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Understanding Bias In Civil Procedure: Towards An Empirical Analysis Of Procedural Rule-Making's Role In Continuing Inequality, Masai Mcdougall Jan 2023

Understanding Bias In Civil Procedure: Towards An Empirical Analysis Of Procedural Rule-Making's Role In Continuing Inequality, Masai Mcdougall

Journal Articles

This Article uses the history of procedural rules governing “freedom suits” to elucidate the collection of rights that constitute the Western idea of “individual liberty,” and to make a prima facie case that our current Rules of Civil Procedure are biased against the enforcement of those rights by American minorities. This history reveals a systemic inequality in procedural rights that both pre-dates race and favors the consolidation of economic and political power over the enjoyment of the rights that supply the foundation for classical liberalism. I argue that collecting demographic data on litigants’ interaction with our Rules of Civil Procedure …


The Scarlet Letter "E": How Tenancy Screening Policies Exacerbate Housing Inequity For Evicted Black Women, Yvette N.A. Pappoe Jan 2023

The Scarlet Letter "E": How Tenancy Screening Policies Exacerbate Housing Inequity For Evicted Black Women, Yvette N.A. Pappoe

Journal Articles

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in an unprecedented health and economic crisis in the United States. In addition to more than nine hundred thousand deaths in the United States and counting, another kind of crisis emerged from the pandemic: an eviction crisis. In August 2020, an estimated thirty to forty million people in America were at risk of facing eviction by the end of the year. Black women renters faced a higher risk of losing their homes than other groups. At the onset of the pandemic, the federal government implemented eviction moratoria to prevent the evictions of tenants who were unable …


Statement Of The District Task Force On Jails And Justice. Before The Committee On The Judiciary And Public Safety Of The Council Of The District Of Columbia, Katherine S. Broderick Jan 2022

Statement Of The District Task Force On Jails And Justice. Before The Committee On The Judiciary And Public Safety Of The Council Of The District Of Columbia, Katherine S. Broderick

D.C. Council Testimony

No abstract provided.


Citizenship, Race, And Statehood, Kristina M. Campbell Jan 2022

Citizenship, Race, And Statehood, Kristina M. Campbell

Journal Articles

This Article will discuss the interplay between citizenship, race, and ratification of statehood in the United States, both historically and prospectively. Part II will discuss the development and history of the Insular Cases and the creation of the Territorial Incorporation Doctrine (“TID”), focusing on the Territory of Puerto Rico and how the issues of citizenship, race, and statehood have evolved in shadow of empire as a result. Part III will look back on the admission to the Union of New Mexico and Arizona—the forty-seventh and forty-eighth states—and discuss the substantial difficulties these territories had in getting admitted for statehood due …


Seeking Tax Justice For Undocumented Immigrant Workers, Jacqueline Lainez Flanagan Aug 2021

Seeking Tax Justice For Undocumented Immigrant Workers, Jacqueline Lainez Flanagan

Journal Articles

Global Roundtable is a regular series appearing in Tax Notes Federal, Tax Notes State, and Tax Notes International that brings together experts from each discipline to help advance the discussion of tax issues. In this installment, the authors examine the lack of racial diversity in the tax profession and built-in biases in tax policies and suggest ways to remedy the inequities. This article is intended for general information purposes only and does not and is not intended to constitute legal advice. The reader should consult with legal counsel to determine how laws or decisions discussed herein apply to the reader’s …


A Starting Point For Disability Justice In Legal Education, Christina Payne-Tsoupros Jan 2020

A Starting Point For Disability Justice In Legal Education, Christina Payne-Tsoupros

Journal Articles

This article explores how a disability justice framework would provide greater access to law school and therefore the legal profession for disabled students of color; specifically, disabled Black, Indigenous, and Latinx students. Using DisCrit principles formulated by Subini Annamma, David Connor, and Beth Ferri (2013), this article provides suggestions for incorporating a disability justice lens to legal education. In doing so, this article specifically recognizes the work of three disability justice activist-attorney-scholars, Lydia X.Z. Brown, Talila “TL” Lewis, and Katherine Pérez, and considers lessons from their advocacy and leadership that can apply in the law school setting.


