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Legal History

Journal

2009

Articles 1 - 30 of 45

Full-Text Articles in Law

Appeal To Heaven: On The Religious Origins Of The Constitutional Right Of Revolution, John M. Kang Dec 2009

Appeal To Heaven: On The Religious Origins Of The Constitutional Right Of Revolution, John M. Kang

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


Written And Oral Persuasion In The United States Courts: A District Judge's Perspective On Their History, Function, And Future, Mark R. Kravitz Oct 2009

Written And Oral Persuasion In The United States Courts: A District Judge's Perspective On Their History, Function, And Future, Mark R. Kravitz

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


Narratives Drawn From Rich Experience: Mayer Brown's Federal Appellate Practice, Patrick E. Higginbotham Oct 2009

Narratives Drawn From Rich Experience: Mayer Brown's Federal Appellate Practice, Patrick E. Higginbotham

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


R' Blake Brown, A Trying Question: The Jury In Nineteenth-Century Canada, Mary Stokes Oct 2009

R' Blake Brown, A Trying Question: The Jury In Nineteenth-Century Canada, Mary Stokes

Dalhousie Law Journal

In a 1984 review essay on the inter-relationship(s) oflaw and society in English criminal law historiography, Doug Hay observed that "in history, there is no 'background,"" His point was that there are an infinite number ofbackgrounds, all of which are moving and changing, often in non-linear fashion, at different paces, either in counter-point or direct dialogue with the foreground which is the immediate subject ofexposition. Legal historians who put their topics "in context" by treating the background as static are now fortunately few, at least when this background is conceived of as social or economic. But as Hay observed, the …


Examining Presidential Power Through The Rubric Of Equity, Eric A. White Oct 2009

Examining Presidential Power Through The Rubric Of Equity, Eric A. White

Michigan Law Review

In this Note I propose a method to examine presidents' actions taken outside the normal bounds of executive power by employing the general rubric of equity, in an attempt to find when the president acts with what I term "practical legitimacy." This would be a new category for executive actions that, while perhaps arguably illegal, are so valuable that we want to treat them as legitimate exercises of executive power. To do so, I first examine the history of equity, noting the many relevant parallels to our modern conception of executive power In light of these parallels, I argue that …


Fault At The Contract-Tort Interface, Roy Kreitner Jun 2009

Fault At The Contract-Tort Interface, Roy Kreitner

Michigan Law Review

The formative period in the history of contract and tort (in the second half of the nineteenth century) may be characterized by the cleavage of contract and tort around the concept of fault: tort modernized by moving from strict liability to a regime of "no liability without fault," while contract moved toward strict liability. The opposing attitudes toward fault are puzzling at first glance. Nineteenth-century scholars of private law offered explanations for the opposition, reasoning that alternative ideas about fault account for the different character of state involvement in enforcing private law rights: tort law governs liabilities imposed by law …


The Appropriations Power And Sovereign Immunity, Paul F. Figley, Jay Tidmarsh May 2009

The Appropriations Power And Sovereign Immunity, Paul F. Figley, Jay Tidmarsh

Michigan Law Review

Discussions of sovereign immunity assume that the Constitution contains no explicit text regarding sovereign immunity. As a result, arguments about the existence-or nonexistence-of sovereign immunity begin with the English and American common-law doctrines. Exploring political, fiscal, and legal developments in England and the American colonies in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, this Article shows that focusing on common-law developments is misguided. The common-law approach to sovereign immunity ended in the early 1700s. The Bankers' Case (1690- 1700), which is often regarded as the first modern common-law treatment of sovereign immunity, is in fact the last in the line of English …


Overturning The Last Stone: The Final Step In Returning Precedential Status To All Opinions, David R. Cleveland Apr 2009

Overturning The Last Stone: The Final Step In Returning Precedential Status To All Opinions, David R. Cleveland

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


"We're Your Government And We're Here To Help": Obtaining Amicus Support From The Federal Government In Supreme Court Cases, Patricia A. Millett Apr 2009

"We're Your Government And We're Here To Help": Obtaining Amicus Support From The Federal Government In Supreme Court Cases, Patricia A. Millett

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


Agents Of (Incremental) Change: From Myra Bradwell To Hillary Clinton, Gwen Hoerr Jordan Apr 2009

Agents Of (Incremental) Change: From Myra Bradwell To Hillary Clinton, Gwen Hoerr Jordan

Nevada Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Supreme Neglect Of Text And History, William Michael Treanor Apr 2009

