Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 26 of 26

Full-Text Articles in Law

Mirror, Mirror, On The Wall—Biased Impartiality, Appearances, And The Need For Recusal Reform, Zygmont A. Pines Oct 2020

Mirror, Mirror, On The Wall—Biased Impartiality, Appearances, And The Need For Recusal Reform, Zygmont A. Pines

Dickinson Law Review (2017-Present)

The article focuses on a troubling aspect of contemporary judicial morality.

Impartiality—and the appearance of impartiality—are the foundation of judicial decision-making, judicial morality, and the public’s trust in the rule of law. Recusal, in which a jurist voluntarily removes himself or herself from participating in a case, is a process that attempts to preserve and promote the substance and the appearance of judicial impartiality. Nevertheless, the traditional common law recusal process, prevalent in many of our state court systems, manifestly subverts basic legal and ethical norms.

Today’s recusal practice—whether rooted in unintentional hypocrisy, wishful thinking, or a pathological cognitive dissonance— …


Appellate Standards Of Review Then And Now, Yves-Marie Morissette Apr 2017

Appellate Standards Of Review Then And Now, Yves-Marie Morissette

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


The Prosser Myth Of Transferred Intent, Peter B. Kutner Jul 2016

The Prosser Myth Of Transferred Intent, Peter B. Kutner

Indiana Law Journal

The main theme of this Article is that Prosser advanced a mythical doctrine of transferred intent. What Prosser asserted to be the law was not the law when he wrote his article on transferred intent and amended his treatise. The cases he relied on to support his conclusions on transferred intent did not support them. Moreover, despite Prosser’s great influence on American tort law, Prosser’s position on transferred intent is not the law now and should not be. Its consequences are undesirable. Recognition of transferred intent as a basis of liability is due primarily to its inclusion in the First …


Americanization Of The Common Law: The Intellectual Migration Meets The Great Migration, David Thomas Konig Jun 2014

Americanization Of The Common Law: The Intellectual Migration Meets The Great Migration, David Thomas Konig

Chicago-Kent Law Review

This essay is an appreciation of William E. Nelson’s Americanization of the Common Law: The Impact of Legal Change on Massachusetts Society, 1760–1830 (1975) and the complementary study published six years later as Dispute and Conflict Resolution in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, 1725–1825 (1981). The essay places Nelson’s research project in the immediate context of historical writing on colonial New England at the time of their publication but steps back from that narrow context to identify the significance of the book in the long trajectory of great legal historical writing on the Anglo-American legal tradition.


The Unwritten Law And Its Writers, Frederick J. Moreau May 2013

The Unwritten Law And Its Writers, Frederick J. Moreau

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Restatement (Second): Its Misleading Quality And A Proposal For Its Amelioration, W. Noel Keyes Jan 2013

The Restatement (Second): Its Misleading Quality And A Proposal For Its Amelioration, W. Noel Keyes

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Restatement (Second): A Tribute To Its Increasingly Advantageous Quality, And An Encouragement To Continue The Trend, John W. Wade Jan 2013

The Restatement (Second): A Tribute To Its Increasingly Advantageous Quality, And An Encouragement To Continue The Trend, John W. Wade

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Acouple Of Generations Ahead Of Popular Demand': The First National Law Program At Mcgill University, 1918-1924, John Hobbins Apr 2008

Acouple Of Generations Ahead Of Popular Demand': The First National Law Program At Mcgill University, 1918-1924, John Hobbins

Dalhousie Law Journal

Following the First World War, Dean Robert Warden Lee introduced some radical changes to the curriculum at the McGill Law Faculty Three-year courses were instituted leading to either a civil law degree or a common law degree, and a four-year course in which both degrees could be obtained. The program was extremely controversial, running into opposition within the part-time faculty the Montreal legal community and the bar societies of several provinces. Difficulties in obtaining professional accreditation for the common law graduates led to a decline in enrollment, and the common law option was discontinued in 1926. Lee's vision of a …


The Unseen Track Of Erie Railroad: Why History And Jurisprudence Suggest A More Straightforward Form Of Erie Analysis, Donald L. Doernberg Apr 2007

The Unseen Track Of Erie Railroad: Why History And Jurisprudence Suggest A More Straightforward Form Of Erie Analysis, Donald L. Doernberg

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Why The Supreme Court Lied In Plessy, David S. Bogen Jan 2007

Why The Supreme Court Lied In Plessy, David S. Bogen

Villanova Law Review

No abstract provided.


