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Full-Text Articles in Law

Lawyers As Social Engineers: How Lawyers Should Use Their Social Capital To Achieve Economic Justice, Dana Thompson Jan 2021

Lawyers As Social Engineers: How Lawyers Should Use Their Social Capital To Achieve Economic Justice, Dana Thompson

Michigan Journal of Race and Law

The Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review (MBELR) has always strived to provide a platform for legal scholars, professionals, and students to publish business-related legal scholarship. Yet, little legal business scholarship focusing on the Black business community exists, despite the extraordinary impact that Black communities have in the U.S. business landscape. In a year of revolutionary social change, we are excited to feature in this special issue the work of Professor Dana Thompson, a Michigan Law alumna, in an effort to remedy this gap. Professor Thompson’s career, professional values, and day-to-day work demonstrate genuine, commanding, and inspiring commitment to social …


Looking Toward Restorative Justice For Redlined Communities Displaced By Eco-Gentrification, Helen H. Kang Jan 2021

Looking Toward Restorative Justice For Redlined Communities Displaced By Eco-Gentrification, Helen H. Kang

Michigan Journal of Race and Law

MJEAL chose to publish Helen Kang’s piece, Looking Toward Restorative Justice for Redlined Communities Displaced by Eco-Gentrification, because it offers a unique analytic approach for analyzing the roots of environmental racism and the appropriate tools to help rectify it. She offers an argument for why restorative justice needs to be the framework and explains how we can accomplish this in the context of a whole government solution. MJEAL is excited to offer what will be an influential approach for environmental restorative justice to the broader activist and academic community.


Criminal Justice And The Mattering Of Lives, Deborah Tuerkheimer Apr 2018

Criminal Justice And The Mattering Of Lives, Deborah Tuerkheimer

Michigan Law Review

A review of James Forman Jr., Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America.


Separate And Unequal: Federal Tough-On-Guns Program Targets Minority Communities For Selective Enforcement, Bonita R. Gardner Jan 2007

Separate And Unequal: Federal Tough-On-Guns Program Targets Minority Communities For Selective Enforcement, Bonita R. Gardner

Michigan Journal of Race and Law

This Article examines the Project Safe Neighborhoods program and considers whether its disproportionate application in urban, majority- African American cities (large and small) violates the guarantee of equal protection under the law. This Article will start with a description of the program and how it operates-the limited application to street-level criminal activity in predominately African American communities. Based on preliminary data showing that Project Safe Neighborhoods disproportionately impacts African Americans, the Article turns to an analysis of the applicable law. Most courts have analyzed Project Safe Neighborhoods' race-based challenges under selective prosecution case law, which requires a showing by the …


The Rise And Fall Of Affirmative Action Injury Selection, Avern Cohn, David R. Sherwood Dec 1999

The Rise And Fall Of Affirmative Action Injury Selection, Avern Cohn, David R. Sherwood

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan has historically experienced difficulty in achieving jury compositions that truly represented the surrounding community. In response, the Authors share their insight as to how the court instituted a "balancing" program. By reducing the number of white names in the jury wheel, the balancing program successfully incorporated more minorities into the jury system. The Authors further discuss the Sixth Circuit decision, United States v. Ovalle, which marked the end of the balancing program.


Failure And Forgiveness: A Review, James J. White Jan 1999

Failure And Forgiveness: A Review, James J. White

Reviews

In Failure and Forgiveness, Professor Karen Gross has written two books about bankruptcy. The first book, found in the first nine chapters, describes the bankruptcy law, the bankruptcy system, its operation, and the policies that support that law and system. This first book is written for a lay audience, and it is an admirable exposition of the law and policy. The second book, chapters ten to fifteen, contains several proposals for change in the bankruptcy law and states arguments to justify those proposals. The second book shows Professor Gross to be a kindly socialist, deeply suspicious of free markets and …