The Intersection Of Race, Bond, And "Crimmigration" In The United States Immigration Detention System, Tremaine Hemans Mar 2019

The Intersection Of Race, Bond, And "Crimmigration" In The United States Immigration Detention System, Tremaine Hemans

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

The United States ("U.S.") Supreme Court's recent decision in Jennings v. Rodriguez' has potentially opened another avenue for people of color to become entangled in the U.S.' predatory immigration system, through the denial of bail hearings. Denial of periodic bond hearings ensures that many detainees in immigration facilities will be held indefinitely until these detainees' cases are adjudicated. In Jennings, the Court held that detained aliens do not have a right to periodic bond hearings even if they are detained for prolonged periods of time, due to the language of the mandatory and discretionary detention statutes at §§ 1225(b)(1)-(2) and …


Dismantling The Master's House: Toward A Justice-Based Theory Of Community Economic Development, Etienne Toussaint Jan 2019

Dismantling The Master's House: Toward A Justice-Based Theory Of Community Economic Development, Etienne Toussaint

Journal Articles

Since the end of the American Civil War, scholars have debated the efficacy of various models of community economic development, or CED. Historically, this debate has tracked one of two approaches: place-based models of CED, seeking to stimulate community development through market-driven economic growth programs, and people-based models of CED, focused on the removal of structural barriers to social and economic mobility that prevent human flourishing. More recently, scholars and policymakers have turned to a third model from the impact investing community—the social impact bond, or SIB. The SIB model of CED ostensibly finds a middle ground by leveraging funding …


Post-Ferguson Social Engineering: Problem-Solving Justice Or Just Posturing, Mae C. Quinn Jan 2016

Post-Ferguson Social Engineering: Problem-Solving Justice Or Just Posturing, Mae C. Quinn

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Chaining Kids To The Ever Turning Wheel: Other Contemporary Costs Of Juvenile Court Involvement, Candace Johnson, Mae Quinn Jan 2016

Chaining Kids To The Ever Turning Wheel: Other Contemporary Costs Of Juvenile Court Involvement, Candace Johnson, Mae Quinn

Journal Articles

In this essay, Candace Johnson and Mae Quinn respond to Tamar Birckhead’s important article The New Peonage, based, in part, on their work and experience representing youth in St. Louis, Missouri. They concur with Professor Birckhead’s conclusions about the unfortunate state of affairs in 21st century America— that we use fines, fees, and other prosecution practices to continue to unjustly punish poverty and oppressively regulate racial minorities. Such contemporary processes are far too reminiscent of historic convict leasing and Jim Crow era efforts intended to perpetuate second-class citizenship for persons of color. Johnson and Quinn add to Professor Birckhead’s critique …


The 'New Selma' And The Old Selma: Arizona, Alabama, And The Immigration Civil Rights Movement In The Twenty-First Century, Kristina M. Campbell Jan 2016

The 'New Selma' And The Old Selma: Arizona, Alabama, And The Immigration Civil Rights Movement In The Twenty-First Century, Kristina M. Campbell

Journal Articles

In his unfinished manuscript, “The Politics of Expulsion: A Short History of Alabama’s Anti-Immigrant Law, HB 56,” the late Raymond A. Mohl, Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, directly and succinctly identified the true nature of the motivations behind the passage of HB 56 in the Alabama legislature. Professor Mohl observed that “nativist fears of large numbers of ethnically different newcomers, especially over job competition and unwanted cultural change, sometimes referred to as “cultural dilution,” provided political cover for politicians who sought to control and regulate immigration within state borders, but also to push illegal …


A Dry Hate: White Supremacy And Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric In The Humanitarian Crisis On The U.S.-Mexico Border, Kristina M. Campbell Jan 2015

A Dry Hate: White Supremacy And Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric In The Humanitarian Crisis On The U.S.-Mexico Border, Kristina M. Campbell

Journal Articles

Beginning with the passage of its anti-immigrant “Show-Me-Your-Papers” law in April 2010, S.B. 1070, much has been written about the hostile political climate toward noncitizens in the State of Arizona specifically and the U.S.-Mexico border generally. However, the recent influx of refugees from Central America to the United States has seen a resurgence in the anti-immigrant rhetoric, which is particularly disturbing since a large percentage of the individuals fleeing violence and poverty are children. In this vein, one aspect of the genesis of S.B. 1070 and other anti-immigrant laws that have not received a great deal of attention is the …