What Appellate Judges Do, Rick Sims Oct 2005

What Appellate Judges Do, Rick Sims

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


Canadian Law Teachers In The 1930s: "When The World Was Turned Upside Down", Richard Risk Apr 2004

Canadian Law Teachers In The 1930s: "When The World Was Turned Upside Down", Richard Risk

Dalhousie Law Journal

During the 1930s. scholars in the Canadian common law schools introduced fundamental changes in ways of thinking about law, changes that made one of them. John Willis, say 'the world was turned upside down." These scholars rejected the past, especially the English legal thought of the late nineteenth century Instead, they were influenced by changes in the United States, which began early in the century, and by the emerging regulatory and welfare state. In private law subjects, Caesar Wright was central, using American ideas to challenge the dominant English authority, especially in his writing about torts. In public law subjects, …


Discrimination, The Right To Seek Redress And The Common Law: A Century-Old Debate, Béatrice Vizkelety Oct 1992

Discrimination, The Right To Seek Redress And The Common Law: A Century-Old Debate, Béatrice Vizkelety

Dalhousie Law Journal

Does discrimination law have anything in common with the common law? This question, which may have been reworded from time to time in deference to the age in which it was raised, is one which has recurred with remarkable tenacity throughout most of this century. It is also a question which continues, despite initial impressions, to be relevant to the manner in which adjudicatots interpret and apply anti-discrimination legislation today.


Faultless Reasoning: Reconstructing The Foundations Of Civil Responsibility In Quebec Since Codification, David Howes May 1991

Faultless Reasoning: Reconstructing The Foundations Of Civil Responsibility In Quebec Since Codification, David Howes

Dalhousie Law Journal

In The Civil Law System of the Province of Quebec, Jean-Gabriel Castel writes, To know the Quebec law of contract, it is sufficient to read the articles of the Civil Code dealing with this topic and the cases decided since its enactment. If in the common-law system it is absolutely necessary to know history to understand, for instance, the essential division between law and equity ... this is not the case in France or in Quebec. There, the civil law is logically organized, it is not the product of a historical evolution or of a long line of decided cases. …


The Genesis Of The Canadian Criminal Code Of 1892, Keith Jobson May 1991

The Genesis Of The Canadian Criminal Code Of 1892, Keith Jobson

Dalhousie Law Journal

Brown gives an interesting and readable account of the background of the 1892 Code and its genesis in the politics of the day. His preface and six short chapters are followed by an epilogue, a short biographical note and footnotes. Chapter One deals with the ambiguity of the term "code". Clearly, the 1892 Code was not a codification in the civilian tradition as exemplified, for example, in the Napoleonic Code, nor was it even a code such as Bentham might have drafted. It was a "code" only in the loose sense in which.the word was used by English and Canadian …


The Matrix Of The Common Law, George L. Haskins Jan 1991

The Matrix Of The Common Law, George L. Haskins

Cleveland State Law Review

Great men have admonished us never to forget the continuing relevance of history in the Anglo-American legal system. We are cautioned to remember that the highly individualistic character of much of our law is explained by its Germanic rather than its Roman roots and, further, that the Anglo-American system has built upon countervailing concepts of relationships which are feudal in origin, and to which rights and duties attach without regard to the will of individuals, which is the underlying principle of classical Roman law. Thus, in our law, powers, rights, and duties stem from relationships such as principal-agent, vendor-purchaser, landlord-tenant …


Doorkeepers: Legal Education In The Territories And Alberta, 1885-1928, Peter M. Sibenik May 1990

Doorkeepers: Legal Education In The Territories And Alberta, 1885-1928, Peter M. Sibenik

Dalhousie Law Journal

Legal education has been subjected to greater scrutiny in common law jurisdictions since the publication of Lawyers and the Courts in 1967.2 Most of the recent literature has addressed the issue of who received a legal education and became entitled to practise law. It has also examined how a conservative-minded profession regenerated itself, and whether it equipped new recruits with the proper tools to meet the challenges of a changing society.


Lord Mansfield And Negotiable Instruments, Jane D. Samson Oct 1988

Lord Mansfield And Negotiable Instruments, Jane D. Samson

Dalhousie Law Journal

In any system of judge-made law the longevity, education and character of a judge have enhanced significance. The idea of a judge personifies Justice, blinded and impartial, but the law he creates will inevitably be infused with his personality. Where an individual develops an entire system of law, his contribution to legal history can be overwhelming. Lord Mansfield remains a case in point.