Supreme Neglect Of Text And History, William Michael Treanor

Michigan Law Review

Since his classic book Takings appeared in 1985, Richard Epstein's ideas have profoundly shaped debate about the Fifth Amendment's Takings Clause to a degree that no other scholar can even begin to approach. His broad, original, and stunningly ambitious reading of the clause has powerfully influenced thinking in academia, in the judiciary, and in the political arena. The firestorm of controvery that followed the Supreme Court's recent decision in Kelo - in which the Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of a municipal urban renewal plan that displaced long-time homeowners and conveyed their land to developers - is in critical part …


The Detention Of Suspected Terrorists In Northern Ireland And Great Britain, Brice Dickson Mar 2009

The Detention Of Suspected Terrorists In Northern Ireland And Great Britain, Brice Dickson

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Institutional Legitimacy And Counterterrorism Trials, Gregory S. Mcneal Mar 2009

Institutional Legitimacy And Counterterrorism Trials, Gregory S. Mcneal

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Preaching To The Court House And Judging In The Temple, Nathan B. Oman Mar 2009

Preaching To The Court House And Judging In The Temple, Nathan B. Oman

BYU Law Review

No abstract provided.


"Airbrushed Out Of The Constitutional Canon": The Evolving Understanding Of Giles V. Harris, 1903-1925, Samuel Brenner Mar 2009

"Airbrushed Out Of The Constitutional Canon": The Evolving Understanding Of Giles V. Harris, 1903-1925, Samuel Brenner

Michigan Law Review

Richard H. Pildes argued in an influential 2000 article that the U.S. Supreme Court's opinion in Giles v. Harris, which was written by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, was the "one decisive turning point" in the history of "American (anti)-democracy." In Giles, Holmes rejected on questionable grounds Jackson W. Giles's challenge to the new Alabama Constitution of 1901-a document which was designed to disfranchise and had the effect of disfranchising African Americans. The decision thus contributed significantly to the development of the all-white electorate in the South, and the concomitant marginalization of southern African Americans. According to Pildes, however, the …


Andy Nuñez: His Life, Career, & Contributions, Bridgette Burbank, Jerold Widdison Jan 2009

Andy Nuñez: His Life, Career, & Contributions, Bridgette Burbank, Jerold Widdison

Water Matters!

For years and years, reaching back well before his time in the Legislature, Rep. Nuñez has been a strong advocate not only for the state’s people but for its land and water resources.


Ethics As Self-Transcendence: Legal Education, Faith, And An Ethos Of Justice, Patrick Brown Jan 2009

Ethics As Self-Transcendence: Legal Education, Faith, And An Ethos Of Justice, Patrick Brown

Seattle University Law Review

Ethics is fundamentally about ethos, attitude, one's grounded stance or existential orientation, not the extrinsicism of concepts or the formalism of rules. Ethics concerns not just any orientation, but that intimate and demanding form of personal development manifested in the experience and practice of self-transcendence. Conversely, the neglect of ethics as self-transcendence introduces deep distortions into the way we socialize students into notions of ethics and professionalism. It introduces subsequent distortions into the conditions of legal practice. It encourages a superficial and extrinsic minimalism. It encourages, in effect, the disastrous conception of legal ethics as ethical legalism. I begin by …


United States V. Hatahley: A Legal Archaeology Case Study In Law And Racial Conflict, Debora L. Threedy Jan 2009

United States V. Hatahley: A Legal Archaeology Case Study In Law And Racial Conflict, Debora L. Threedy

American Indian Law Review

This article is a case study of United States v. Hatahley using the methodology of "legal archaeology" to reconstruct the historical, social, and economic context of the litigation. In 1953, a group of individual Navajos brought suit under the Federal Tort Claims Act for the destruction of over one hundred horses and burros. The first section of the article presents two contrasting narratives for the case. The first relates what we know about the case from the reported opinions, while the second locates the litigated case within the larger social context by examining the parties, the history of incidents culminating …


International Terrorism: The Legitimization Of Safe Harbor States In International Law, Carol A. Bahan Jan 2009

International Terrorism: The Legitimization Of Safe Harbor States In International Law, Carol A. Bahan

NYLS Law Review

No abstract provided.


Changing Equalities, Jack B. Weinstein Jan 2009

Changing Equalities, Jack B. Weinstein

NYLS Law Review

No abstract provided.


