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Full-Text Articles in Law

Law Schools Harm Genizaros And Other Indigenous People By Misunderstanding Aba Policy, Bill Piatt, Moises Gonzales, Katja Wolf Jan 2019

Law Schools Harm Genizaros And Other Indigenous People By Misunderstanding Aba Policy, Bill Piatt, Moises Gonzales, Katja Wolf

Faculty Articles

Law schools justifiably seek to enroll a diverse student body in order to enrich the academic experience and environment, and to provide attorneys who will serve all segments of our society. American law schools enjoy the constitutional right to maintain such diversity. Indeed, accreditation standards promulgated by the American Bar Association ("ABA") require it. The Association of American Law Schools carries a similar mandate.

In seeking to create a diverse student body, law schools offer applicants the opportunity to identify their backgrounds. There generally is no "diversity police" checking on the accuracy of the self-identification as a member of a ...


The Teaching Of International Law, Myres S. Mcdougal Apr 2016

The Teaching Of International Law, Myres S. Mcdougal

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


What Ails The Law Schools?, Paul Horwitz Apr 2013

What Ails The Law Schools?, Paul Horwitz

Michigan Law Review

In January 2012, law professors from across the country arrived in Washington, D.C., for the annual conference of the Association of American Law Schools ("AALS"). It was an opportune moment. The legal economy was struggling. Graduates were begging for jobs and struggling with unprecedented levels of debt. The smart talk from the experts was that the legal economy was undergoing a fundamental restructuring. For these and other reasons, law schools were under fire, from both inside and outside of the academy. Judges - including the keynote speaker at the AALS conference himself! - derided legal scholarship as useless. Law school deans ...


Regulators, Mount Up, Ben L. Trachtenberg Jan 2013

Regulators, Mount Up, Ben L. Trachtenberg

Faculty Publications

Since I began circulating drafts of an article arguing that certain law school officials have exposed themselves to professional discipline by engaging in dishonest marketing tactics, responses have varied considerably. Everyone seems to agree, however, that law school officials should not lie in their pursuit of students. There also appears to be broad consensus that misleading (albeit not intentionally false) marketing—such as systematically skewed salary statistics—is an unfortunate phenomenon, although disagreement remains on just how serious a problem it is and what level of corrective effort is appropriate. In their recently-published response pieces, Kyle McEntee of Law School ...


Law School Marketing And Legal Ethics, Ben L. Trachtenberg Jan 2013

Law School Marketing And Legal Ethics, Ben L. Trachtenberg

Faculty Publications

Law schools have misled prospective students for years about the value of legal education. In some cases, law school officials have engaged in outright deceit, knowingly spreading false information about their schools. More commonly, they have presented statistics — especially those concerning the employment outcomes of law graduates — in ways nearly guaranteed to confuse readers. These deceptions and sharp practices violate the norms of the legal profession, a profession that scrupulously regulates the advertising of legal services. The deceptions also violate ethical rules prohibiting lawyers from engaging in dishonesty, misrepresentation, and deceit. This article exposes how pitches aimed at prospective students ...


The Aba, The Aall, The Aals, And The “Duplication Of Legal Publications”, Richard A. Danner Jan 2012

The Aba, The Aall, The Aals, And The “Duplication Of Legal Publications”, Richard A. Danner

Faculty Scholarship

Between 1935 and 1940, the American Bar Association, the Association of American Law Schools, and the American Association of Law Libraries joined forces to work on solutions to a problem often referred to as the “duplication of legal publications.” The need for practicing attorneys and law libraries to purchase multiple and duplicative versions of published law reports and other law books was burdensome in costs, complicated the research process, and contributed to what the American Law Institute identified as the two chief defects of American law: “its uncertainty and its complexity.” This article highlights the efforts of the ABA, the ...


Succeeding In The Candidate Pool: Resources Available At Association Of American Law Schools For Persons Interested In Becoming A Law School Dean, David A. Brennen Jan 2008

Succeeding In The Candidate Pool: Resources Available At Association Of American Law Schools For Persons Interested In Becoming A Law School Dean, David A. Brennen

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

This article covers three areas that fall under the author’s supervision as Deputy Director of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS). First, the author will discuss the two Deans Databanks that he administers, which relate directly to increasing diversity among the ranks of law school deans in America: the Women Deans Databank and the Minority Deans Databank. In particular, the author will address how these two databanks reflect the core values of the AALS and how the databanks function in the deanship process. Second, the author will discuss the Law Deanship Manual an AALS publication that addresses nearly ...


Succeeding In The Candidate Pool: Resources Available For Persons Interested In Becoming A Law School Dean, David A. Brennan Jan 2008

Succeeding In The Candidate Pool: Resources Available For Persons Interested In Becoming A Law School Dean, David A. Brennan

Seattle University Law Review

This presentation covers three areas that fall under my supervision as Deputy Director of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS). First, I will discuss the two Deans Databanks that I administer, which relate directly to increasing diversity among the ranks of law school deans in America: the Women Deans Databank and the Minority Deans Databank. In particular, I will address how these two databanks reflect the core values of the AALS and how the databanks function in the deanship process. Second, I will discuss the Law Deanship Manual, an AALS publication that addresses nearly every aspect of what it ...


