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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Law

Inward Bound: An Exploration Of Character Development In Law School, Heather D. Baum Oct 2016

Inward Bound: An Exploration Of Character Development In Law School, Heather D. Baum

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

No abstract provided.


Appellate Division, First Department, People V. Ramirez, Nicole Compas Nov 2014

Appellate Division, First Department, People V. Ramirez, Nicole Compas

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Emotionally Intelligent Law Professor: A Lesson From The Breakfast Club, Heidi K. Brown Apr 2014

The Emotionally Intelligent Law Professor: A Lesson From The Breakfast Club, Heidi K. Brown

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

No abstract provided.


"Good Moral Character" As A Licensing Standard, Larry Craddock Apr 2013

"Good Moral Character" As A Licensing Standard, Larry Craddock

Journal of the National Association of Administrative Law Judiciary

No abstract provided.


Blaming As A Social Process: The Influence Of Character And Moral Emotion On Blame, Janice Nadler Jan 2012

Blaming As A Social Process: The Influence Of Character And Moral Emotion On Blame, Janice Nadler

Faculty Working Papers

For the most part, the law eschews the role of moral character in legal blame. But when we observe an actor who causes harm, legal and psychological blame processes are in tension. Procedures for legal blame assume an assessment of the actor's mental state, and ultimately of responsibility, that is independent of the moral character of the actor. In this paper, I present experimental evidence to suggest that perceptions of intent, foreseeability, and possibly causation can be colored by independent reasons for thinking the actor is a bad person, and are mediated by the experience of negative moral emotion. Our …


Character And Context: What Virtue Theory Can Teach Us About A Prosecutor's Ethical Duty To "Seek Justice.", R. Michael Cassidy Oct 2011

Character And Context: What Virtue Theory Can Teach Us About A Prosecutor's Ethical Duty To "Seek Justice.", R. Michael Cassidy

R. Michael Cassidy

A critical issue facing the criminal justice system today is how best to promote ethical behavior by public prosecutors. The legal profession has left much of a prosecutor’s day-to-day activity unregulated, in favor of a general, catch-all admonition to “seek justice.” In this article the author argues that professional norms are truly functional only if those working with a given ethical framework recognize the system’s implicit dependence on character. A code of professional conduct in which this dependence is not recognized is both contentless and corrupting. Building on the ethics of Aristotle and modern philosophers Alasdair MacIntyre and Bernard Williams, …


What I Think That I Have Learned About Legal Ethics, Richard H. Underwood Jan 2003

What I Think That I Have Learned About Legal Ethics, Richard H. Underwood

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

In this short piece I want to say a few things that other academics teaching legal ethics may find disturbing. I say this because I believe that I may be swimming against the current academic fashion. Of course, it is possible that I do not have a very good handle on the current academic fashion. I hope I am not setting up a straw person to knock down, but I may be. If I am, I am sure someone will call me to task. What I am going to say is this: contrary to popular belief (among practitioners, at least) …


The Chicago Conspiracy Trial: Character And Judicial Discretion, Pnina Lahav Jan 2000

The Chicago Conspiracy Trial: Character And Judicial Discretion, Pnina Lahav

Faculty Scholarship

On October 29, 1969, sometime after two o'clock in the afternoon, following yet another heated exchange with defendant Bobby Seale in a courtroom full of spectators, reporters, and armed guards, Judge Julius Jennings Hoffman turned to a marshal and ordered: "Take that defendant into the room in there and deal with him as he should be dealt with in this circumstance."' Judge Hoffman described the aftermath:

In an attempt to maintain order in the courtroom, the Court thereupon ordered the defendant Seale removed from the courtroom at which time he was forcibly restrained by binding and gagging. The defendant Seale …


Constitutional Law - Due Process - Denial Of Admission To The Bar Based On Unwarranted Inferences Of Bad Moral Character, Jerome B. Libin Jan 1958

Constitutional Law - Due Process - Denial Of Admission To The Bar Based On Unwarranted Inferences Of Bad Moral Character, Jerome B. Libin

Michigan Law Review

Power over admission to the bar has long been vested in the judiciary of each state. While the legislature may prescribe certain standards, the state court alone is responsible for the determination of those qualified for the practice of law within its jurisdiction. The application of these standards often demands the exercise of meticulous judgment by the court in reaching its conclusion as to an applicant's fitness. Where, on the evidence or lack of evidence presented, the court finds that it cannot in good conscience grant its approval, the candidate is denied admission. To the extent that such a denial …