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Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility

Seattle University School of Law

Seattle University Law Review

2009

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Ethics As Self-Transcendence: Legal Education, Faith, And An Ethos Of Justice, Patrick Brown Jan 2009

Ethics As Self-Transcendence: Legal Education, Faith, And An Ethos Of Justice, Patrick Brown

Seattle University Law Review

Ethics is fundamentally about ethos, attitude, one's grounded stance or existential orientation, not the extrinsicism of concepts or the formalism of rules. Ethics concerns not just any orientation, but that intimate and demanding form of personal development manifested in the experience and practice of self-transcendence. Conversely, the neglect of ethics as self-transcendence introduces deep distortions into the way we socialize students into notions of ethics and professionalism. It introduces subsequent distortions into the conditions of legal practice. It encourages a superficial and extrinsic minimalism. It encourages, in effect, the disastrous conception of legal ethics as ethical legalism. I begin by …


The Practice Of Law As Response To God's Call, Susan J. Stabile Jan 2009

The Practice Of Law As Response To God's Call, Susan J. Stabile

Seattle University Law Review

Legal practice, like all human work, is a religious calling, a vocation. Section I of this Article will focus on work as a calling. Although I refer in my title to the practice of law as a response to God's call, I suggest that even those who are uncomfortable with the use of religious language can share a notion of law as a calling. Section II will address the need to discern one's place in the legal profession. Implicit in the notion of a calling is that our professional decisions are not merely internally driven, but are in response to …