Identity Property: Protecting The New Ip In A Race-Relevant World, Philip Lee Jan 2015

Identity Property: Protecting The New Ip In A Race-Relevant World, Philip Lee

Journal Articles

This Article explores the relatively new idea in American legal thought that people of color are human beings whose dignity and selfhood are worthy of legal protection. While the value and protection of whiteness throughout American legal history is undeniable, non-whiteness' has had a more turbulent history. For most of American history, the concept of non-whiteness was constructed by white society and reinforced by law-i.e., through a process of socio-legal construction-in a way that excluded its possessor from the fruits of citizenship. However, people of color have resisted this negative construction of selfhood. This resistance led to the development of …


Rising Arizona: The Legacy Of The Jim Crow Southwest On Immigration Law And Policy After 100 Years Of Statehood, Kristina M. Campbell Jan 2014

Rising Arizona: The Legacy Of The Jim Crow Southwest On Immigration Law And Policy After 100 Years Of Statehood, Kristina M. Campbell

Journal Articles

United States immigration law and policy is one the most controversial issues of our day, and perhaps no location has come under more scrutiny for the way it has attempted to deal with the problem of undocumented immigration than the State of Arizona. Though Arizona recently became notorious for its “papers please” law, SB 1070, the American Southwest has long been a bastion of discriminatory race-based law and policy – immigration and otherwise – directed toward Latinos, American Indians, African-Americans, and other non-White racial and ethnic minorities. While largely ignored by both legal and American historians, the socalled “Jim Crow …


The Case Of Dixon V. Alabama: From Civil Rights To Students' Rights And Back Again, Philip Lee Jan 2014

The Case Of Dixon V. Alabama: From Civil Rights To Students' Rights And Back Again, Philip Lee

Journal Articles

On February 25, 1960, African American students from Alabama State College participated in a sit-in at a segregated lunch grill at the Montgomery County Courthouse. The lunch grill refused to serve the students and ordered them to leave. The students left and went to the courthouse corridor, where they remained for an hour before going back to campus.

When Alabama State College learned of the students’ actions, it summarily expelled them without notice or hearing. In expelling the students, the college relied on Alabama State Board of Education regulations that allowed it to expel students for “conduct unbecoming a student …


(Un)Reasonable Suspicion: Racial Profiling In Immigration Enforcement After Arizona V. United States, Kristina M. Campbell Jan 2013

(Un)Reasonable Suspicion: Racial Profiling In Immigration Enforcement After Arizona V. United States, Kristina M. Campbell

Journal Articles

n June 25, 2012, the Supreme Court of the United States issued its landmark decision in Arizona v. United States, 1 striking down three of the four provisions of Arizona’s notorious Senate Bill (“S.B.”) 10702 challenged by the United States Department of Justice as preempted by federal immigration law. Despite agreeing with the government that the majority of Arizona’s attempt to regulate immigration at the state level through S.B. 1070 was impermissible, the Supreme Court let stand the most controversial section of the law, Section 2(B)—the socalled “show me your papers” provision.3 Under Section 2(B), state and local law enforcement …


The "Asian" Category In Mcas Achievement Gap Tracking: Time For A Change, Philip Lee Jan 2011

The "Asian" Category In Mcas Achievement Gap Tracking: Time For A Change, Philip Lee

Journal Articles

Data gathered on Asian American students in public school by the Massachusetts Department of Education are aggregated into one general “Asian” category, which may skew the results, both perpetuating an enduring myth and masking any true gaps that may exist for certain Asian American subgroups. As explored in this article, achievement gap tracking for the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System is an apt example.

