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Full-Text Articles in Law

Hallows Lecture: Complexity And Contradiction In American Law, Gerard E. Lynch Jan 2023

Hallows Lecture: Complexity And Contradiction In American Law, Gerard E. Lynch

Marquette Law Review

None.


The Conceptions Of Self-Evidence In The Finnis Reconstruction Of Natural Law, Kevin P. Lee Apr 2020

The Conceptions Of Self-Evidence In The Finnis Reconstruction Of Natural Law, Kevin P. Lee

St. Mary's Law Journal

Finnis claims that his theory proceeds from seven basic principles of practical reason that are self-evidently true. While much has been written about the claim of self-evidence, this article considers it in relation to the rigorous claims of logic and mathematics. It argues that when considered in this light, Finnis equivocates in his use of the concept of self-evidence between the realist Thomistic conception and a purely formal, modern symbolic conception. Given his respect for the modern positivist separation of fact and value, the realism of the Thomistic conception cannot be the foundation for the natural law as Finnis would …


The Phantom Philosophy? An Empirical Investigation Of Legal Interpretation, Jason J. Czarnezki, William K. Ford Jul 2015

The Phantom Philosophy? An Empirical Investigation Of Legal Interpretation, Jason J. Czarnezki, William K. Ford

William K. Ford

No abstract provided.


Reflections On Freedom And Criminal Responsibility In Late Twentieth Century American Legal Thought, Thomas A. Green, Merrill Catharine Hodnefield Jan 2015

Reflections On Freedom And Criminal Responsibility In Late Twentieth Century American Legal Thought, Thomas A. Green, Merrill Catharine Hodnefield

Articles

It is now a commonplace among historians that American criminal jurisprudence underwent a dramatic change something like two-thirds to three-quarters into the last century. Roughly, this development is understood as a shift (or drift) from a more-or-less pure consequentialism to a "mixed theory" wherein retributivism played a major-at times, dominant-role. As the new paradigm remains intact, now approaching a half-century, the development qualifies as a significant historical fact. The fact applies not only to the history of justification for punishment but also to conceptions of the underlying principle of (basis for) responsibility. The two are rightly distinguished: for many scholars …


The Improbability Of Positivism, Andrew Tutt Sep 2014

The Improbability Of Positivism, Andrew Tutt

Pace Law Review

Ronald Dworkin’s contributions to legal philosophy have been subject to severe criticism in recent years. Other legal philosophers call his arguments “deflected or discredited,” laced with “philosophical confusions,” and “deeply embedded” mistakes. As Brian Leiter writes, “[t]he only good news in the story about Dworkin’s impact on law and philosophy is that most of the field declined to follow the Dworkinian path . . . .”

This Article endeavors to show that, far from an effort beset with primitive errors, Dworkin’s challenge to legal positivism in the opening pages of his seminal work was neither misguided nor trivial. Rather, Dworkin’s …


Why 'Nonexistent People' Do Not Have Zero Well-Being But No Well-Being At All, Ori J. Herstein Mar 2013

Why 'Nonexistent People' Do Not Have Zero Well-Being But No Well-Being At All, Ori J. Herstein

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Some believe that the harm or benefit of existence is assessed by comparing a person’s actual state of well-being with the level of well-being they would have had had they never existed. This approach relies on ascribing a state or level of well-being to “nonexistent people,” which seems a peculiar practice: how can we attribute well-being to a “nonexistent person”? To explain away this oddity, some have argued that because no properties of well-being can be attributed to “nonexistent people” such people may be ascribed a neutral or zero level of well-being, setting the baseline for comparatively assessing the harm …


The Importance Of Comparative Law In Legal Education: United States Goals And Methods Of Legal Comparisons, Hugh J. Ault, Mary Ann Glendon Dec 2011

The Importance Of Comparative Law In Legal Education: United States Goals And Methods Of Legal Comparisons, Hugh J. Ault, Mary Ann Glendon

