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Jurisdiction

Michigan Law Review

Extraterritoriality

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Extraterritorial Criminal Jurisdiction, Michael Farbiarz Feb 2016

Extraterritorial Criminal Jurisdiction, Michael Farbiarz

Michigan Law Review

Over and over again during the past few decades, the federal government has launched ambitious international prosecutions in the service of U.S. national security goals. These extraterritorial prosecutions of terrorists, arms traffickers, and drug lords have forced courts to grapple with a question that has long been latent in the law: What outer boundaries does the Constitution place on criminal jurisdiction? Answering this question, the federal courts have crafted a new due process jurisprudence. This Article argues that this jurisprudence is fundamentally wrong. By implicitly constitutionalizing concerns for international comity, the new due process jurisprudence usurps the popular branches’ traditional …


Keeping The Door Ajar For Foreign Plaintiffs In Global Cartel Cases After Empagran, Jeremy M. Suhr Feb 2007

Keeping The Door Ajar For Foreign Plaintiffs In Global Cartel Cases After Empagran, Jeremy M. Suhr

Michigan Law Review

In many ways, the Supreme Court's opinion of F. Hoffmann-LaRoche Ltd. V. Empagran S.A. raised more questions than it answered. Growing out of the massive international vitamins cartel uncovered in the 1990s, Empagran presented a scenario in which all parties were foreign and all conduct occurred abroad. Although it is "well established by now that the Sherman Act applies to foreign conduct that was meant to produce and did in fact produce some substantial effect in the United States," Empagran presented the Court with the first truly foreign antitrust case. It involved not only foreign conduct, but also foreign plaintiffs …


Jurisdiction Over Foreign Ships In Territorial Waters, Charles Noble Gregory Feb 1904

Jurisdiction Over Foreign Ships In Territorial Waters, Charles Noble Gregory

Michigan Law Review

War, says Grotius, "is undertaken for the sake of peace." So discussion is undertaken for the sake of conclusions. If the conclusions are not as definite as could be wished in the present instance, it is hoped that it is not wholly due to the indolence or incompetency of the writer, but in large part to the difficulties presented by the overlapping of municipal and international laws, and by the lack of any final tribunal which can adjust and end differences. Again Grotius, and there is no better authority, quotes approvingly certain rules of mercy as part of the law …