The American Codification Movement, A Study Of Antebellum Legal Reform, Robert W. Gordon Mar 1983

The American Codification Movement, A Study Of Antebellum Legal Reform, Robert W. Gordon

Vanderbilt Law Review

Between 1820 and 1850 American legal commentators became obsessed with whether legislatures should codify, either in whole or in part, the common law of the American states. Indeed, "[a]lmost every law writer after 1825 felt compelled to include his views [on codification] in his works of whatever sort."" The enormous literature that emerged from this period survives today to fascinate modern legal historians, who seem to have developed their own obsession for the "codification" issue. As Lawrence Friedman has said, "The codification movement is one of the set pieces of American legal history." Charles M. Cook's "The American Codification Movement: …


Chapter Vi Penal Sanctions For Maltreatment Of Prisoners Of War, Howard S. Levie Jan 1978

Chapter Vi Penal Sanctions For Maltreatment Of Prisoners Of War, Howard S. Levie

International Law Studies

No abstract provided.


Book Reviews, Donald P. Kommers, I. C. Rand Dec 1961

Book Reviews, Donald P. Kommers, I. C. Rand

Vanderbilt Law Review

Law and Social Process in United States History:

The excellence of Law and Social Process in United States History in every respect matches the high honor accorded Professor Hurst when invited to deliver the ninth series of the Thomas M. Cooley Lectures under the sponsorship of the University of Michigan Law School. This volume, following upon the heels of his Growth of American Law and Law and the Conditions of Freedom, the latter having won the James Barr Ames prize granted quadrennially by the Harvard Law School, merely affirms his stature as an eminent legal historian. Like the earlier volumes, …


Every Day Is Law Day, Lee E. Skeel Jan 1958

Every Day Is Law Day, Lee E. Skeel

Cleveland State Law Review

President Eisenhower proclaimed May 1st of this year as "Law Day," and the day was formally observed throughout the nation. Gratifying as that was, it is hardly enough, in this or any other era, for self-satisfaction about American appreciation of our heritage of liberty under law. More important than appreciation of this priceless heritage is appreciation of the stern duty that goes along with it. Unless we daily earn this prize, we daily lose some of it. Its real strength is the revitalizing effort we add to it in our daily lives. There soon would be no precious "liberty under …


Anglo-American Legal History, Joseph A. Cox Jan 1958

Anglo-American Legal History, Joseph A. Cox

Cleveland State Law Review

In this swiftly moving age, with its revolutionary advances in so many diverse fields of activity, it is well to pause and reflect upon the Role of the Law in American life. Unfortunately, in our pre-occupation with daily chores, we miss the trees for the forest, for to a large extent the Lawyer's time is taken up with private interests which, while important to the individual, do not touch the great and vital issues affecting the community. Yet no Lawyer can have any real pride in his profession unless he has the capacity for interpreting to himself and to his …


Schwartz: The Code Napoleon And The Common Law World, J. G. Castel Jan 1957

Schwartz: The Code Napoleon And The Common Law World, J. G. Castel

Michigan Law Review

A Review of The Code Napoleon and the Common Law World. Edited by Bernard Schwartz.


Local And Special Legislation In Missouri Under The Constitution Of 1875 - Part I - Local And Special Legislation In Missouri Prior To Constitution Of 1875, Roscoe E. Harper Jun 1920

Local And Special Legislation In Missouri Under The Constitution Of 1875 - Part I - Local And Special Legislation In Missouri Prior To Constitution Of 1875, Roscoe E. Harper

University of Missouri Bulletin Law Series

During the first decade of statehood, Missouri was composed of sparsely settled, agricultural communities. Her needs were simple and her interests few. The common law adequately regulated the ordinary affairs of those pioneer days; and the general assemblies, without being overburdened, could easily satisfy all the demands for public, private, and local legislation. So the evils of special and local legislation were not prominent and aroused little, if any, protest.


Early History Of Equity, W S. Holdsworth Feb 1915

Early History Of Equity, W S. Holdsworth

Michigan Law Review

Mr W. T. BARBOUR'S Essay on the History of Contract in early English Equity, which has been published this year in Oxford Studies in Social and Legal History, is one of the most, if not the most, valuable of the contributions to English Legal History which has yet appeared in that series. Mr. BARBOUR is to be congratulated on his first appearance in a field in which the harvest, though somewhat difficult to collect, is very abundant,-- in a field in which the labourers are all too few. I think too that the Essay is important not only because it …