Hugh J. Ault

This Essay discusses the gradual changes occurring within legal education, which are finding wide acceptance in law schools throughout the United States. These changes include greater attention to other disciplines, primarily economics and behavioral sciences, and the contributions they make to a fuller understanding of the legal system. In addition, law schools are increasingly exploring the ways in which the law in textbooks may differ from the law in action. Nearly every law school, therefore, is seriously investigating the social and economic background of legal rules and their consequences through clinical legal education, which attempts to provide a real or …


The Rule Of Law As An Institutional Ideal, Gianluigi Palombella Jan 2010

The Rule Of Law As An Institutional Ideal, Gianluigi Palombella

Gianluigi Palombella

This article aims at offering an innovative interpretation of the potentialities of the "rule of law" for the XXI Century. It goes beyond current uses and the dispute between formal and substantive conceptions, by reaching the roots of the institutional ideal. Also through historical reconstruction and comparative analysis, the core of the rule of law appears to be a peculiar notion, showing a special objective that the law is asked to achieve, on a legal plane, largely independent of political instrumentalism. The normative meaning is elaborated on and construed around the notions of institutional equilibrium, non domination and "duality" of …


Ivan Rand's Ancient Constitutionalism, Jonathon Penney Jan 2010

Ivan Rand's Ancient Constitutionalism, Jonathon Penney

Articles, Book Chapters, & Popular Press

Few names loom larger than Ivan Rand’s in the history of Canadian law. If anything, Rand has retained his image as a courageous judge willing to bend the law in creative ways to seek justice and protect the rights of oppressed minorities. But Rand’s legal ideas have not faired as well. Over the years, his theory of “implied rights,” and view of the judicial role, has been criticized as incoherent and indefensible. The central aim of this paper is to challenge these criticisms. I want to offer a solution by reconstructing an overlooked component of his legal thought: a form …


The Interpretation-Construction Distinction, Lawrence B. Solum Jan 2010

The Interpretation-Construction Distinction, Lawrence B. Solum

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The interpretation-construction distinction, which marks the difference between linguistic meaning and legal effect, is much discussed these days. I shall argue that the distinction is both real and fundamental – that it marks a deep difference in two different stages (or moments) in the way that legal and political actors process legal texts. My account of the distinction will not be precisely the same as some others, but I shall argue that it is the correct account and captures the essential insights of its rivals. This Essay aims to mark the distinction clearly!

The basic idea can be explained by …


“Consolidating The New Position (1938-1940)”: A Study Of The Tenure Of Robert H. Jackson: March 5, 1938 To January 18, 1940, Nicholas John Stamato Dec 2009

“Consolidating The New Position (1938-1940)”: A Study Of The Tenure Of Robert H. Jackson: March 5, 1938 To January 18, 1940, Nicholas John Stamato

Dissertations - ALL

Robert H. Jackson’s service as Solicitor General has attained mythic status, prompting academics and commentators consistently to rate him as one of the greatest appointees to that office. In part, his stature reflects his extraordinary skill as an attorney. In some measure, Jackson’s legend draws upon the Supreme Court’s growing liberalism, which occurred upon his watch. As Peter Ubertaccio argues in his history of the office, Learned in the Law and Politics, the stature of the Solicitor General suffered during the early 1930s, when the court generally ruled against the government, then improved as the court sided with the Roosevelt …


Rights As Norms And As Ends, Gianluigi Palombella Jan 2007

Rights As Norms And As Ends, Gianluigi Palombella

Gianluigi Palombella

This article considers the narratives of law through the lens of the form-substance devide. Different legal theories have provided for opposite definitions of law, legal rules and individual rights, enhancing their identity as due to some substantive content or, on the contrary, to some formal-functional features. The form-substance antinomy reflects both institutional and theoretical reasons. It bears down on the relations envisaged among rights, norms and ends. Different conceptions of rights are best understood as a special articulation of those three terms, and offer different patterns for rights, depending on their relation-opposition with collective ends, ethical values, legislation. The following …


