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Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Bullshit And The Tribal Client, Matthew L.M. Fletcher Jun 2014

Bullshit And The Tribal Client, Matthew L.M. Fletcher

Matthew L.M. Fletcher

No abstract provided.


Criminal Justice In Indian Country, M. Alexander Pearl Jan 2014

Criminal Justice In Indian Country, M. Alexander Pearl

Faculty Publications

This Article examines the role played by different enacted legislation on California’s Indian tribes criminal justice system. For centuries, tribal governments were the only entities with criminal jurisdiction in Indian Country. In 1883, the Supreme Court in Ex parte Kan-Gi-Shun-Ka (Ex parte Crow Dog) confirmed that a crime committed by an Indian against another Indian did not give rise to federal jurisdiction. In response, Congress passed the Major Crimes Act, granting federal authorities the power to investigate, enforce, and prosecute certain crimes occurring in Indian Country. The federal statutes creating federal jurisdiction did not preclude tribal jurisdiction, but states …


Tribal Disruption And Indian Claims, Matthew L.M. Fletcher, Kathryn E. Fort, Dr. Nicholas J. Reo Jan 2014

Tribal Disruption And Indian Claims, Matthew L.M. Fletcher, Kathryn E. Fort, Dr. Nicholas J. Reo

Michigan Law Review First Impressions

Legal claims are inherently disruptive. Plaintiffs' suits invariably seek to unsettle the status quo. On occasion, the remedies to legal claims can be so disruptive-that is, impossible to enforce or implement in a fair and equitable manner-that courts simply will not issue them. In the area of federal Indian law, American Indian tribal claims not only disrupt the status quo but may even disrupt so-called settled expectations of those affected by the claims. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has dismissed a round of Indian land claims at the pleading stage, includingOnondaga Nation v. New York, because …