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Full-Text Articles in Law

Literary Justice, Scott Dodson, Ami Dodson Dec 2014

Literary Justice, Scott Dodson, Ami Dodson

Scott Dodson

This microsymposium essay empirically (and somewhat humorously) measures which current U.S. Supreme Court justice is the most literate, as determined by citations to great works of literary fiction. It further identifies the justices' favorite literary authors. Consistent with the mission of the Green Bag, the essay is meant to be lighthearted and entertaining, but it also recognizes the underlying importance of the intersection of legal opinion-writing and literary fiction.


The Judge As Author / The Author As Judge, Ryan B. Witte Oct 2010

The Judge As Author / The Author As Judge, Ryan B. Witte

Golden Gate University Law Review

The first section of this Article discusses the judge as an author. This section begins with an examination of the audience for judicial opinions and an outline of the different styles of judicial opinion writing. The second section of this Article examines the advantages and disadvantages of using literary tools to advance the law. The third section of this Article explores the role of the author as a judge. This section will study a small number of judges who, in addition to the law, maintain outside lives as authors or creative writers. Judges who fit into this category include authors ...


Does Law And Literature Survive Lawyerland?, Sarah Krakoff Jan 2001

Does Law And Literature Survive Lawyerland?, Sarah Krakoff

Articles

No abstract provided.


Posner On Literature, Lewis H. Larue Nov 1986

Posner On Literature, Lewis H. Larue

Scholarly Articles

Not available.


The Judicial Opinion And The Poem: Ways Of Reading, Ways Of Life, James Boyd White Jan 1984

The Judicial Opinion And The Poem: Ways Of Reading, Ways Of Life, James Boyd White

Michigan Law Review

This paper is an essay in what I want to call the poetics of the law. I begin with a largely autobiographical account of what seems to me a striking similarity in the ways in which poetry and law once were taught - and to some degree still are taught, though perhaps less comfortably so. My first object is to suggest some connections: between these two kinds of thought and expression; between the ways in which we are habituated to read texts of each sort; and between the dilemmas that confront readers and critics in each field. In doing these things ...