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Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility

Seattle University School of Law

Seattle University Law Review

Legal Ethics

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Tiptoeing Through The Landmines: The Evolution Of States’ Legal Ethics Authority Regarding Representing Cannabis Clients, Karen E. Boxx Jan 2020

Tiptoeing Through The Landmines: The Evolution Of States’ Legal Ethics Authority Regarding Representing Cannabis Clients, Karen E. Boxx

Seattle University Law Review

Despite the continued federal classification of cannabis as an illegal drug, states have legalized the possession, use, production, and sale of cannabis. In order to do so, the states have created complex regulatory schemes to control and monitor the cannabis industry and satisfy the federal government concerns, such as use by minors and organized crime involvement. First, this Article presents the ethical dilemma of cannabis lawyering. Second, this Article describes the history, evolution, and current status of the various states’ pronouncements on a lawyer’s ethical duties with respect to the business and use of cannabis that may be legal under …


Remarks: The Declining Role Of Outside Counsel In Enhancing Ethical Conduct By Corporations, Jed S. Rakoff Mar 2016

Remarks: The Declining Role Of Outside Counsel In Enhancing Ethical Conduct By Corporations, Jed S. Rakoff

Seattle University Law Review

Judge Rakoff’s remarks from the seventh annual Berle Symposium, held May 26–27, 2015 at Seattle University School of Law.


The Practice Of Law As Response To God's Call, Susan J. Stabile Jan 2009

The Practice Of Law As Response To God's Call, Susan J. Stabile

Seattle University Law Review

Legal practice, like all human work, is a religious calling, a vocation. Section I of this Article will focus on work as a calling. Although I refer in my title to the practice of law as a response to God's call, I suggest that even those who are uncomfortable with the use of religious language can share a notion of law as a calling. Section II will address the need to discern one's place in the legal profession. Implicit in the notion of a calling is that our professional decisions are not merely internally driven, but are in response to …