Revisiting Beccaria's Vision: The Enlightenment, America's Death Penalty, And The Abolition Movement, John D. Bessler Jan 2009

Revisiting Beccaria's Vision: The Enlightenment, America's Death Penalty, And The Abolition Movement, John D. Bessler

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

In 1764, Cesare Beccaria, a 26-year-old Italian, penned . The treatise argued that state-sanctioned executions and torture violate natural law. As we near the 250th anniversary of its publication, author John D. Bessler provides a comprehensive review of the abolition movement, from before Beccaria's time to the present. Bessler reviews Beccaria's influence on Enlightenment thinkers and more importantly, on America's Founding Fathers. The Article also provides an extensive review of Eighth Amendment jurisprudence and then contrasts it with the trend in International Law towards the abolition of the death penalty. It then discusses the current state of the death penalty …


Foreword - Alinsky Conference, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. Xxv (2009), Walter J. Kendall Iii Jan 2009

Foreword - Alinsky Conference, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. Xxv (2009), Walter J. Kendall Iii

UIC Law Review

No abstract provided.


Rules, Rights And Religion: The Abyssinian Baptist Church And The Quest For Community, 1808-1810, Quinton H. Dixie Jan 2009

Rules, Rights And Religion: The Abyssinian Baptist Church And The Quest For Community, 1808-1810, Quinton H. Dixie

Seattle University Law Review

Religion, as with law, is partially about bringing together opposing narrative interpretations in order to better understand what believers feel is real. This morning I will show how narratives and their various interpretations display how communities bound by laws and morality express their understanding of who they are called to be.


Social Movements, Social Process: A Response To Gerald Rosenberg, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. 671 (2009), Laura Beth Nielsen Jan 2009

Social Movements, Social Process: A Response To Gerald Rosenberg, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. 671 (2009), Laura Beth Nielsen

UIC Law Review

No abstract provided.


Organizing In The Obama Era: A Progressive Moment Or A New Progressive Era?, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. 685 (2009), Peter Dreier Jan 2009

Organizing In The Obama Era: A Progressive Moment Or A New Progressive Era?, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. 685 (2009), Peter Dreier

UIC Law Review

No abstract provided.


Alinsky's Prescription: Democracy Alongside Law, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. 723 (2009), Barbara L. Bezdek Jan 2009

Alinsky's Prescription: Democracy Alongside Law, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. 723 (2009), Barbara L. Bezdek

UIC Law Review

No abstract provided.


Two Decades After Beech: Confusion Over The Admissibility Of Expert Opinions In Public Records, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. 925 (2009), Thomas J. Mccarthy, John M. Power Jan 2009

Two Decades After Beech: Confusion Over The Admissibility Of Expert Opinions In Public Records, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. 925 (2009), Thomas J. Mccarthy, John M. Power

UIC Law Review

No abstract provided.


Legal Theology: Law, Modernity And The Sacred, Peter Fitzpatrick Jan 2009

Legal Theology: Law, Modernity And The Sacred, Peter Fitzpatrick

Seattle University Law Review

This article argues that there is both sameness and difference as between the secular and the religious, and that law, modern law, is constituently enmeshed within this sameness and difference. That combination of sameness and difference, along with the integral part of law, is traced in a cumulation of three historicities, the first being the creation of the world's imperium, of the modern world-system, in the sixteenth century. Then, with the second historicity we have the time of revolutions, seen here as almost revolutions, of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. And finally, with the third historicity we have the time …


Jurisdiction Without Territory: From The Holy Roman Empire To The Responsibility To Protect, Anne Orford Jan 2009

Jurisdiction Without Territory: From The Holy Roman Empire To The Responsibility To Protect, Anne Orford

Michigan Journal of International Law

This Essay focuses upon one contemporary manifestation of that ongoing battle over the relationship between jurisdiction and control over territory-the emergence and institutionalization of the "responsibility to protect" concept. The idea that States and the international community have a responsibility to protect populations has shaped internationalist debates about conflict prevention, the use of force, and international administration since its development by the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty (ICISS) in 2001. The responsibility to protect concept is premised on the notion, to quote former Secretary- General Kofi Annan, that "the primary raison d'être and duty" of every State is …


The Living Constitution Of Ancient Athens: A Comparative Perspective On The Originalism Debate, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. 463 (2009), Mark J. Sundahl Jan 2009

The Living Constitution Of Ancient Athens: A Comparative Perspective On The Originalism Debate, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. 463 (2009), Mark J. Sundahl

UIC Law Review

No abstract provided.