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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Breach Of The Common Law Trust Relationship Between The United States And African Americans - A Substantive Right To Reparations, Ayesha B. Hardaway Aug 2014

The Breach Of The Common Law Trust Relationship Between The United States And African Americans - A Substantive Right To Reparations, Ayesha B. Hardaway

Ayesha B. Hardaway

Domination and elaborate control of Africans in colonial America, and later the United States, were exerted to provide the requisite framework for the economically profitable Trans-Atlantic slave trade. Proponents of slavery characterized the aims of slavery in pseudo-paternalistic terms to “train” and “civilize[e] the untutored savage.”Even after the formal end of slavery, the U.S. and local governments continued to exercise its domination and elaborate control by enforcing a national system of racial segregation and discrimination. That system of government-sanctioned laws was so pervasive and commonly accepted that it has been personified as “Jim Crow.” As a result, racial hierarchy is …


The Status And Effect In New Zealand Law Of The Declaration On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples, Matthew S. R. Palmer Qc Jul 2014

The Status And Effect In New Zealand Law Of The Declaration On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples, Matthew S. R. Palmer Qc

The Hon Justice Matthew Palmer

This paper outlines the ways in which the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is reflected in, and affects, New Zealand domestic law.


Born Native, Raised White: The Divide Between Federal And Tribal Jurisdiction With Extra-Tribal Native American Adoption, Christina Lewis Jul 2014

Born Native, Raised White: The Divide Between Federal And Tribal Jurisdiction With Extra-Tribal Native American Adoption, Christina Lewis

Christina Lewis

No abstract provided.


Bullshit And The Tribal Client, Matthew L.M. Fletcher Jun 2014

Bullshit And The Tribal Client, Matthew L.M. Fletcher

Matthew L.M. Fletcher

No abstract provided.


In The Name Of The Child: Race, Gender, And Economics In Adoptive Couple V. Baby Girl, Bethany Berger Mar 2014

In The Name Of The Child: Race, Gender, And Economics In Adoptive Couple V. Baby Girl, Bethany Berger

Bethany Berger

On June 25, 2013, the Supreme Court decided Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl, holding that the Indian Child Welfare Act did not permit the Cherokee father in that case to object to termination of his parental rights. The case is ostensibly about a dispute between prospective adoptive parents and a biological father. This Article demonstrates that it is about a lot more than that. It is a microcosm of anxieties about Indian-ness, race, and the changing nature of parenthood. While made in the name of the child, moreover, the decision supports practices and policies that do not forward and may …


The Recognition Of Indigenous Peoples’ Land: Application Of The Customary Land Rights Model On The Bedouin Case, Morad Elsana Jan 2014

The Recognition Of Indigenous Peoples’ Land: Application Of The Customary Land Rights Model On The Bedouin Case, Morad Elsana

Morad Elsana

ABSTRACT This paper introduces new possibilities for the recognition of Bedouin land in Israel. It shows that the application of the prevalent methods of indigenous land recognition is possible in the Bedouin case, and it would bring legal recognition of Bedouin land rights. The paper first presents the recognition of indigenous peoples land right in Canada, Australia, and other countries, while concentrating on the native title doctrine and the adoption of indigenous customary law. It shows how many colonial legal systems eventually discovered that their judicial systems included principles that recognize indigenous customary land rights. The application of such principles …


Creating Space For Reservation Growth, Ezra Rosser Jan 2014

Creating Space For Reservation Growth, Ezra Rosser

Ezra Rosser

This brief article is a review of Robert J. Miller, Reservation "Capitalism": Economic Development in Indian Country (2012). It highlights some of the significant points Miller makes in his book and concludes that the book is a "must read" for those interested in reservation economic development.


Self-Determination, Subordination, And Semantics: Rhetorical And Real-World Conflicts Over The Human Rights Of Indigenous Women, Sam Grey Jan 2014

Self-Determination, Subordination, And Semantics: Rhetorical And Real-World Conflicts Over The Human Rights Of Indigenous Women, Sam Grey

Sam Grey

Indigenous women have long been engaged in unambiguous advocacy for a human rights-based approach to gender injustice in their communities and nations. Indigenous nations, for their part, have repeatedly and passionately posited collective human rights as necessary for the protection of cultural distinction. These projects should be reconcilable – but this reconciliation requires the political will to critically engage with historical and contemporary colonialism, and to address the internalization of patriarchy and sexism in Indigenous societies today. With such a will in place, it becomes possible to operationalize a single Indigenous ‘self-determination’ project grounded in human rights, one that sees …


Born Native, Raised White: The Divide Between Federal And Tribal Jurisdiction With Extra-Tribal Native American Adoption, Christina Lewis Jan 2014

Born Native, Raised White: The Divide Between Federal And Tribal Jurisdiction With Extra-Tribal Native American Adoption, Christina Lewis

Christina Lewis

No abstract provided.


The Aboriginal Constitution, Brian Slattery Jan 2014

The Aboriginal Constitution, Brian Slattery

Brian Slattery

In a remarkable series of cases over the past decade, from Haida Nation to Manitoba Métis Federation, the Supreme Court of Canada has thrown a strong light on three basic elements of Aboriginal law: the honour of the Crown, the Royal Proclamation of 1763, and Aboriginal Treaties. This paper argues that these form the framework of the Aboriginal Constitution, which parallels the Federal Pact between the Provinces in the Constitution Act, 1867. Indeed, the Aboriginal Constitution provides the Constitution of Canada with its most ancient and enduring roots.