Courts And Cultural Distinctiveness, Marie R. Deveney Jun 1992

Courts And Cultural Distinctiveness, Marie R. Deveney

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The claim that minority ethnic and religious groups are culturally distinct from the dominant society is often, either implicitly or explicitly, a key element of demands these groups make to courts and legislatures for accommodation of their needs. In such cases, the decision maker's understanding of what constitutes "cultural distinctiveness" is crucial, for it can strongly influence the outcome of the accommodation question. In this brief Essay related to Peter Welsh's and Joseph Carens's papers and Dean Suagee's remarks delivered at the Preservation of Minority Cultures Symposium, I contrast these panelists' subtle and sophisticated understandings of cultural distinctiveness with the …


Law And Disputing In Commercializing Early America, Cornelia Dayton May 1989

Law And Disputing In Commercializing Early America, Cornelia Dayton

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Neighbors and Strangers: Law and Community in Early Connecticut by Bruce H. Mann


Constituting Communities Through Words That Bind: Reflections On Loyalty Oaths, Sanford Levinson Jun 1986

Constituting Communities Through Words That Bind: Reflections On Loyalty Oaths, Sanford Levinson

Michigan Law Review

Preparation of this essay has not served to resolve my own ambivalences about what, after all, Duncan Kennedy once named the "fundamental contradiction" of all social life, the tension between "individual freedom" and the coercive communal life with "[o]thers (family, friends, bureaucrats, cultural figures, the state)" that is "necessary if we are to become persons at all - they provide us the stuff of our selves and protect us ,in crucial ways against destruction." It should not be surprising if something so fundamental does not prove amenable to resolution. In any case, the reader should not expect to find a …


Law, Legalism, And Community Before The American Revolution, Bruce H. Mann Jun 1986

Law, Legalism, And Community Before The American Revolution, Bruce H. Mann

Michigan Law Review

The connections between law and community are difficult to identify, let alone explain. It may be best to begin by seeing how law and the ways people used it changed, and then attempt to relate those changes to the surrounding economy and society. One must, of course, be wary of finding what one looks for. Nonetheless, as with objects against a dark background, it is sometimes easier to see things when they move than when they remain still. To illustrate the interactive nature of legal change and community, I will draw on examples from Connecticut before the Revolution - not …


Community, Citizenship, And The Search For National Identity, Frederick Schauer Jun 1986

Community, Citizenship, And The Search For National Identity, Frederick Schauer

Michigan Law Review

As a test of this proposition, I want to explore the issue of alienage restrictions. Under what circumstances is it justifiable to draw lines based on whether a person is a citizen? Lines drawn on the basis of citizenship are a useful test of how seriously we take the idea of the nation as a relevant community and, more tangentially, of how seriously we take the idea of community itself. To the extent that we are skeptical of such lines, our concerns are to that extent individual-oriented, primarily focused on the adverse consequences of excluding some people from benefits or …


Introduction: Is Cultural Criticism Possible?, James Boyd White Jan 1986

Introduction: Is Cultural Criticism Possible?, James Boyd White

Michigan Law Review

It is by now something of a truism that the abstract and conceptual modes of discourse that have dominated our intellectual life in the past century have led to a rather reduced and schematic view of law. Moved by the desire to talk about social institutions in a neutral and scientific way, scholars beginning at least with John Austin have sought to define law as a set of rules, promulgated by a sovereign and addressed to the behavior of subject individuals, all in an attempt to isolate legal phenomena from their context for scientific study. Rules, on this view, are …


City Zoning: The Once And Future Frontier, Michigan Law Review Mar 1981

City Zoning: The Once And Future Frontier, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

A Review of City Zoning: The Once and Future Frontier by Clifford L. Weaver and Richard F. Babcock


Apartheid In America: A Historical And Legal Analysis Of Contemporary Racial Segregation In The United States, Michigan Law Review Mar 1981

Apartheid In America: A Historical And Legal Analysis Of Contemporary Racial Segregation In The United States, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Apartheid in America: A Historical and Legal Analysis of Contemporary Racial Segregation in the United States by James A. Kushner


Reich: The Greening Of American And Skinner: Beyond Freedom And Dignity, Donald H.J. Hermann Dec 1971

Reich: The Greening Of American And Skinner: Beyond Freedom And Dignity, Donald H.J. Hermann

Michigan Law Review

A Review of The Greening of American by Charles A. Reich and Beyond Freedom and Dignity by B. F. Skinner