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Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility

Seattle University School of Law

Seattle University Law Review

Professional responsibility

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Law

Race Bias And The Importance Of Consciousness For Criminal Defense Attorneys, Andrea D. Lyon Apr 2011

Race Bias And The Importance Of Consciousness For Criminal Defense Attorneys, Andrea D. Lyon

Seattle University Law Review

This Article will begin with a discussion of race bias and will examine who in the criminal justice system has such biases. These concepts will provide a backdrop to the next Part, where I will turn to an analysis about the need for criminal defense lawyers to be conscious of race bias. I focus on two specific circumstances in which awareness of one’s own racial bias is imperative: interacting with clients and voir dire. But first, we must come to an understanding about the nature of race bias itself.


Rethinking Attorney Liens: Why Washington Attorneys Are Forced Into "Involuntary" Pro Bono, Zach Elsner Jan 2004

Rethinking Attorney Liens: Why Washington Attorneys Are Forced Into "Involuntary" Pro Bono, Zach Elsner

Seattle University Law Review

After a brief discussion of the history of the attorney lien in Part II, Part III discusses the basic rules governing the attorney lien in Washington. Part IV of this Comment discusses the various limitations on attorney liens and how those limitations have discouraged use or encouraged misuse of the statute. Part IV begins with a discussion of general professional responsibility concerns and continues with withdrawal and termination as they relate to attorney liens. Part IV concludes the Comment with a discussion of the inconsistencies of the retaining lien and a discussion of the various limitations on the charging liens.


Legal Ethics And A Civil Action, Kevin E. Mohr Jan 1999

Legal Ethics And A Civil Action, Kevin E. Mohr

Seattle University Law Review

This Article shows how A Civil Action can be used to supplement a course in Professional Responsibility. A Civil Action contains many events that can similarly be used to introduce students to ethical dilemmas they will confront when they enter the profession. These events can breathe life into otherwise dry discussions of acceptable ethical behavior as set out in ethical codes. In accord with the Lessons from Woburn Project's goal to make A Civil Action and its associated materials into a powerful teaching tool, the book's events vividly illustrate the ethical parameters within which a lawyer must operate, ethical parameters …


The First Amendment, Commercial Speech, And The Advertising Lawyer, Justice Vernon R. Pearson, Michael O'Neill Jan 1986

The First Amendment, Commercial Speech, And The Advertising Lawyer, Justice Vernon R. Pearson, Michael O'Neill

Seattle University Law Review

The Supreme Court, in a few cases scattered over several decades, has implied the existence of a public right to a free flow of information as one facet of the freedom of speech; yet the Court has refrained from specifically basing a decision on any such right. But with the recent line of commercial speech decisions, the concept-of a public right to a free flow of information has become firmly established and merits detailed examination. That right, and the rationale of the Court in its commercial speech cases, may have far ranging implications. This Article explores these implications in three …


Ethical Considerations For The Justice Department When It Switches Sides During Litigation, Clifford Freed Jan 1984

Ethical Considerations For The Justice Department When It Switches Sides During Litigation, Clifford Freed

Seattle University Law Review

This Comment briefly discusses the history of Washington v. Seattle School District No. 1, and then demonstrates the difficulties in applying the present ABA Code of Professional Responsibility to certain ethical questions that can arise when the government changes its allegiance in the midst of litigation. The ethical propriety of the Department of Justice's actions is examined, and alternatives are proposed for situations in which the United States, represented in court by the Justice Department, switches sides in the same case.