Reasons For Justice, Rights And Future Generations, Gianluigi Palombella Jan 2007

Reasons For Justice, Rights And Future Generations, Gianluigi Palombella

Gianluigi Palombella

This article focuses on some very "fundamental threats" to future generations' leaving, and considers whether most essential interests of future persons not to be harmed can be construed as rights, and in particular as human rights, as much as present persons'. The framework refers essentially to a conceptual grammar of justice. Moreover, it is suggested to articulate rights through the lens of "disposability" and "non-disposability" principles. Finally, the article shows the reasons for separating what we owe to future persons under the challenge of those threats for humanity, i.e. a matter of justice, from our right to hand down our …


On Hart's Ways: Law As Reason And As Fact, John M. Finnis Jan 2007

On Hart's Ways: Law As Reason And As Fact, John M. Finnis

Journal Articles

This address at the Hart Centenary Conference in Cambridge in July 2007 reflects on foundational elements in Hart's method in legal philosophy. It argues that his understanding of what it is to adopt an internal point of view was flawed by (a) inattention to the difference between descriptive history (or biography or detection) and descriptive general theory of human affairs, (b) inattention to practical reason as argument from premises, some factual but others normative (evaluative) in their content, and (c) relative inattention to the deliberations of law-makers as distinct from subjects of the law. These flaws contributed to a concept …


The Phantom Philosophy? An Empirical Investigation Of Legal Interpretation, Jason J. Czarnezki, William K. Ford Jan 2006

The Phantom Philosophy? An Empirical Investigation Of Legal Interpretation, Jason J. Czarnezki, William K. Ford

Maryland Law Review

No abstract provided.


Review Of Peter Cane, Responsibility In Law And Morality (2002), Leslie C. Griffin Jan 2003

Review Of Peter Cane, Responsibility In Law And Morality (2002), Leslie C. Griffin

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


On The Moral Foundations Of Legal Expressivism , Andrew Koppelman Jan 2001

On The Moral Foundations Of Legal Expressivism , Andrew Koppelman

Maryland Law Review

No abstract provided.


Symposium - The Expressive Dimension Of Governmental Action: Philosophical And Legal Perspectives: Introduction, Deborah Hellman Jan 2001

Symposium - The Expressive Dimension Of Governmental Action: Philosophical And Legal Perspectives: Introduction, Deborah Hellman

Maryland Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Quest To Reprogram Cultural Software: A Hermeneutical Response To Jack Balkin's Theory Of Ideology And Critique, Francis J. Mootz Iii Jan 2000

The Quest To Reprogram Cultural Software: A Hermeneutical Response To Jack Balkin's Theory Of Ideology And Critique, Francis J. Mootz Iii

Scholarly Works

Critical theory has lost the self-assurance that defined the heady days of Marxist economics and Freudian psychoanalysis. In his famous debate with Hans-Georg Gadamer thirty years ago, Jürgen Habermas argued that critical theory was a necessary corrective to the quiescence and conventionalism that followed from Gadamer's hermeneutic perspective. As the 1960s unfolded, the second generation of the Frankfurt School appeared poised to bring sophisticated techniques of social criticism to bear on the emerging postindustrialist system of global capitalism. But the promise of critical theory failed to materialize. Today, Habermas plays the role of the aging lion who refuses to accept …


Rhetoric, Pragmatism And The Interdisciplinary Turn In Legal Criticism -- A Study Of Altruistic Judicial Argument, Gene R. Shreve Jan 1998

Rhetoric, Pragmatism And The Interdisciplinary Turn In Legal Criticism -- A Study Of Altruistic Judicial Argument, Gene R. Shreve

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


A Short History Of Hearsay Reform, With Particular Reference To Hoffman V. Palmer, Eddie Morgan And Jerry Frank, Michael S. Ariens Jan 1995

A Short History Of Hearsay Reform, With Particular Reference To Hoffman V. Palmer, Eddie Morgan And Jerry Frank, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

Much of the history of the American law of evidence, including its most contentious issue, hearsay, is the story of stasis and reform. The case of Hoffman v. Palmer represents one of few cases concerning hearsay known by name, and illustrates that “false” evidence has often been used to caution against efforts proclaiming “radical reform” of the law of evidence.

