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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Role Of Nongovernmental Organizations In The Climate Change Negotiations, Chiara Giorgetti Jan 1998

The Role Of Nongovernmental Organizations In The Climate Change Negotiations, Chiara Giorgetti

Law Faculty Publications

The role of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in monitoring the implementation of international treaties, their relevance in the organization of development projects, and their importance in the representation and education of civil society has been acknowledged and valued by both international organizations and national governments. Nongovernmental actors also play an important role in the negotiations of international agreements. Moreover, many UN agencies work closely with NGOs. NGOs have played an important part in numerous environmental conventions, and their role is becoming more clearly defined. The presence of NGOs has also been instrumental in the evolution and development of many international environmental …


From Rio To Kyoto: A Study Of The Involvement Of Non-Governmental Organizations In The Negotiations On Climate Change, Chiara Giorgetti Jan 1998

From Rio To Kyoto: A Study Of The Involvement Of Non-Governmental Organizations In The Negotiations On Climate Change, Chiara Giorgetti

Law Faculty Publications

This Article analyzes the influence of non-governmental actors on the negotiations of the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC or the Convention). In particular, it evaluates the methods employed by NGOs in furthering their substantive agendas, the interaction among various non-governmental actors, and the results of their efforts. This Article considers two kinds of NGOs: business and environmental. Environmental NGOs (ENGOs) are the self-defined representatives of environmental interests. They campaign for the strict reduction of all gases that induce climate change. On the other side, business NGOs (BNGOs) typically represent the interests of those industries that are involved in the …


Canning Spam: Compuserve, Inc. V. Cyber Promotions, Inc., Steven E. Bennett Jan 1998

Canning Spam: Compuserve, Inc. V. Cyber Promotions, Inc., Steven E. Bennett

University of Richmond Law Review

The rapid development of the Internet as a source of information and as a means of communication has caused courts and legislatures to scramble to integrate old legal structures into a new framework. The characteristic of near-instantaneous access to millions of subscribers of various Internet service providers (ISPs) has attracted the attention of commercial advertisers, especially those seeking mass audiences. The Internet has also fostered the proliferation of electronic mail (e-mail) as a means of communication. Further, it has attracted the attention of Congress, where there are currently three bills pending which would restrict or prohibit unsolicited e-mail advertising. The …


From Stockholm To Kyoto And Back To The United States: International Environmental Law's Effect On Domestic Law, Joel B. Eisen Jan 1998

From Stockholm To Kyoto And Back To The United States: International Environmental Law's Effect On Domestic Law, Joel B. Eisen

University of Richmond Law Review

We Americans think we're so darned smart. We invented modern environmental law, developed its sophisticated "command-and-control" structure, got the public involved as never before in fighting corporate polluters, and achieved measurable successes by getting lead out of our air and bald eagles back from near extinction. We've even tried "second generation" tools such as emissions trading systems' and incentive-based regulatory flexibility approaches when we discovered our system's limitations. Not that we've got it all figured out, mind you, but we're inclined to think of ourselves as world leaders when it comes to environmental protection.


Understanding Compliance With International Environmental Agreements: The Baker's Dozen Myths, Edith Brown Weiss Jan 1998

Understanding Compliance With International Environmental Agreements: The Baker's Dozen Myths, Edith Brown Weiss

University of Richmond Law Review

Until recently, little attention has been given to whether states and other actors comply with the agreements they negotiate. The assumption has been that most states comply with most international law most of the time. There is, however, strong reason to question this assumption. As was apparent in the Breard case, which involved implementation and compliance with the consular convention, states do not necessarily comply with the international agreements they join, particularly when they involve implementation at the provincial/state and local levels.