Learning And Serving: Pro Bono Legal Services By Law Students, David L. Chambers, Cynthia F. Adcock Jan 2000

Learning And Serving: Pro Bono Legal Services By Law Students, David L. Chambers, Cynthia F. Adcock

Articles

All lawyers' codes of professional ethics in the United States expect members of the bar to perform legal services for low-income persons. In practice, as we all know, many lawyers perform a great deal of such service while others do little or none. By much the same token, the accreditation rules of the American Bar Association urge all law schools to provide students with opportunities to do pro bono legal work; by much the same token, some schools in the United States have extensive programs for their students but many do not. In 1998, the Association of American Law Schools ...


Book Review: Law School: Legal Education In America From The 1850s To The 1980s By Robert Stevens, Eric A. Chiappinelli Jan 1987

Book Review: Law School: Legal Education In America From The 1850s To The 1980s By Robert Stevens, Eric A. Chiappinelli

Seattle University Law Review

This Book Review examines Law School: Legal Education in America from the 1850s to the 1980s, by Robert Stevens. The Review explains that the book is a history of American legal education from 1850 through 1945, with a foreshortened treatment of events to 1870 and a prolonged view of the period between 1870 and 1945. Stevens’s work is chronological and details three developments: the hegemony of Harvard and later the American Bar Association and the Association of American Law Schools over educational standards; the role of Harvard in establishing the primacy of the case method of instruction; and the ...


Two Views Of The Question: Are Law Schools Doing Their Job?, Terrance Sandalow, Robert B. Mckay Jan 1985

Two Views Of The Question: Are Law Schools Doing Their Job?, Terrance Sandalow, Robert B. Mckay

Other Publications

You have all heard the criticisms of lawyers, which I need not rehearse to this audience. Critics range from Aristotle, Jesus, Shakespeare, and Samuel Johnson to Jimmy Carter and Derek Bok; the cast of characters goes on and on. The criticism I like best, although in a way it is the most cutting of all, is what Samuel Johnson is alleged to have said about two centuries ago: "I do not like to speak ill of any man behind his back but I do believe he is a lawyer." It is always easy to bring people together, nonlawyers at least ...


Raise The Roof Over This, Lisa Hooker Feb 1984

Raise The Roof Over This, Lisa Hooker

Sheldon Plager (1977-1984)

No abstract provided.


No Contest When Hue, Cry Is Over Trees, Law School Courts Defeat, Greg Dawson Jan 1982

No Contest When Hue, Cry Is Over Trees, Law School Courts Defeat, Greg Dawson

Sheldon Plager (1977-1984)

No abstract provided.


Law School Meets Accreditation Standards, Tiba Altoma Feb 1979

Law School Meets Accreditation Standards, Tiba Altoma

Sheldon Plager (1977-1984)

No abstract provided.


Law Dean Unhappy With Commissions Actions, Kevin Scioni Nov 1978

Law Dean Unhappy With Commissions Actions, Kevin Scioni

Sheldon Plager (1977-1984)

No abstract provided.


To Meet Accreditation Standards...Law School Remodeling To Begin, Kevin Scionti Aug 1978

To Meet Accreditation Standards...Law School Remodeling To Begin, Kevin Scionti

Sheldon Plager (1977-1984)

No abstract provided.


Law Library's Stacks Packed, Paul Rumschlag Feb 1978

Law Library's Stacks Packed, Paul Rumschlag

Sheldon Plager (1977-1984)

No abstract provided.


I.U. Law School Needs Help: Dean, Bruce C. Smith Sep 1977

I.U. Law School Needs Help: Dean, Bruce C. Smith

Sheldon Plager (1977-1984)

No abstract provided.


Law School Needs More Faculty, Space, John Fancher Sep 1977

Law School Needs More Faculty, Space, John Fancher

Sheldon Plager (1977-1984)

No abstract provided.


New Law Dean Seeks More Funds To Improve School, Jules Schwab Aug 1977

New Law Dean Seeks More Funds To Improve School, Jules Schwab

Sheldon Plager (1977-1984)

No abstract provided.


Meeting Of The Association Of American Law Schools, Jerome Hall Jan 1930

Meeting Of The Association Of American Law Schools, Jerome Hall

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Legal Education And Admission To The Bar, Henry M. Bates Jan 1922

Legal Education And Admission To The Bar, Henry M. Bates

Articles

From Conclusions: "We cannot close this report with some general remarks concerning standards of admission to the bar. An examination of the Proceedings of the American and the various state bar associations during the last few years will show a constant expression of dissatisfaction with the comparatively low standards for admission which prevail ..."


Legal Education, Henry M. Bates Nov 1917

Legal Education, Henry M. Bates

Articles

Bates describes the growth of law schools and the changing nature of legal education: "The outstanding fact in legal education in this country during the past twenty-five years is the shift from the law office to the law school as the avenue of approach to the bar.... This increase in the number of institutions teaching law and in the number of students preparing for the bar in this way makes on the whole for improvement, but the ointment is not without its flies..."