preliminary Investigation), Jonathan C. Lipson Mar 2005

Price, Path & Pride: Third-Party Closing Opinion Practice Among U.S. Lawyers (A Preliminary Investigation), Jonathan C. Lipson

ExpressO

This article presents the first in-depth exploration of third-party closing opinions, a common but curious – and potentially troubling -- feature of U.S. business law practice. Third-party closing opinions are letters delivered at the closing of most large transactions by the attorney for one party (e.g., the borrower) to the other party (e.g., the lender) offering limited assurance that the transaction will have legal force and effect.

Hundreds, if not thousands, of legal opinions are delivered every week. Yet, lawyers often complain that they create needless risk and cost, and produce little benefit. Closing opinions thus pose a basic question: …


Organizational Misconduct: Beyond The Principal-Agent Model, Kimberly D. Krawiec Feb 2005

Organizational Misconduct: Beyond The Principal-Agent Model, Kimberly D. Krawiec

ExpressO

This article demonstrates that, at least since the adoption of the Organizational Sentencing Guidelines in 1991, the United States legal regime has been moving away from a system of strict vicarious liability toward a system of duty-based organizational liability. Under this system, organizational liability for agent misconduct is dependant on whether or not the organization has exercised due care to avoid the harm in question, rather than under traditional agency principles of respondeat superior. Courts and agencies typically evaluate the level of care exercised by the organization by inquiring whether the organization had in place internal compliance structures ostensibly designed …


"Lawyers For Lawyers": The Emerging Role Of Law Firm Legal Counsel, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr. Jan 2005

"Lawyers For Lawyers": The Emerging Role Of Law Firm Legal Counsel, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr.

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Carey Law

No abstract provided.


Law, Ethics And Mystery, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr. Jan 2005

Law, Ethics And Mystery, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr.

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Carey Law

No abstract provided.


Women As Supreme Court Advocates, 1879-1979, Mary Clark Jan 2005

Women As Supreme Court Advocates, 1879-1979, Mary Clark

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

No abstract provided.


Arizona Bench And Bar Survey And Focus Group Results, Stephen Gerst Dec 2004

Arizona Bench And Bar Survey And Focus Group Results, Stephen Gerst

Stephen A Gerst

No abstract provided.