In this article, I posit that this aggregation of many subgroups into one general “Asian” category perpetuates the myth of Asian Americans as a model minority, while downplaying any achievement gap that exists for certain Asian American …


Priam's Lament: The Intersection Of Law And Morality In The Right To Burial And Its Need For Recognition In Post-Katrina New Orleans, Sarah Tomkins Mar 2009

Priam's Lament: The Intersection Of Law And Morality In The Right To Burial And Its Need For Recognition In Post-Katrina New Orleans, Sarah Tomkins

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Priam's lament might resound with those of us who saw certain images after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans three short years ago: bodies of beloved mothers, fathers, sisters, and brothers dangling from house rafters and left to rot on street corners and in basements for months. The remaining unidentified victims were interred last summer at a new memorial, after spending the three years since Hurricane Katrina in a storage facility.3 How could this happen? In America, we might not expect the intercession of gods, but we do expect our government to set reasonable limits on human suffering. Were there just …


Two Tailors: The Pursuit Of Racial Justice In 1970s Chicago, Susan L. Waysdorf Dec 2007

Two Tailors: The Pursuit Of Racial Justice In 1970s Chicago, Susan L. Waysdorf

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Every legal case has a story behind it, and some, like this one, also have a legacy. This is a story about two immigrant tailors in Chicago-the white tailor's attempt to sell his tailor shop to the black tailor, and the racial discrimination they confronted together. One tailor, Ivan Thompson, was a black citizen of Great Britain living in Chicago, and the other, Martin Waysdorf, was a white Jew from Poland. He became a. U.S. citizen in 1949, after emigrating from his Polish shtetl to Chicago and escaping the Nazi Holocaust.' The Jewish tailor was my father. This article will …


Naacp V. The Attorney General: Black Community Struggle Against Police Violence, 1959-68, Jay Stewart Jan 2006

Naacp V. The Attorney General: Black Community Struggle Against Police Violence, 1959-68, Jay Stewart

Journal Articles

On March 30, 1959, the U.S. Supreme Court issued two decisions which set the stage for a new era in police-community relations. In Abbate v. United States. I and Bartkus v. Illinois,2 the Court gave the U.S. Justice Department the power to prosecute police officers under federal civil rights laws for acts of racist violence - even when they were already under state or local investigation - without fear of violating states' rights. These decisions - had they been enforced - would have been welcome news at the New York headquarters of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored …


Millennium Showdown For Public Interest Law And Non-White Access To Public Higher Education: Wolves Circling At The Henhouse Door, Stephanie Y. Brown Mar 2003

Millennium Showdown For Public Interest Law And Non-White Access To Public Higher Education: Wolves Circling At The Henhouse Door, Stephanie Y. Brown

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Institutions of higher education are uniquely positioned to influence the tone and character of justice available in the society. As centers of information and acculturation, colleges, universities, and professional schools determine the next generation of legal innovators and how they will be trained. In an era when aggressive opponents of racial equality indulged by a conservative court impede the gradual progress made possible through affirmative action programs, I believe that legal educators share considerable responsibility for the chronic deficiency of equal access to education plaguing racial minorities in this country. Intoxicated by the rhetoric of public interest and ritualistic tilting …


The Role Of Discrimination And Drug Policy In Excessive Incarceration In The United States, Steven J. Boretos Sep 2001

The Role Of Discrimination And Drug Policy In Excessive Incarceration In The United States, Steven J. Boretos

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Race And National Origin As Influential Factors In Juvenile Detention, Arthur L. Burnett Sr. Sep 1995

Race And National Origin As Influential Factors In Juvenile Detention, Arthur L. Burnett Sr.

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

The focus of this Article, however, is on the more pervasive problem of overzealous police officers acting on less than probable cause or even less than reasonable articulable suspicion. Police officers may frequently act on hunches or suspicions with the attitude that their actions will not be questioned, especially when the victim is a minor and may not be savvy enough to know his or her legal rights. Officers may believe they can act with impunity because of the combination of socio-economic conditions in public housing areas and in other low-income housing areas, or where there are a substantial number …


Challenging Prosecutorial Peremptory Challenges: Little V. United States, Suzanne Frare Mar 1994

Challenging Prosecutorial Peremptory Challenges: Little V. United States, Suzanne Frare

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Victimization, The Poor, And Payne V. Tennessee, Richard Bender Abell Mar 1992

Victimization, The Poor, And Payne V. Tennessee, Richard Bender Abell

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

No abstract provided.