In this case involving a collision between a car and a train, the critical question was: Is the defendant railroad permitted to introduce into evidence the transcript of a question and answer session made two days after the accident between …


The Law Of Evidence And The Idea Of Progress, Michael S. Ariens Jan 1992

The Law Of Evidence And The Idea Of Progress, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

To ask the question, “Does evidence law matter?,” is often to assume that some sets or groups of people believe it is important while others are challenging that view. However, another assumption regarding the nature of this question is possible—that the question is asked because legal academics believe that evidence law both does and does not matter, and that those academics also believe that these are irreconcilable beliefs. What is of particular interest is how legal academics reached this point and why they believe that evidence law both does and does not matter.

Consideration of these aspects of evidence law …


The Implicit Teaching Of Utopian Speculations: Rousseau's Contribution To The Natural Law Tradition, Thomas E. Carbonneau Jan 1979

The Implicit Teaching Of Utopian Speculations: Rousseau's Contribution To The Natural Law Tradition, Thomas E. Carbonneau

Seattle University Law Review

Legal philosophers, especially of the positivist variety, traditionally have assumed that the proponents of natural law theory present too facile an answer to the vexed question of whether an unjust law can be said to exist when it is duly sanctioned by legal and political authority. If not disappointed by the answer itself, they have been most unhappy with the explanation that accompanies it and, indeed, are prepared to challenge the very foundations of a theory of law which pays so little heed—either empirically or in terms of pure logic—to the actual operations of existing legal systems. Kant initiated the …


Integrative Jurisprudence, Jerome Hall Jan 1976

Integrative Jurisprudence, Jerome Hall

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Editorial Note: The following paper was originally presented in Mexico City on December 10, 1975, in a symposium honoring Professor Emeritus Luis Recasens Siches of the National University of Mexico.


Analytic Philosophy And Jurisprudence, Jerome Hall Jan 1966

Analytic Philosophy And Jurisprudence, Jerome Hall

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


From Legal Theory To Integrative Jurisprudence, Jerome Hall Jan 1964

From Legal Theory To Integrative Jurisprudence, Jerome Hall

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


"Is" And "Ought" In Legal Philosophy, Robert S. Summers Apr 1963

"Is" And "Ought" In Legal Philosophy, Robert S. Summers

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Gustav Radbruch, Wolfgang Friedmann Dec 1960

Gustav Radbruch, Wolfgang Friedmann

Vanderbilt Law Review

As recently as the end of the last World War the name and work of Gustav Radbruch were virtually unknown in the Anglo-American legal world. In 1938 Roscoe Pound, in his encyclopedic survey, "Fifty Years of Jurisprudence," had given a concise account of Radbruch's legal philosophy in the context of his section on "neo-idealism." In 1944 Anton Hermann Chroust wrote a penetrating analysis of Radbruch's philosophy of law, and about the same time the first edition of the present writer's Legal Theory, published on the other side of the Atlantic, included Gustav Radbruch in the survey of major legal philosophers. …


Friedrich: The Philosophy Of Law In Historical Perspective, Edgar Bodenheimer Feb 1959

Friedrich: The Philosophy Of Law In Historical Perspective, Edgar Bodenheimer

Michigan Law Review

A Review of The Philosophy of Law in Historical Perspective. By C. J. Friedrich.


Reason And Reality In Jurisprudence, Jerome Hall Jan 1958

Reason And Reality In Jurisprudence, Jerome Hall

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.